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Medic2588

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  1. Things are definitely heating up in the northeast. How's the rest of the eastern seaboard making out? New York has received 175 ambulances through the FEMA National Ambulance Contract. New Jersey is getting 150 through EMAC (50 from PA and 100 from WV). How about the rest of the states? And did RichardB get washed away yet?
  2. I was on COPS (I was acquitted, thank god! ) But I found their cameramen to be very professional and respectful our patients. I had a correspondent from a major EMS magazine riding with me who had a complete emotional breakdown when we had a cardiac arrest - far more of an inconvienence trying to get him to stop crying than the COPS cameramen were.
  3. I wouldn't go around introducing yourself as a "medic" yet - although "medic" doesn't necessarily equal "paramedic". I've worked with law enforcement tactical teams who have a first responder or an EMT on their entry teams that they refer to as a 'medic'. As for your instructor... he may be doing that to build your confidence. It may also be a psychological thing to get you in the mindset of thinking and acting like a paramedic.
  4. No, I'm going to have to cast my vote for the line that said the EMTs responded "apparently to see if she was okay"... why else would they have been there?
  5. My philosophy for dealing with death from the very beginning of my career has always been: Everyone dies - it's just a matter of when. People think I'm callous when they hear that, but honestly have you ever known anyone to live forever? Keeping in mind the fact that everyone dies, I realize that all I can do is do my best everytime I go out the door. If I do my best and someone dies, then it was meant to be. I don't let it get to me unless I think that I didn't do something right or I half-assed it. It's kind of easier to get used to when you see a lot of death, but unfortunately that's difficult in a small community environment.
  6. I used to drink them regularly when I was working night shifts until I discovered how rewarding it was to get paid to nap on the job. I still drink them occasionally when I really need to stay awake (i.e. working a busy night shift then having to give a presentation in the morning). I know they aren't good for me... but I never got into coffee, I don't smoke, and I gave up drinking alcohol so man must have a vice.
  7. I did my medic clinical time in Philly and am only familiar with the FIre Department. However, try working for one of the hospital based or private transport companies to start with - it'll be a decent resume builder and any experience at this point will help.
  8. My policies have always been if they are a danger to themselves I should do everything within my power to try to convince them to go. If that fails, I can request the PD do the same. Most PDs I've worked with are extremely reluctant to force someone to go from their own house unless they are a clear threat to themselves. If that fails, I call the medical control physician and pass the buck up to him/her. If the doc can't talk sense to the patient we leave them.
  9. I just did a spit take on my computer! LMAO
  10. We have a higher cost of living, but it does make things comfortable. Not spectacular, but comfortable. We're pretty fortunate in a sense that we have so much competition between hospitals for quality medics that they keep raising the salaries.
  11. I've been very good lately but this makes it hard to resist... I have several in my books on Amazon (keyword EMS2)... Having said that, while responding to a car vs bus, with car on fire, I passed a second unrelated car fire. That fire burned through the brake lines and suddenly I have an unmanned, fully involved car chasing me down the hill. My partner and I tried to bail on the truck to use it as a roadblock to stop the flaming car from careening into a crowd of onlookers who refused to move, but the wonderful fleet maintenance had ensured that in order to open the passenger side door, I had to roll the window down half-way before the locking mechanism would disengage. In his frantic attempt to escape, my partner took the keys with him, so I was left panic-stricken and trying to kick out the windows. Wish I could say this had a dramatic/heroic ending, but the car hit a bump in the road and veered harmlessly off the street and I had to figure out where to get a change of underwear. We still needed to respond to the original call and found that it was only a minor fender-bender with 'smoke' coming from the airbag deployment. Currently top of my list of fun moments.
  12. Don't necessarily rule out NJ or areas like Rockland or Orange Counties in NY as an alternative to NYC. Not sure about NY state, but the average pay for medics in NJ just outside NYC is between $26-$30/hr before all the differentials.
  13. A lot of what you're asking is really dependent upon the department/agency you decide to work for (certifications, application process, etc). I completely second what Dust says about trying to get some ride alongs to get a feel of what you're getting into. It's nothing like what you see on TV or read in books (I'll refrain from the obvious plug ) as each area is a unique experience unto itself. As someone who left EMS full time for the glitz and glammor of government service, I would strongly advise you though to consider sucking up your differences with DoD and consider keeping that as a primary career path and try EMS on the side. Believe me, the politics of the government are no where near as cutthroat and petty as an EMS system (although there is more of a spotlight on ours)... and the benefits are waaaaay better. Devin
  14. I was debating chiming in but figured what the heck. I've worked in municipal services my whole career and had several gay/lesbian partners. I experienced some harassment for certain life style choices, but was never discriminated against job-wise. Some of the jokes could get uncomfortable at times. Those who were open and less blatant about it were generally accepted while the flamboyant, in your face types were avoided - usually because drama seemed to follow them.
  15. I have access to top secret information and here's the latest photo that I'm sure will be fueling conspiracy theorists...
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