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    • My PALS study app went live today for Android. If you are getting ready to take PALS, check it out. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wPALSQuiz2019_9326200   PALS Study Quiz 2019 I am new to developing and plan on making more. I would like some constructive criticism!  
    • Hey Defiant1 - if you are willing to move - our service is hiring EMT's, probably pays more than what you are making now.  If you get in medic school you could easily pull in around 65000 a year and that's a conservative estimate after you get out of medic school.   We are in a rural area of missouri - 55 miles south of Kansas city - running about 2000 calls a year.   If you can get your missouri license and willing to move  we can always use a good EMT who has aspirations to go to medic school.   Hey Defiant1 - if you are willing to move - our service is hiring EMT's, probably pays more than what you are making now.  If you get in medic school you could easily pull in around 65000 a year and that's a conservative estimate after you get out of medic school.   We are in a rural area of missouri - 55 miles south of Kansas city - running about 2000 calls a year.   If you can get your missouri license and willing to move  we can always use a good EMT who has aspirations to go to medic school.  
    • Problem is, we've been told over and over that we are not doctors and the only way to determine if someone is truly having a medical emergency is to transport them to the ER for evaluation.  Every medic I know is not willing to risk their licensure in order to buck the system and tell a patient that they don't qualify for a ambulance and they need to find another way to the hospital.  They not in a million years want to be the test case for a patient who truly didn't need an ambulance yet that patient felt they needed one for that stubbed toe or small laceration or what not and the patient sue that ambulance service and the medic with the Case resting on "what training did that medic have to rule out that I wasn't truly having a medical emergency that didn't require an ambulance transport???"     Because we all know that many ambulance services will drop that medic and not support him/her for turfing that patient off to a UBER or a taxi cab even if there was a policy or guideline or protocol that in all actuality supported the medic refusing transport but the ambulance service see's a loss of the legal case in both the court of law and the court of public appeal.  The medic is the one who is going to lose out in the end.     I'm not willing to risk my license just to turf a patient just to save my company a dollar or two policy/guideline/protocol or no and I don't think many of my colleagues will be willing to either.  
    • In reference to feeling ready to quit? For a year or two at least with my letter written and ready to hand in. My average so far over the past 3 years has been around 57 hours a week (thats not including my shifts left for this week). I've done 80-hour weeks where I'm essentially living at the station. Granted, 500 calls a year is probably a month for her, but its still "I can probably move into the station and be slightly ahead" I totally understand the outrage of pay, I think being paid double what the general EMT's are paid due to being an officer (minimum wage for basic, $7.5/ hr for AEMT), but the village workers entry-level is higher than mine. If not for state retirement and health insurance, I'd have probably left long ago. Honestly I'd love to be making her 17/hr though when I'm down around 13. 
    • She said she is leaving the job due to a "toxic and dangerous environment" and wrote a letter to the city explaining why. How many of you out there are close to experiencing this?  Here is the full article: https://fox8.com/2019/08/13/i-team-paramedic-writes-explosive-letter-to-city-leaders/?fbclid=IwAR2MPc9D5iZ2qHHdXcIfJ9LQ-GcpuZvK6BLjOUV0nbRGqOR8DHPeM0HOlkQ
    • There doesn't have to be a statute. The fact is that any ambulance service, private or not, that refuses transportation in an emergency is almost guaranteed to be hit with civil litigation from the patient or their family, with the additional possibility of criminal charges from negligence if the person dies from the direct result of a denied emergency transport. Any competent ambulance service understands this well. 
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