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  3. Hey Riblett, you might be better served to look to Facebook on this rather than here. this sites sort of dead now. No offense to this site but it it what it is.
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  5. Well I'm not sure how my new job will want my narrative. It's been 9 years since I wrote one and I'm getting back into the swing of things starting May 15th. But my reports when I used to write them were hand written on a paper report form. yeah, it was before computers got in our way of writing reports and before we had to tick off all those legal mumbo jumbo boxes to make the bean counters happy. So I'll give you a idea of what my narrative was like. Remember this was a long time ago so I'm sure others have better ways of doing things now. But I can tell you, my narratives never pulled me into court. 1st paragraph - What happened - why you were called, what you found, what bystanders said, what patient said, what you observed. etc patient exam/assessment - the formatting of this site makes it hard to put it all down line by line but here goes Heent(head, ears, eyes, nose, throat); Neck; Chest; Lungs; Heart; Back; Abdomen; Pelvis; Gi/GU; Extrems; Neuro/GCS/RTS/ (all of these go on their own lines with what your exam findings are) What is your Impression/Impact - what did you really decide is wrong with this patient - they say we don't diagnose but we really do. So don't be afraid to say if they are having chest pain to say chest pain or if their 12 lead shows elevation in II, III and AVF to say that. What is your impression or suspicions. And now your treatment - Number them sequentially - from when you got there to when you dropped them off at the hospital - make sure you put down if they got better or if they got worse. Don't be afraid to say that if your treatment made them worse - say it because sometimes your treatments make them worse. Sometimes your treatment like Synchronize cardioversion causes them to go into v-fib. that makes them worse. Or you give them Lidocaine to a paced rhythm (honestly I didn't see the pacer spikes- really i didnt' and you nearly code them) put that in the report. (man I felt like crap on that one - but I was a brand new medic and I learn from my mistakes and teach from those mistakes). That's all I got. Oh yeah there's one more thing - there is a very obscure book out there, if you can find it, buy it and never let it go - I did and the person lost it. It's called "The Missing Protocol-A Legally Defensible Report" by Denise Graham It doesn't tell you how to write a report but it does tell you how to write a report that will keep you out of court if you do it correctly. It's out of print so I'm not sure if you can find it, I haven't been able to find it. May the person who lost my copy be crapped upon by a thousand camels with IBS and C-diff. I hope this helped.
  6. sorry you haven't gotten a response but this is my advice 1. do not allow him to retake the test until you speak directly with the registry. 2. Talk to them about what accomodations they can give him and what he qualifies for. 3. Ask them what kind of study guides or assistance they can offer for him to prep for the next attempt at the test. 4. DO NOT ALLOW HIM TO TAKE THE TEST AGAIN until you have done all 3 of the above. He only gets 2 more times before he has to I believe take a refresher course and you don't want him to do that. Just call the registry and talk to them. We can give you advice here but please go to the source and call them directly, they are the experts about their testing process and what accomodations that they can offer someone with a disability. That's my advice.
  7. Ok, heres what I purchased today from Amazon shears BONTIME Trauma Shears - Premium Quality EMT Shears, Stainless Steel Bandage Scissors for Medical, First Aid, ER, Nurse, Doctor, 7-Inch(2- Pack, boots - already have non-steel toed boots. I think I can wait a while to purchase those if ever. I never needed them when I was practicing prior to leaving so I'm hedging my bets that I won't need them now. pen light - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07N1G7179/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Belt - going to purchase the belt when I get my pants Already have my field guide - have purchased already I think that's what a guy with a few years under his belt in the field actually needs. any other suggestions that won't make me look like a total dumbass???? One other thing, after digging through my storage boxes, I found my Littman Cardiology II stethoscope that I've had since 1992. The only thing I need to purchase is new earpieces as there is a hole in one of them The replacement earpieces will be here tomorrow.
  8. I want to add to my post Fentanyl is a great drug. It can be used on most anyone. I've used it from 2 year olds to 80 year olds and probably older but I can't remember. I don't remember a patient ask me personally to give them fentanyl, but remember I've been out of the field full time for 9 years, (part time for several), but I've been asked to give patients dilaupid(yeah I know it's spelled wrong) more times than I have fingers and toes. There is abuse potential in a lot of stuff we give. Hell there's abuse potential in flexeril as well, that's what a friend of mine was hooked on and what eventually killed him in an over dose when he took an entire bottle (90) pills because he was just tired of livin and wanted out. So I do not believe we should get rid of fentanyl just because it's the soup du jour of the addicts this year and last. 10 years ago, I believe diluadid was the soup du jour of addicts in my emergency room. It's what they asked for by name. Who knows what will be on the menu in 3-5 years from now. But for goodness sake, don't take a tool out of our arsenal because a small subset of the population have made it their drug of choice to abuse and kill themselves with. That would be I believe foolish and a knee jerk reaction, but then again, it's what we in america are known for, knee jerk reactions to a problem without finding a solution first.
  9. Yes I agree that this sounds like a real situation. And yes there is a lot missing. Would like the original poster to return to give more information. If this is his loved one that would be very helpful to know. If he's searching for answers to why paramedics or emt's did this or that and this might go to court for malpractice, he's not really going to get any information from us to possibly hang those medics out to dry as that is what the court system is for and that's what the expert witnesses get paid big bucks to do. I don't expect the OP to return but I would like him/her to do so in order for us to understand more of what they are wanting us to answer.
  10. Oh my goodness Mike, you hit the nail on the head. There have been more jobs lost, more marriages ruined, more relationships destroyed and more homes ruined by facebook than any other electronic medium every before. I personally know of at least 20 couples who have divorced because of facebook. I personally know of 30 people who have lost their jobs due to inappropriate facebook postings. I have multiple friends at work, church, and outside church who's children have sent Dickpics/naked pics to their girlfriends/boyfriends that have then gone viral over other media and it has ruined their childrens lives. I actually counsel and do small group lectures/sessions around my area on how to address it when this does happen to your family. Facebook is not the only culpret. There are other social media sites that are just as bad, some are even worse, some MUCH MUCH MUCH worse. I am putting together a teaching slideshow that I will be using with my small groups and hopefully be able to get this citywide/statewide someday. If I can get a non-profit put together and a sponsor group to back me I would love to take it nationwide because I feel so strongly about it. Guys/gals - I have 2 daughters 7 and 9 years old, and a 16 year old son. it's out there and ready and waiting for them. My son is a good kid, he's already been hit with some of the garbage that is out there. I weep for those who have been hit harder than we have. I set up my son's facebook account when he hit age 14. It has all the privacy filters and such. I have his password, I am his friend on facebook, his mother is his friend on facebook. We see every post he posts, he posts maybe 1-2 times every week. he knows the risks and dangers but he still got caught up in the cesspool of the other dangerous social media sites. I won't go into it here. It was not as bad as it could have been and we got through it. I have Police officer friends who work in Kansas City's Sex trafficking undercover world and I've been on their raids, and I watched them arrest a shit bag who was getting ready to have sex with a 3 year old. I cried my eyes out for 2 days. But she is safe and in foster care. I wanted to kill the guy and so did the officers but he is spending the rest of his life amongst the worst of the worst. It's awful and terrible. These are the officers that I've worked with to build some of my material. I've also worked with officers who work cyber crimes and crimes against minors division. it's out there, and our job to keep our kids safe. Sorry that this got off the rails but it's on us to keep our families safe, especially our daughters. and our son's. More to come
  11. I had to respond, I think it's a record in thread resurrections. And Shitty advice to begin with from the original Necromancer.
  12. Me being "Captain Obvious" here, take the situation to human resources, or at least to the immediate supervisors. Document all complaints, times, dates, the usual deal. If possible, address the issues to a female supervisor, so she might be more comfortable, even as the men working with her are uncomfortable. Running around in her underwear sounds like...well...inviting trouble. Not knowing the indivividual, could she be trying to trap some or all male colleagues into a sexual harassment lawsuit? Or even a lesbian coworker, in a similar lawsuit? When she's on the road, is she at least a competent EMT or Paramedic, or driver? If not, perhaps she's trying to keep those who could fire her off balance, with threat of a lawsuit. Again, as the Captain, her actions are behavior of an unacceptable nature. Keep the City informed as to outcome of this investigation/situation.
  13. A paramedic education never ends. Every scene, every patient, every signs and symptoms, every intervention is a test. A chance to demonstrate how much they know and how much more they have to learn. As paramedics, we are required to be generalists across many specialties. Every time paramedics respond to extreme cases, from emergency births, road crashes, through various medical emergencies. Some paramedics abseil down cliffs or out of helicopters to get to their patients. Becoming a paramedic is the highest level of pre-hospital certification. Along with that level of certification comes the responsibility of helping people in need. Nevertheless, despite the best training and preparation for their roles, paramedics also experience loss of life, grief, and tragedies that are simply a part of life and the kind of work they do. The work can be exhausting, demanding, and difficult, especially when having to work on an irregular or rotating shift. The training and experiences help prepare them to make a difference to victims of heart attacks, blocked airways, traumatic injuries, childbirth, drownings, or care for those with a diabetic emergency or seizures etc. When you call an ambulance, you place your trust in the skills and abilities of the paramedics who attend, on what could be the worst day of your life. they have to carry the burden of the public’s trust, knowing that people’s lives are literally in our hands. Paramedics are able to sort the dangerous from the non-dangerous, ensuring vulnerable patients are presented to an emergency department without taking every single complaint they see and overloading the hospital system. This accuracy and balance is very important, and requires a significant investment in training and support. Okhegwai Timothy manager at medicsng.com or follow us on facebook Medics Nigeria
  14. Hello! My name is Becca Horton, and I'm currently a senior at Roanoke College in Virginia as well as an EMT. As a part of my final thesis, I am conducting research on EMS experiences and personality attributes. The study consists on an online survey that should only take about 10 minutes to complete. The study has been approved by the Roanoke College Institutional Review Board. The information from the surveys will prove beneficial for the entirety of the EMS community as a whole. The link is below. Thank you for your help! https://roanoke.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3JdOwd2cTUQBgj3?fbclid=IwAR12vNgykj9bc6LzesOgI0nYMr2o_3II0DeHp2cCLu4ljgXYHXDB27_YKdc
  15. I agree. I was flabbergasted at what my pain management doctor did an how he treated this patient I brought to him. that is why I reported him with his refusal to treat the patient initially. thank goodness he relented and treated her appropriately in the end and I have to admit that she was treated very very appropriately and tolerated a very rough ride back to our facility with minimal pain as he wrote orders for pain relief on the trip. If she began to exhibit any pain on the trip back she had orders for meds.
  16. I've been in for thirty years and don't have a degree. I started out as a jolly voli FF who went on to get his EMT-A and then finally his P-card. When I was working overseas, I met a lot (more than a dozen) people who went to overseas schools and obtained their paramedic "degree" who could quote ad nauseum from their P books, but when it came to actually doing hands on in the field, they couldn't do sh*t. There were even some who didn't even know how to change the regulator on a D tank. Some of these guys went to Aussie universities. Some came here. I even had one "degreed" medic asking me how to operate an EZ-IO in the middle of a code. This was after I had already asked him previously if he had any questions about anything. Granted, these were foreign medics, and not US medics. But they left a very bad taste in my mouth for anyone who feels that a degree makes them better than me and my education through the School of the Street. I'm sure that, just like anything else nowadays, a requirement will come out making a degree a requirement. It will somehow translate into a good thing for someone. I don't think that it will for those cash-strapped cities that have a majority of of their population on welfare and don't have the economic base to afford a degreed staff, or the rural areas that have no cash base due to being farming areas that have no major industrial tax base. You get away from the urban areas, and the majority of the services are volunteer or paid-on-call. How could they afford these people? The money needs to come from somewhere. How do you pay more, if you can't even afford the basics. Literally. Just my old, crotchety, non-degreed, two cents worth. 😉😎
  17. It is pretty easy to get started. You need to take an instructor class, buy the video's and manikins. Once all this is completed you are all set. For manikins depending where you get you instructor training you may be able to rent them to start. All this can be done for less then a $1000.
  18. This is simply a survey for a college class of mine. I'd appreciate it if you go through and respond to it. It's part of a research portion of a paper. The following link is the Google Forms survey. https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdhfi204oxOQkP1g43a09WVTajws7imwgzh_8wCjPW08MfySA/viewform?usp=pp_url
  19. Several services I worked for had dash cams. A couple aircraft for my flight service had cockpit cameras and voice recorders. I think a camera in the back will face some serious HIPAA challenges.
  20. No when I clicked on the words design ideas it linked me out to the crate and barrel site. see below screenshot This is what I get when I click the words design ideas - it sends me to crate and barrel's site. Me thinks that wasn't the purpose but maybe again it was.
  21. If I am reading the flow chart correctly you have 2 options one is retaking the whole course the other is Remediation with an ambulance service director or another person in a similar position who can attest u have the skills mastered. Candidate must complete a new, state-approved EMT Education Program OR Receive Remediation through Education Program Medical Director or Ambulance Service Medical Director and verifies the candidate's psychomotor skill proficiency. This is documented on a form provided by the EMSRB.
  22. Does your agency require PALS or PEPP or other pediatric course? Does your agency have pediatric equipment?
  23. Oui c est plus top l échographie cardiaque confirme souvant le temponnade ou péricardite...mortelles
  24. Lifestar Chicago is hiring Flight Paramedics! APPLY ONLINE AT https://bit.ly/2BJjgKV Job Details Description Responsible for providing high quality pre-hospital advanced life support including assessment, triage, and treatment utilizing standards and guidelines established by Air Methods Community Based Services (CBS) Medical Director(s). You’ll be responsible for carrying out the mission and goals of Air Methods CBS assuring that safety remains the highest priority throughout the transport continuum. Essential Functions and Responsibilities: Provides pre-hospital advanced life support care from the initial contact until patient care is relinquished to the accepting medical facility; maintains thorough patient care documentation. Practices within his/her scope of practice as defined by the states regulating each base and Air Methods CBS. Maintains competency in knowledge and psychomotor skills by participating in ongoing laboratory and clinical experiences. Communicates educational needs to the Medical Base Supervisor and Medical Education Coordinator. Maintains documentation of required licensure, certifications, continuing education, aviation and safety training, OSHA and HIPAA training, clinical rotations, and advanced procedures. Attends minimum of six educational programs per year pertinent to his/her practice. Knowledgeable in use and routine maintenance of all equipment and supplies used by Air Methods CBS. Responsible for reporting medical equipment failures and taking initial steps to insure repair of equipment as directed. Maintains adequate supplies onboard aircraft to deliver patient care. Keeps aircraft clean and orderly to insure rapid response to all transport requests. Participates in patient and referring institution follow-up and planned outreach marketing and education activities. Functions as a medical flight member by attending pre-mission briefings and mission debriefings and completes necessary documentation. Assists in pre-mission liftoff checklist and assists pilot as requested, i.e., radio, navigational, and visual observation activities. Complies with safety standards to assure safety of self, medical personnel, patient, and equipment. Conducts aircraft safety briefings as needed. Serves as a flight resource to neonatal/pediatric personnel when transporting specialty patients by helicopter. Performs advanced skills and procedures as approved by Air Methods CBS Medical Director(s). Serves as a role model, educator and clinical resource. Participates regularly in departmental activities, projects and committees (to include research and publishing opportunities). Maintains awareness of current issues related to pre-hospital care through participation in professional activities, i.e., national, state legislative--elected or appointed. Other Duties as assigned. Education & Experience High school diploma or general education degree (GED) and at least three years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience Minimum three (3) years’ recent experience in a busy 911 system Previous critical care transport and flight experience preferred Skills Skills as required to practice as a paramedic as defined by assigned state scope of practice and advanced practice skills as defined by Medical Director(s) and Medical Standards. Maintains positive interpersonal relationships with colleagues, EMS representatives, hospitals and the public while executing strong interpersonal skills and a high degree of collaboration at all levels Demonstrates high critical thinking and reasoning skills and strong attention to detail while working in a fast paced environment that requires ability to prioritize and multi-task Ability to work a flexible schedule including 24 hour shifts, overtime, and an on-call rotation Dependable and self-motivated while working in a frequently changing environment. Excellent communication and presentation skills, both written and verbal Computer Skills Proficient with Microsoft Suite, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook Certificates, Licenses, Registrations Registered EMT-P licensed in state(s) served National Certification may be required to meet state licensure requirements Specialty certification: (FP-C or CCP-C) required within two (2) years of hire Current certifications in Healthcare Provider BLS/CPR; ACLS; PALS or equivalent (AHA courses if state or county required) and advanced provider ITLS or PHTLS (if state or country required) Advance trauma course: one (1) of the following is acceptable: TNCC, ATLS/ATCN, TNATC or CAMTS-approved advanced trauma course prior ro completion of third-rider status (Please note advanced skills lab must accompany all of the above mentioned advanced trauma courses) NRP certification prior ro completion of third-rider status NIMS Training IS 100, 200, 700, 800 and HazMat upon hire Air Methods is an EEO/AA employer. Qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status. Qualifications Education Required High School or better. Licenses & Certifications Required Drivers License Equal Opportunity Employer/Protected Veterans/Individuals with Disabilities The contractor will not discharge or in any other manner discriminate against employees or applicants because they have inquired about, discussed, or disclosed their own pay or the pay of another employee or applicant. However, employees who have access to the compensation information of other employees or applicants as a part of their essential job functions cannot disclose the pay of other employees or applicants to individuals who do not otherwise have access to compensation information, unless the disclosure is (a) in response to a formal complaint or charge, (b) in furtherance of an investigation, proceeding, hearing, or action, including an investigation conducted by the employer, or (c) consistent with the contractor’s legal duty to furnish information.
  25. Yes the degree will be your issue. Most of the companies that I have worked with will not talk with you unless you have the degree. I'm not sure why. If you can do the job without the degree then why do you need a degree.
  26. Start with an EMT basic class and go on more ride-alongs. I took first responder and EMT-B when I was in High School and really loved the challenge which got me to where I am now. But I will say this, you get out of it what you put into it. We all start somewhere. Best of luck
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