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  1. Last week
  2. I received an email recently directly from a private company to do FEMA covid vaccinations. Supposedly they will offer me jobs within 50 miles of where I live. But there are some odd requirements. They only want copies of all of my certs and my DL. No actual job application. I did finally find out that once they accept you, they notify you of a position by text. You have two hours to respond and accept it. After doing that, you have 12 hours to complete a slew of online requirements like FEMA paperwork, classes, I-9 form, and finally their application form to work for them. The compa
  3. Earlier
  4. Kmedic82

    The Sodium Trap

    An excellent read by FOAMFrat. An introduction to fluid resuscitation and cautions there of. https://www.foamfratblog.com/post/the-sodium-trap?fbclid=IwAR2dwx-AvRSw8gBB1GyPpl_Rwp2c-HeAc3-k6wkmxZ5jTFIioAjA9jSmrfY_aem_AcRQYH3b3e3NdPGZHu20QhrQnf7RGfqFKEh7PwwGIFcvOALtfrFuWkUV2uvPLy3exw9EHKNaxVvuCFKp1IMEiB2WHZSMmKFHfHCkdFHKwweZSw View the full article
  5. This podcast is a panel discussion from providers in Australia. Their EMS sounds like light years ahead of where I work. They utilize blood products, plasma, and can activate a trauma OR. It’s amazing to hear what other places are doing. Especially when you feel lost in your own career and wish to see your service progress. Please give it a listen and tell me what you think! TLDR (or didn’t listen): lives can be saved if all departments work together! RAGE Podcast – Resuscitology: Bleeding Patients View the full article
  6. Advanced airways in EMS are in heated debate today. There are two extremes. Give it or cut it. Some medical directors are granting crews RSI (rapid sequence intubation) in the field. While others are cutting intubation as a whole and utilizing devices like the iGel. There are so many combinations of medications you can use for induction in a chemically assisted intubation. The one that was recently brought to my attention was Ketamine. Ketamine has been a wonder drug in EMS. It has been beneficial in taking down the giant muscled bound tweeker that’s fighting a gaggle of police office
  7. I took a break from ems back before COVID, but recently just got hired as a paramedic by the DOD. Obviously COVID is still rampant but calls still have to be ran.
  8. I am looking for a small Ambulance Service for sale going out of business or what everywhere. Or a town who need a Service.
  9. Just got an email from the City of Pittsburgh saying that I can sign up to take the "Civil Service performance examination for Paramedic". (I applied around half a year ago.) What is this exam? Is it math? Is it body mechanics? Is it about city codes? Is it everything? I haven't been able to find anything about it online. Anybody have an idea?
  10. I just read an article on FireRescue that said that San Antonio is looking to purchase an "armored medical vehicle" for the agency. What are your thoughts about armored vehicles? Is your department seeking one? https://www.firerescue1.com/fire-products/specialty-vehicles/articles/san-antonio-looking-to-buy-armored-ems-vehicle-for-fd-VVglt8cuZEedUfxi/?fbclid=IwAR2epvyNOsUJosfgJe98brOqc3OOv0Zwih3Iq_pWdKBh8XizR74enqOU3WI
  11. FireMedicChick your reply is top notch and makes an entire lot of sense to me, mainly when mentioning nasal cannula. Would it be honest to say that the usage of nasal cannula is usually recommended while the affected person has lots of mouth secretions like this website? What approximately using both nasal cannula AND oxygen masks? Is that even possible?
  12. Hello everyone, I have a question regarding law enforcement dealings with unresponsive patients at the scene. For background on myself, I successfully completed the EMT-B course at TEEX in College Station, Texas back in 2010, but never actually worked as an EMT. The training was a requirement for a contract in Iraq. So what are the rules regarding police moving an unresponsive patient that's in no imminent danger. I realize that some departments have EMT trained and licensed officers, but what I witnessed from the officers was complete incompetency at the least, or an attempt to cover their tr
  13. Back in 2004 the service I was with started with Panasonic Tough Books, but we only used it as our CAD Link and mapping device. When I came on to the service I'm at now, we started using them for E PCR and mapping. We switched from those to the Panasonic Toughbook CF18, which was just a tablet, that you could attach a key board to via a docking station. They weren't user friendly or all that tough given it's. We switched to the CF 33 Toughbook that has a detachable keyboard and we use it for all our documentation, CAD Link and mapping. They are user friendly and fairly tough. We had all our tr
  14. I love it when a plan comes together. The heart of the concept is minimizing cerebral oxygen demand while maintaining a sufficient cerebral perfusion pressure and flow for tissue oxygenation. Assuming an ICP of 20mmHg, it would take a MAP of 80mmHg to maintain a CPP of 60mmHg (I bet MAP guidelines for the management of TBI are suddenly making more sense). Some sedative/analgesic medications balance those considerations better than others. This brings in the concept of flow metabolic coupling (Propofol is particularly good at this as sedative agents go). Agent's with good flow metabolic couplin
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