Jump to content

Just Conent

Showing all content posted in for the last 365 days.

This stream auto-updates

  1. Earlier
  2. AK, I'll admit, I haven't been around nearly as much as I used to be, but each and every one of my friends here is very special to me. I can totally relate to the situation you're in, as I continually wrestle with the same conundrum each renewal cycle. My COPD isn't going to get any better and it's getting harder and harder to hump gear. Please know that you've been instrumental in the shaping of many careers, and at the same time, sent a bunch of 'hacks and quacks' packing back to the locker room. Remember that even if you do let the EMT-P license go, you've got a lot of friends here, and your knowledge of our craft will always be invaluable. Besides, where would some of these 'wet behind the ears, know nothing, snot nosed EMT's be without 'Old Road Dogs' like us, whacking them with our canes once in a while?
  3. Sorry. For some reason, I wasn't getting any notifications. Thanks. Taken care of. 👍
  4. So many familiar faces - so many great friends from long ago. many have come and gone. many have gone forever - gone to the EMS systems in the sky. Good to see you all come back to say hello.
  5. Anyone in here use the Ram Promaster type II van ambulances? I'm curious how well they hold up, how medics like them compared to other makes.
  6. So, I am a paramedic program director (have been for a couple years now) Some of you who remember me from few years back will know I started out in the fire service, got my paramedic, and did rural EMS before landing into EMS education. I just want to make it clear I didn't go directly into education without paying my dues in field time. I think this is a bad move for NREMT. It adds a loss of trust to hold EMS certifications in a higher standing as well as a loss of trust that they are acting in good faith. Let me explain why. If you look at most any other healthcare profession, whether that be nursing, PA, NP, respiratory therapy, radiology technician, etc. They are all accredited programs and you have to be accredited by their one or multiple accreditors before you are even thought about being allowed to test. Accreditation means that you get reviewed every so many years (CoAEMSP which is the EMS accreditor through CAAHEP, does their reviews every 5 years with annual reporting every year). This site visit and comprehensive review makes sure that you are holding to the minimum standard expected by CAAHEP and if you aren't, what you need to do to get yourself straightened out. CoAEMSP luckily is not a hard-ass committee on accreditation that wants to immediately punish you and revoke your stuff because you missed something, but they act in good faith that they will inform you of your missing areas and give you time to get it straightened out and assist you in doing so if you ask. The current NREMT requirement of CAAHEP accreditation makes sure that all paramedic programs are at least meeting those standards. One of the biggest standards is that the programs are held accountable to what they require of students as well as mandating that programs do continuous internal reviews of their programs to improve them every time. This is hugely beneficial for programs in general but also improves our education and end level competency for our paramedics who are entering the field to start filling holes set forth. How can this be seen as acting in bad faith? I see it as an act of bad faith because it makes all the work and stress of programs who had to meet and maintain the CAAHEP accreditation requirements and the money and time spent to do it a waste. Accreditation is expensive, especially initially getting accredited, whether that is going through CAAHEP programmatic accreditation or starting with institutional accreditation and then getting programmatic. It is also a huge time investment for the programs. Especially when you look at program directors. We see about a quarter of program directors leave the position each year in paramedic programs, a lot of the time due to the stress and hell that the job can be from time to time. Also, I don't think we do a great job prepping our program directors to transition well from EMS providers to program directors, but that is a different Ted Talk. NREMT made this requirement with a hard deadline all programs must meet (again some just needing to get programmatic accreditation while some had to get institutional accreditation then programmatic accreditation as you cannot get programmatic accreditation without institutional). This was done with the expectation, belief, and faith that NREMT would not back down from this requirement and it would hold true to that mandate. They started this requirement to mandate full CAAHEP accreditation or letter of review (meaning in process of gaining programmatic accreditation) as of January 1, 2013. We are now less than 10 years or two site visit cycles away from that decision and suddenly they have decided to back away from that mandate. It is hard to demand our profession be respected, paid better, and recognized as the profession we should be when our own certification agency is willing to drop standards and burn all the programs that have been working to obtain, meet, and maintain these standards. I hate the comparison of EMS to nursing as its apples and oranges, but EMS and NREMT need to pull their head out of their asses and keep the accreditation requirements they have adopted just as all other healthcare professions have before us. Once you go back to "state approved", its hard to say what standards those students are being held to cause there may not be a third-party double checking them.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...