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Observing/Ride alongs?

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Out here our EMT students are required to do 48 hrs in the ER, 24 in the OR for BIAD's (mostly LMA's) and no less than 45 calls on ambulance practicum. And here it is not just riding 3rd and assisting, you have to be running the call unless you are with an ALS service and the calls requires a higher level of care. Then you tell the medic what you would do in the BLS areas and assistup to your scope (IV, Bagging etc).

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How different it is all over the globe.

In my country the EMTs have to complete 200 hrs classroom plus 160 hrs education in a hospital in ER, OR and ICU and 160 hrs hands-on training on the ambulance.

The Paramedics do 720 hrs classroom plus 480 hrs education in a hospital in ER, OR and ICU and 1,600 hrs training on the ambulance with a supervising EMS-Instructor.

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Wow, no clinical time, that is just not right! We had to do 24 hours in the ER and 24 on the rig for basic. For EMT I we had to do a combined 24 in lab/ER had to a minimum number of sticks, can't remember for sure, 24 in the OR, had to have at least 8 or ten intubations and 24 ride along. Can't remember the exact amount of sticks and intubations, been a few years. State didn't require that many intubations but our instructor did. I don't understand the whole no clinical time.

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And now we wonder why our system is so screwed up ?.....

How horrible a program is that offers no clinical time as well as a state that does not mandate. I know most facilities now consider Basic EMT as observation only clinicals due to their limited abilities. But, even exposure is a good thing, and learning off exposure can be helpful.

I personally, would wish that clinical time would equal or surpass classroom time... yes > 100 hrs for basics...

I do chuckle when in comparison of clinical time... when I hear students describe hours, and I describe my clinical time in years.

Be safe,

R/R 911

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Hey all..! long time no see wow the site has really changed since my last post a year ago..i think

well anyway regarding ride along here in drugloard heaven(Tijuana Mexico) we have to do 100 hr ED and 200 ambulance or 100 calls now we can only start doing them after we complete the course now it used to be you ride along watch, learn and sometimes assist taking vitals and stuff

but now you the "student" are give your sword and your shield and told " go kick some @ss" which i totally disagree cus every new emt , or maybe its just me get freaked on there first calls you do have a instructor with you but he is only there to take charge if you screw things up or if you get stuck but in the mean time you have to make a fool of your self in front of the pt, relative,cops, other emts and unwanted guest In my opinion rookies should have a few ride along to see how the "experience" emts handle the situation.

Well that's my Little grain of salt to the conversation, its good to be back here i see alot of new people, ......and what ever happened to that guy that posted his naked pic with a cowboy hat on his what ever the heck that was....?

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As for clinical times, for basics we were required to do 24 hours in the er and were encouraged to do more. We had to have a minium of four transports during our time on an ambulance. We were encouraged to do as much as we could and ride with several different crews. Medic students have to spend so much time/have a certain number of skills in each of the hospital departments that they are rotated through in several of the area hospitals and they spent almost 6 months working on an ambulance, approximately 5 days a week. They have to have skills checked off and have done a certain number of each skill before they can be cleared.

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In the service where I worked, we were contracted with the EMS program to have student riders. They were required to complete run reports (no patient names) for their class and they were evaluated and the crew as mentors were also evaluated by the students. We also were allowed to have observers provided they signed a release form.

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The school that I'm attending REQUIRES (these are minimum requirements) 48 hours Ambo( or 40 and 8 with fire rig who are first responders here) 40 in ED and 8 Labor and Delivery( Must witness at least one natural childbirth or redo shift) Like I said these are just minimum requirements. They really would like you to do more if you are able. We also have to document ALL pt contact, mentor surveys, student evals, you must also do skills check offs. (vitals, bandaging splinting, CPR, 02 admin NRB BVM etc. You must conduct Equipment check of rig you are riding in. They make us carry notebook to document all of this. If you don't get enough ride time, ED time etc. they will make you repeat clinicals portion of next class. Some of the precepts make you really do it. Some prefer you to watch and some tell you that when you ready to handle get in and show em what you've got. They want us to give Pt reports to ED staff. Make Pt reports on radio show you can use 911 mapbook. My preceptor even had me get equipment ready enroute to call. Lifepack, airway bag, drug box etc. Whatever I thought we'd need. I was only wrong once and it was because I picked up one thing he didn't think we'd need. It's not easy but it was well worth it. I feel like every student from Basic to medic should do a lot more rideout time. I learned a bunch. It's also a chance to see what you've got if you've got jitters you've got someone there to take over if you lose it.

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It's actually more common than you realize, for EMS not to do any ride along or clinical time. At least on the basic level.

The only thing that scares me is the First Responder. In Pennsylvania, they are permitted to do nearly everything the basic does, except administer the BLS meds. While Epi and Oxygen are allowed. Yet, the class is 60 hours shorter than basic, and they have no plans to require them to learn their skills. It's like a first aid class. Read, watch, quick ABC test, here's your card.

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