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bandaidpatrol

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  1. That was a sin! Ruining that great old 59 Caddy! Those Bastards!
  2. Have they released the Scope of Practive for that yet? I'd like to see if it's the same as the Ambulance-EMT-Advanced that we had over thirty years ago.
  3. Linoleum. Didn't last for shit, and stained real easy. Mainly because if there was something on it, you couldn't see it. Only in a combination did you have a neutral floor color. No commercial car (ambulance) that I ever worked in had anything but a dark, patterened floor. If you wanted something else, it had to be ordered before the body was built. Incidently, the brown and orange checkered floor in the 75 Criterion I worked in for years, was the exact same I had installed in my kitchen at home....
  4. There is a .jpg. You didn't highlight the entire link. If you right-click, properties, the 77patient.jpg and 77cad.jpg is cut off, so you have to drag the highlight thing down farther. http://michigan-ems.tripod.com/sitebuilder...s/77patient.jpg http://michigan-ems.tripod.com/sitebuilder...tures/77cad.jpg
  5. Looks fine to me. Can't do anything about that. Guess you can draw a picture of an ambulance on your screen and color it in with crayons if need be.
  6. What's that supposed to mean? This is an example of Cotillion White and Omaha Orange, inside and outside. So I used a stock photo from a website. No need to be a smart ass. Certainly better than this crap below. Really Ugly ambulance, a sin
  7. Cotillion White and Omaha Orange were the colors specified for many ambulances in the late 70's.
  8. Same thing that would happen if they were all tied up and had another run... Call Mutual Aid.
  9. Don't know about you, but I charged to use my hearses as ambulances! We had so many emergencies, we even began to run and buy units that were made to be used as JUST ambulances. Started out as ten or fifteen bucks a pop, then up to fifty by the end of that era. Why did I quit? I was paying people to run the ambulance, more than EMT's were making in the 80's. But people stopped paying round about 78-79. The state gave me 10% of the bill if an elderly person didn't pay. I made 35% off the county if someone didn't pay for a funeral. It was just a hassle. So it went from a paid service run by
  10. Unless a patient was in dire need of surgery, the attempt at limb reattachment, had signs of internal bleeding or was unconscious.. They went to the nearest place medical care was available, sort of like today. Only that meant a doctors home or office. Honestly, if they were dead, and the hospital was more than a half hour away, we just took them back to the funeral parlor. The nearest big hospital was over two hours by road, there were no choppers till after 1970, then it was a big mess getting one. Nearest hospital was about as big as our home, and they were outfitted with probably the oldes
  11. I tend to disconcur with your view of history. I hope that's not part of this report... To sum it up, as an ambulance attendant in "the 60's", we did the best we could with what we had. Industry was just not on our side yet. We grew out of several professions; battle field surgeons, barbers, home nursing and funeral directors. Battle field surgeons and medics and corpsmen created the procedures that we use today; barbers were often the only persons available to provide stoppage of bleeding-less surgeons on battlefields hundreds of years ago, nurses riding to hospitals with ill patients i
  12. There already are 52 levels of EMS training, why not add a couple more... :roll:
  13. We would ask for an insurance or assistance card, both, so as to not make the patient feel that we are making an assumption. Either way, they would sign a paper stating that our billing agency could bill what ever insurance program they have, or send them the bill. Whether or not they could pay, did make a difference, that was my pay check. Someone has to pay no matter what. Either their insurance, the state, medicare, or out of their pocket.
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