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DFIB

Grandpa has a gun!

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I perceive the problem as why the heck is this thread even created. It is a non issue. Unconscious, really dead patient with a licensed firearm on their person why is it even being brought up. Secure the firearm just like you do any other possessions of your patient and go on. Some mentioned firearms not being allowed on the ambulance, so if you find it after moving patient to ambulance just secure as mentioned previous sentence. Again non issue. People use some common sense.

The thread was created out of curiosity as to the different opinions and practices put forth and applied in a industry that bridges many different, countries and cultures. It was put forth in a forum frequented by professionals that work in these countries and cultures. The differences could be vast.

Why does this irritate you?

I wonder how so many "experts" end up accidentally shooting themselves, family members and friends when they have handled their gun many times.

Just because a random person unsafely handles a firearm in no way means that the next person will. There are millions of people in the USA alone that are in direct contact and handle firearms every waking moment of their day. Are you wondering why there aren't millions of firearm accidents perpetrated by these people?

I am not sure what you are wondering?

...because they fail to follow the simple rules for handling firearms. Yes, I never fail to follow the handful of simple rules for handling firearms because I take firearms deadly serious, even though my primary purpose of using firearms is for fun (trap shooting).

I have always shot for fun, preparing for the day I have to shoot for another reason.

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It Depends.

Assuming I had time (i.e. the guy is on the gurney, I'm not doing CPR or anything,) and assuming it was a gun that I am familiar with (Such as a 1911 in 9mm) I would probably clear the firearm and place it in its holster (if easily removable) probably somewhere in the front of the ambulance.

If its a gun that I am not familiar with, I'd probably leave it in its holster, and secure it someplace in the front of the ambulance

I have always shot for fun, preparing for the day I have to shoot for another reason..

Well said, DFIB, well said.

Edited by Stitches

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I would remove it in the holster, transport the patient and turn it over to Security once at the Hospital.

In regards to what Miss Pee Pee has said first of all, are you saying that you would delay transport of the patient to wait 15 minutes for the LEO to get there? If not what are your plans for the gun? I would agree that if you are unfamiliar with the gun or "scared of it", that you are the last person who should be handling it..maybe your partner is more confident?

The OP's question was not about illicit or illegal goods being transported in your Ambulance. I'm not saying that anyone's opinion here is wrong, I'm saying that if you are going to make absolute remarks like "Never, and Period" you might want to justify your response more effectively than throwing up Cocaine or Porn.

Just my .02

AC

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No one seems to be able to say with any certainty if shocking someone is enough to set off the gun. I would not want to be the n=1 to test either hypothesis. Don't take the chance and just remove the gun. Let's also not forget that in this situation there will be a lot going on and the potential for the gun to get bumped into and banged around. I have minimal experience with firearms so I would not be comfortable clearing it. I know enough not pull the trigger. Keep it holstered it lock it in a closet, pointing outward and away from the O2.

HLPP, if your policy is 100% no guns in the ambulance, does your company require that every pt get a pat-down prior to transport? If so, who does it and what do they do with the weapons once they are found? There is also a difference between a loaded weapon and cocaine/porn. The first has the potential to kill, the others do not, you cannot compare the two. Either way, if I found them on the pt in the OP instead of a gun, they will be secured and turned over to LEO at the hospital. I don't think I would give either to security.

Edited by ERDoc

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ERDoc..I meant to answer. I cannot say for sure if it is an issue or not. My gut reaction based on what I have read or know about AED's is that it would NOT be a problem, however, it is better to be safe than sorry, and would be good to just get it off the patient and stored safely.

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No one seems to be able to say with any certainty if shocking someone is enough to set off the gun. I would not want to be the n=1 to test either hypothesis.

And excellent suggestion .. Hello Mythbusters .

Edited by tniuqs

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We had an officer collapse a few years ago at the yearly Marathon, immediately defibed by one of our Bike Medics w/AED, no weapon discharge and immediate ROSC

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There were 52,447 deliberate and 23,237 accidental non-fatal gunshot injuries in the United States during 2000.[4]

63 injuries per day does not speak well for the "experts" who shoot themselves.

http://en.wikipedia....e_United_StatesP.S. that is just injuries, not deaths.

Edited by hatelilpeepees

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And excellent suggestion .. Hello Mythbusters .

They did do a test showing modern versions of nitro patch do not explode when patient is shocked.

In most cases patients firearm would actually be insulated from the shock by the holster and the primer on modern ammunition is not easy to set off accidental.

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There were 52,447 deliberate and 23,237 accidental non-fatal gunshot injuries in the United States during 2000.[4]

63 injuries per day does not speak well for the "experts" who shoot themselves.

http://en.wikipedia....e_United_StatesP.S. that is just injuries, not deaths.

Well you would have to remove the stat of deliberate in this situation, then your study was from 2000. kinda of dated.

If one does the math against the number of firearms on record and handled daily I believe a different result would occur.

I am enjoying that you have turned the page a bit .. I certainly hope you continue with a more evidence based debate.

Point in fact the firearm was located on the patient the question posed was what would YOU do.

cheers

Edited by tniuqs

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