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need the lowdown on this.......NREMT "thing".

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I am in need of a primer concerning the NREMT. Imagine you're me....okay well let's not go there, but imagine the only thing you know about it is what NREMT stands for, and that in the final days of EMT certification, your instructor says it's easy and administered at a computer testing center in downtown (insert name of city i live in). Well from what scant info i have been able to glean, it's distinctly not easy and costs about $90 to take. I ask these questions ONLY as they pertain to EMT-Bs, not paramedics. So who administers or "owns" the test? Is it question-for-question the same in every state? Is it an attempt at-or the kernel of-what will eventually become a nationally adopted EMT testing standard? Is there a practical aspect to it? Is it administered and taken entirely sitting in front of a computer? How long does it take and how many questions does it comprise? Is it the standard test for any states as of yet or will it be soon? If you'e taken the FISDAP skills test, is this harder? And compared to most state EMT certification tests, is the NREMT harder? I'm outta here, thanks! Jeff

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I strongly suggest you go to the website and do some research. It actually contains good information and may answer many of your questions. Good luck.

http://www.nremt.org/

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I'll do that, but i like to get both the official line on something like this as well as the inside skinny. Can u tell me the skinny portion? That's why i asked here. Tnx

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The nremt is a national standard.

The skills part must be passed first as part of your class, but that part is state standard.

The questions are different from person to person, but the bank of questions is the same. I could have taken the test in any state that offered but live near three bordering States and was able to go to any of them to test.

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The national registry is a test writing organization.

They don't even administer the test anymore. Pearson provides the testing service for fee.

This allows the states to give a test that they don't have to develop , administer or keep updated.

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I will tell you this, it is worthless unless you plan to move around a lot.

NREMT does not license you to do anything. you are licensed by a state to work in that state.

when you move, you have to apply to the new state. and some states recognize NREMT and you don't have to go through their requirements.

Some states will take your home state cert the same way.

I am licensed in NY. NJ and PA licenses obtained 100% by reciprocity of NY, I did not need the NREMT. If you go to each state's EMS website, you will see which states where NREMT will come in handy for you.

Cheers.

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I will tell you this, it is worthless unless you plan to move around a lot.

NREMT does not license you to do anything. you are licensed by a state to work in that state.

when you move, you have to apply to the new state. and some states recognize NREMT and you don't have to go through their requirements.

Some states will take your home state cert the same way.

I am licensed in NY. NJ and PA licenses obtained 100% by reciprocity of NY, I did not need the NREMT. If you go to each state's EMS website, you will see which states where NREMT will come in handy for you.

Cheers.

Uhh...except the states that require NREMT for initial certification... EMT's also aren't licensed I believe, they are certified.

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/> I will tell you this, it is worthless unless you plan to move around a lot.

NREMT does not license you to do anything. you are licensed by a state to work in that state.

when you move, you have to apply to the new state. and some states recognize NREMT and you don't have to go through their requirements.

Some states will take your home state cert the same way.

I am licensed in NY. NJ and PA licenses obtained 100% by reciprocity of NY, I did not need the NREMT. If you go to each state's EMS website, you will see which states where NREMT will come in handy for you.

Cheers.

46 states use the National Registry tests as their standard. To say it is a waste of time is a bit foolish.I did not have another test of any kind besides my NREMT. I took that, got my results and hours after getting my resume?ts I was active on my states website and had a state ID EMT number. I was then able to run EMT. A few weeks later I got my state issued EMT card.

You can test at any of those 46 States and expect to get similar questions. The parts that may differ are the skills tests.

/> Uhh...except the states that require NREMT for initial certification... EMT's also aren't licensed I believe, they are certified.

Iowa is one that requires it for initial certification.

I don't know about the cert/licensing title. Not a huge deal to me, but when I got it I was told I was now licensed to practice. Yet my card said certified. It seems its used hand in hand. I say certified, but others say licensed. *shrugs*

Edited by MariB
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I don't know about the cert/licensing title. Not a huge deal to me, but when I got it I was told I was now licensed to practice. Yet my card said certified. It seems its used hand in hand. I say certified, but others say licensed. *shrugs*

The two words are not really interchangeable as they both have different meanings and implications both professionally and legally.

Conveniently, NREMT has a page that discusses this very topic.

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I just applied for my CO nursing license not that long ago. On it, I did not report my EMT-I/99 certification I had held in Maryland. This is because the question asked for a list of any previously held licenses in other states. I did not have a license, I had a certification. They are very different.

The link Mike posted is very helpful but here's a brief on the difference...

EMS has a scope of practice defined by their medical director. There is no legal scope defined for EMS providers, just that of what the medical director approves of under their license.

The nurse practice act, a legal document in every state, defines the legal scope of practice a nurse can have.

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