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Introduction with some questions.


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Hey ya'll! I'm Jessica.

I am currently majoring in political science and I am starting to lose taste for it. It was my original dream to get into law; although it seems like it is no longer the wonderful of a metier that it once was (or at least made out to be). So I was thinking about a major change!

A little background:

For a couple summers (note: a few years back) I volunteered in an ER and really enjoyed it. I was able to do little things here and there that I thought was fun (sort of corny sharing with EMTs/Paramedics) such as placing pulse oximeters, placing the blood pressure cuffs, and most importantly the enjoyment talking with the patients. I would suppose you could say I was a dilettante since it was something for a brief time and still had my eyes set on law at the current time.

My uncle is currently a paramedic in Sacramento (other-side of the country than I) and hearing some stories from him over thanksgiving got me thinking. A little secret to also sparking the interest again was watching that corny show 'sirens' that used to air for a little bit of time. So needless to say I am interested in it again.

Getting to the questions:

I'll start with the most important one. Are there certain laws that disqualify people from becoming paramedics if they have certain mental issues? I am not saying I am a super crazy person (just out there for the record). For I am not getting too deep into my personal past I was involved in a bad accident at a young age. Sometimes I have re-accruing nightmares, and every few months or so have a small brief anxiety attack which is quickly controlled with medication. I take .5 Xanax two times a day (when I awake and before I fall asleep) and one or two additional if I feel an anxiety attack starting. The medication doesn't effect my daily lifestyles in any way. Just something else for the record is I don't lose my mind if I have an anxiety attack (unlike some horror stories I have heard). I just become moderately skittish, cold, shaky, and nauseated.

How's the job outlook and hiring process? Such as how competitive are most paramedic positions (I am willing to travel) and are the interviews oral board like, practical, both, or varying on the agency?

I am going to try and request for a ride-a-long in the near future with my local EMS agency. What is the proper etiquette during a ride-a-long? I sort of know the basics such as dress modestly but don't over do it and keep out of their way during calls. Is bringing food in okay? (always brought bagels in during an internship with a law firm; it did put me on their good side) and assisting them with minor things such as helping carrying things around?

Thanks for taking your time going over this!

- Jessica

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For starters welcome to EMTCity.

Now to go directly to the nitty gritty. Depending on the nature of your traumatic experience, working as a paramedic could place you in situations that will stir up old traumas of your own. I would advise you to seriously consider the ramifications of a potential severe panic attack on your life and the lives of those you care about. All that said, I love the job and wish you all the best in exploring whether or not you are suited to the work.

If you find you're still interested in medicine but don't feel you're suited to working as a paramedic, fret not. There are numerous interesting and valuable aspects of healthcare for you to pursue that don't involve situations as easily personalized.

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Welcome. It sounds like you are somewhere on the east coast, which could be a good thing. There is probably a volley squad somewhere near you. This would be a great way to find out how you will react to bad situations before making a career choice. If medicine is something you love, but find that situations in the field bother you, look into a career in the hospital/office. We don't see nearly half the bad shit that is seen in the field and it is a much more controlled environment once you are out of the ER.

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Hi my name is Jeffrey I am an EMT-B in MN I am Persuing a career as a paramedic. After I get my EMT-P, I want to work as a flight paramedic. I will be doing BLS internship after the new year since I am still unemployed as an EMT-B. My college requires at least 100 hours of patient runs as an EMT-B. Patient care has been my passion since high school. I cannot wait to start this rewarding and somewhat stressful career in EMS!?

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For starters welcome to EMTCity.

Now to go directly to the nitty gritty. Depending on the nature of your traumatic experience, working as a paramedic could place you in situations that will stir up old traumas of your own. I would advise you to seriously consider the ramifications of a potential severe panic attack on your life and the lives of those you care about. All that said, I love the job and wish you all the best in exploring whether or not you are suited to the work.

If you find you're still interested in medicine but don't feel you're suited to working as a paramedic, fret not. There are numerous interesting and valuable aspects of healthcare for you to pursue that don't involve situations as easily personalized.

It is something that I have put serious thought in about going on calls and having that experience come up. It would put me in a bad spot and most importantly could effect the patient. The one positive thing I see out of it is I have yet to find a thing that triggers the panic attacks. So far they seem pretty random.

Welcome. It sounds like you are somewhere on the east coast, which could be a good thing. There is probably a volley squad somewhere near you. This would be a great way to find out how you will react to bad situations before making a career choice. If medicine is something you love, but find that situations in the field bother you, look into a career in the hospital/office. We don't see nearly half the bad shit that is seen in the field and it is a much more controlled environment once you are out of the ER.

Sadly no volley squad :thumbsdown: . This is why I am scheduling ride-a-longs with the local medics. Other options in medicine are also sort of being considered; I just wanted a take on being a paramedic in my condition from current medics.

Thanks guys!

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  • 2 weeks later...

welcome to the city.

The best advice as to whether you can obtain a license to practice in your state based on your medical issue & medication usage , would be to contact your state EMS office and ask them directly.

Some conditions are a deterrent , others are not.

Don't give up hope of finding a life calling you will enjoy

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