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EMT-B Skills final...help!

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Hey guys, just became a member today, first post. hopefully i'm in the right place. i apologize in advance if it's not, i'm a little short on time!

Anyways, i recently finished my fire science classes at Mission College in santa clara, CA. i'm now finishing up the EMT-B class at Foothill College. We have finals next week. We are going to be tested on Pre hospital Child birth, spinal immobilization, helmet removal, hare/sager traction splint. First, i would like to ask that anyone who has been tested on these skills post up any pointers tips tricks or hints, as to remembering these skills. obviously i will be practicing and studying, but i find that people who have been working in the field for awhile have their own tricks to remember what to do for each of these skills.

Second question is this: i have googled and looked around, but cannot find a video or post about how to properly secure a patient on a board using the upper/lower box method? i've talked to a few emt buddies and they say they use spider straps and don't use this method? unfortunately, for testing purposes, we have to do what is on the packet. I only got to practice this skill once in class, so i'm not feeling very confident. please help! again, main concern with the spinal immobilization skill is the upper/lower box strapping technique. thanks guys!

Danny

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Posted · Report post

Welcome.

Field tricks to remember certain skills are not useful in a testing situation. Practical testing looks for you to be able to function off of a check list and is not always an accurate representation of what is done in the field. Find the section of your text (preferable) or your notes (not as preferable), or if you have the checklists themselves (best), and reference those particular skills. Your book would be best as if there's a problem you can always open the book and point to the text book answer.

I've never heard of the upper/lower box method. Good luck with that.

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Posted · Report post

Is there a time you can schedule with the instructor to go over that skill? Seems odd that you would be tested on something you were only given one opportunity to try. Other than that I echo Mike in that memorizing the check-off is your best bet besides more practice.s

Good luck and welcome :)

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Posted · Report post

For testing purposes go by what the book says. The real world is much different and if you tried to copy what we do in the field you would fail.

I have never heard of the "box method" before. I am assuming they are referring to crossing the straps across the chest to better secure the patient.

We use whatever Seattle Fire Dept has attached to their boards at the time. They want us using their boards and their equipment so that is what we do. Sometimes they have 6 straps attached, other times they have a spider strap. We train and practice in both.

Best advice I will give you for testing purposes is always check CMS before and after.

The testing sounds stressful but in reality shouldn't cause you to worry. You should have a copy of the critical fails that you can review. Don't do those and you will be fine. Remember to verbalize.

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Verbalizing is always a tough one to remember, especially with students that get test anxiety. It happens to me.

I find myself in a very unusual position now as a prehospital EMS Educator, and also as an EMT student once again. It has been over 20 years since I was an EMT student for the first time, and all of those nerves and jitters are back again.

I remember the first time during the finals testing week, I was on the verge of an anxiety attack for the whole week. And not so fond memories of that weeks experiences are once again bringing back the same anxiety as I get closer to my own finals week in February.

One of the biggest problems I had the first time around was forgetting to verbalize everything. I was so busy concentrating on making sure I remembered to do everything correctly and not screw up, that the pathway from my brain to my mouth stopped working, lol. My biggest fear is that it will happen all over again.

Remaining calm during testing is key, and unfortunately for a lot of people, that is the hardest thing to do.

One word of advice, never let your certification lapse. Even if you don't plan on using it for a while, keep up with your CEH's. Otherwise you may just find yourself back in EMT school 20 years later trying to remember how to be a student once again.

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Posted · Report post

Verbalizing is always a tough one to remember, especially with students that get test anxiety. It happens to me.

I find myself in a very unusual position now as a prehospital EMS Educator, and also as an EMT student once again. It has been over 20 years since I was an EMT student for the first time, and all of those nerves and jitters are back again.

I remember the first time during the finals testing week, I was on the verge of an anxiety attack for the whole week. And not so fond memories of that weeks experiences are once again bringing back the same anxiety as I get closer to my own finals week in February.

One of the biggest problems I had the first time around was forgetting to verbalize everything. I was so busy concentrating on making sure I remembered to do everything correctly and not screw up, that the pathway from my brain to my mouth stopped working, lol. My biggest fear is that it will happen all over again.

Remaining calm during testing is key, and unfortunately for a lot of people, that is the hardest thing to do.

One word of advice, never let your certification lapse. Even if you don't plan on using it for a while, keep up with your CEH's. Otherwise you may just find yourself back in EMT school 20 years later trying to remember how to be a student once again.

Verbalizing can be difficult. We are used to it because even in the field we verbalize our CPR. Our AED's record so when the Medics arrive they will find us talking to the AED as if it were a doctor. Looks funny but the CPR team will listen to the recordings. Since we re-certify quarterly it becomes second nature and it carries over.

Our instructors told us we need to either see you do it or hear that you did it.

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Are you using this "box" Method because that is what will be tested, or because you want to try it? I would just keep it as simple and uncomplicated as possible. If you have access to your skills testing sheets go through them over and over, and then have someone read it off to you while you are doing your practice. No field tricks needed or wanted here, just follow whats in the book because that is the standard you will be tested against.

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I cannot help you on the box method. I don't know what that is. I can only assume that it is securing the patient to the board with webbing. We use spider straps to secure the patient to the board.

As far as testing is concerned, it has helped me to learn the skill sheets in a way that I can recite them verbally. This will help you remember to verbalize as you are moving through the testing process.

Relax and enjoy.

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Posted · Report post

what exactly is the final about ? It's not just a paper test ?

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Nope, you also have to be tested on scenarios. Usually one medical and one trauma.

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No, you have to show them you know what you are doing.

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