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Ambulance with back door cot lift?

Do you feel that a cot lift would be helpful?  

39 members have voted

  1. 1.

    • 1. Yes
      29
    • 2. No
      10


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Found a pic of something like what I'm talking about on

http://www.rsg.co.uk/taillifts/standardtail.asp

Web Page Name

Special Application

Modular Ambulance Door Lift

For more details on this product please visit;

http://www.modularambulance.co.uk/doorlift.htm

web]http://www.rsg.co.uk/taillifts/standardtail.asp[/web]

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This type of 'tail lift' is quite common in the UK, and does reduce the incidence of back injury.

Personally I don't like to use the trolley bed as a means of exrication from the scene unless clearly appropriate. However, once the pt is on the trolley bed, it is an excellent bit of kit for loading/un-loading them onto the vehicle.

I have found a big thing to remember when off loading is that the person inside the vehicle pushes, and the person outside the vehicle guides. And the same in reverse when loading. Otherwise there can be torsion pressures applied which kind of defeat the object of the exercise.

At the end of the day, using it regularly, it is a usefull piece of kit...Hope this helps.

Stretchermonkey.

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This type of 'tail lift' is quite common in the UK, and does reduce the incidence of back injury.

Personally I don't like to use the trolley bed as a means of exrication from the scene unless clearly appropriate. However, once the pt is on the trolley bed, it is an excellent bit of kit for loading/un-loading them onto the vehicle.

I have found a big thing to remember when off loading is that the person inside the vehicle pushes, and the person outside the vehicle guides. And the same in reverse when loading. Otherwise there can be torsion pressures applied which kind of defeat the object of the exercise.

At the end of the day, using it regularly, it is a usefull piece of kit...Hope this helps.

Stretchermonkey.

Thanks for the input :hello1: , Iknow it looked like a good idea but wanted to hear from those that use it. Now to see if any company's in the USA put them on their ambulances.

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We have a new bariatric ambulance on order, for delivery before summer. It will have one of the above lift systems. Sorry, I don't know which one.

It will be replacing a 1995 Ford F450 with a winch, ramp, and Powerflex litter.

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Thanks for responses so now which companys in USA make an ambulance with this option? Thanks

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The next town over has their ambulance equipped with one... GREAT IDEA, on paper...

1st, you either kill your back dragging the patient/cot at ground-level to the bus OR you have to lift the patient/cot and lower it to a position where it will lock into the bus...

2nd, once at the hospital you are again either lifting patient/cot once you have off-loaded them (to bring them into the hospital) or you're stuck dragging again...

3rd, once next to the ER bed, if you didn't lift it before you have to do it now... the ER bed doesn't go all the way to the floor

By my count... that's more lifts from a lower height than just doing it the "old-fashioned" way with either an X-frame or H-frame cot... Although, for an isolette, these devices are GREAT and work wonderfully... They're just SSSSLLLLOOOOWWWW...

Granted, my ever-aging back LOVES the idea of a lift but, one that actually REDUCES the amount of lifting would be really nice...

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The next town over has their ambulance equipped with one... GREAT IDEA, on paper...

1st, you either kill your back dragging the patient/cot at ground-level to the bus OR you have to lift the patient/cot and lower it to a position where it will lock into the bus...

2nd, once at the hospital you are again either lifting patient/cot once you have off-loaded them (to bring them into the hospital) or you're stuck dragging again...

3rd, once next to the ER bed, if you didn't lift it before you have to do it now... the ER bed doesn't go all the way to the floor

By my count... that's more lifts from a lower height than just doing it the "old-fashioned" way with either an X-frame or H-frame cot... Although, for an isolette, these devices are GREAT and work wonderfully... They're just SSSSLLLLOOOOWWWW...

Granted, my ever-aging back LOVES the idea of a lift but, one that actually REDUCES the amount of lifting would be really nice...

I have worked with the Stryker bariatric stretcher and a lift before.

On your first point, I can tell you there are handles that you can use that attach to the ends of the stretcher so you can push/pull the stretcher without bending over.

When off loading, one doesn't have to lower the stretcher to the ground. We lowered our ramp approx. 6in from the ambulance, then pulled the stretcher off just as if you were unloading from the ambulance. It seemed to be the preferred method as opposed to lifting it from the ground. This also works well when you are transferring the pt. to the ED bed as it is already in the air.

Cheers, :lol:

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