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So long as you get the information that you need to make a good decision when it comes to management of a problem, the alphabet soup you use to get there is really immaterial.

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Has anyone ever heard the Acronym P.A.S.T.M.E.D.S.? And if so have you ever used it? Is is better or worse than O.P.Q.R.S.T.?
They teach it at Foothill College for breathing difficulty calls. He told us one day we're going to be on the job, get our first call, walk in with our clean new uniform, with it's nice military press and shiny boots, going yeah, 'I'm an EMT', walk in the door and see a horrible SOB patient, yelling at you to help him, and a crazy family, and your just going to stand there frozen thinking 'aaaaah'. :lol: He said when that happens, just remember PASTMEDS, PASTMEDS, PASTMEDS.

We also learned OPQRST. We didn't really do BCAPBTLS, though, but it was in the book.

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He told us one day we're going to be on the job, get our first call, walk in with our clean new uniform, with it's nice military press and shiny boots, going yeah, 'I'm an EMT', walk in the door and see a horrible SOB patient, yelling at you to help him, and a crazy family, and your just going to stand there frozen thinking 'aaaaah'. :lol: He said when that happens, just remember PASTMEDS, PASTMEDS, PASTMEDS.

Unless you have a paramedic with you, forget all that crap. Put oxygen on him and get on the road. There is nothing you can do for him sitting around in his living room and asking pointless questions.

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Unless you have a paramedic with you, forget all that crap. Put oxygen on him and get on the road. There is nothing you can do for him sitting around in his living room and asking pointless questions.

Isn't it pretty important to get a history from the family so you have some background information when you get into the ER? Not at the cost of treating the patient, but while you're loading and going at least?
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Not particularly. The ER is going to ask it all over again anyhow. And there is nothing you can do with that information even if you do get it. While it should be elicited enroute simply as a matter of routine, it should not keep you on the scene for an extra minute.

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Provocation

Associated Symptoms

Sputum

Talking

Medications

Exacerbation/Alleviation

Duration

Severity of Distress

I think it's basic enough stuff. I think it can be used for more than just breathing difficulty, but it was presented in class for that purpose. Dust, I think having a heads up on this stuff can before transporting would be good, in case condition worsens en-route. In some cases aggressive bagging (if needed / becomes needed) is more important than in others, for example.

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Dust, I think having a heads up on this stuff can before transporting would be good, in case condition worsens en-route. In some cases aggressive bagging (if needed / becomes needed) is more important than in others, for example.

If you think there is a chance he is going down the tubes, then that is even more reason to get on the road. The more time you spend on scene asking pointless questions, the more likely it is that he will worsen enroute. The only reason to delay getting a patient to the hospital -- especially in a case of respiratory distress -- is if you have some type of therapeutic benefit to offer them there. You don't. What they need is at the hospital. Therefore, there is no excuse for pissing around on the scene just so you'll have something to write on your run report. Do it in the ambo.

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Provocation

Associated Symptoms

Sputum

Talking

Medications

Exacerbation/Alleviation

Duration

Severity of Distress

I think it's basic enough stuff. I think it can be used for more than just breathing difficulty, but it was presented in class for that purpose. Dust, I think having a heads up on this stuff can before transporting would be good, in case condition worsens en-route. In some cases aggressive bagging (if needed / becomes needed) is more important than in others, for example.

Actually this is what I was taught

P. Progression

A.Associated Chest Pain

S.Speutum production

T.Tolerence

M.Medications

E.Excercise

D.Diagnosis

S.Sounds

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