Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account
Current Chat Room Users
0 users are in Main Room:



Did you know it is free to become a member?  Just click "Create Account" on the top right of this page.


Photo

NREMT-P Psychomotor, Cognitive


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 RSI

RSI
  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New England
  • Occupation:Paramedic
Reputation: 7
Neutral



Posted 25 September 2012 - 05:31 PM

Hello, I took the psychomotor exam ~1 week ago and the cognitive exam this AM. I was definitely nervous for the psychomotor and thought I'd offer a few tips.

The skills stations are pretty straightforward and the proctors may ask a question or two about the process. Be prepared for these. The questions aren't meant to trick you, but the proctor may test your knowledge a little bit for unacknowledged brownie points. These questions aren't found in a little obscure subtext box in your book, but rather concepts that should have been covered during class. These brownie points may overlook small infractions in your skill demonstration, but don't bet the farm on it. Memorizing critical fails is essential because at the end, they may give you the option to take or add anything from your performance. If you have the list in your head, you can add something you forgot, like pre-oxygenating the patient. If you forgot, it's better to own up at the end and correct it rather than hope to sneak it by the proctor's attention. They do notice.

Oral stations: I was sweating bullets. At a bare minimum, know your common medical/trauma emergencies and their pathophysiology process and specific treatments. Protocols may help you, but remember: you can give the correct treatment for the wrong reasons. This is critical thinking so take your time, breathe, analyze the situation. Get as much diagnostic information as possible before enacting any interventions (the exception being oxygen, positioning, BLS). Reciting the bolus dose of Adenosine is not nearly as helpful as explaining the why and what. Also, don't "zone in" on the biggest, most "life-saving" intervention. At the end of the practical testing, I was walking out with a fellow who I had recently met and he was detailing the same scenario I had. His choice of intervention made me internally wince and his rationale was "I'm going to make sure this guy is going to f*'ing live!"

I've heard horror stories of NREMT practicals being strict and regimented with proctors being stoic and unnerving. I can't vouch for that, but if fellow students/instructors mention this, it's probably more true than not.

If there's a run down of equipment the night before the exam, sign up if your finances can afford it. The instructor will give you key tips that will help you pass. If you can't afford it, remember when you show up at a station and are faced with an unfamiliar piece of equipment, ask the proctor to show you how it works and transfer your knowledge of what you're familiar to this...new thing.

Get sleep. You'll be better off in the AM. But study a little bit beforehand. =)

And don't ever forget, 100% OXYGEN (my bane during lab).

I took the CBT this AM. The best resources (aside from studying the entire book) is the FISDAP online study tools and practice tests that you find online. Don't think taking the tests with a passing grade means you'll do well. Use these practice tests to discover your biggest weakness and improve them. Rinse, repeat. I personally used an NREMT-clone testing app for the iPhone. It proved very helpful. Do what works for you. As to my personal performance, my test shut off after 80 questions in about 50 minutes. As to how I feel about it? It's 13:30 and I'm on my second rum and coke, about to strip down to boxers and start vacuuming. I celebrate weird, I know. The perils and enjoyment of unemployment!

To quote a fellow classmate who texted me hours before my practical, "You know this shit. You've done it several times. Relax. And do it."

Good luck!
  • 2

#2 scratrat

scratrat
  • Members
  • 411 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Landisville, New Jersey
  • Occupation:Paramedic/Correctional Officer
Reputation: 14
Neutral

Posted 26 September 2012 - 04:43 PM

lol....that's HILARIOUS! Enjoy one for me!

I did the CBT and it also shut down in low 80's and I passed. So I think you're good.
How long did it take for them to post the psychomotor skills part on the website?? I'm DYING waiting for them post even though I was already told I passed.

In the oral station, I had a girl, 7 years old struck by a car. BAD shape, head injury, needs intubation, blah blah. I had a helicopter with a 2 minute ETA from the get go. No radials, weak carotids. I played for real and had this chick loaded in the bird within minutes! The proctor was actually the medical director from the hospital I was testing at. He tells me to good ahead with report and I did. (Remember, I already have 12 years as a paramedic and was just getting my national back). He then asks about vitals. I was like CRAP!!! Then I matter-of-factly told him I didn't have time for that given the circumstances and quick transfer to the bird. I thought I failed!! He still passed me!
  • 0

#3 RSI

RSI
  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New England
  • Occupation:Paramedic
Reputation: 7
Neutral

Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:35 PM

Hello, Scrat!

The unofficial results of the psychomotor exam was emailed to me later that evening. It was a service the proctoring facility did for test takers. Official results were posted ~3 business days later. Hold tough, the wait is almost as agonizing as testing! Also, I've been really lucky; I received my CBT results and passed.

It seems to me that a portion of our verbal stations has to do with inflection and confidence in our voice. Hemming and hawing is going to cause the proctor to focus more intently on your words/"actions". I especially noticed this during my final, oral exam with instructors. I'm sure when the medical director tested you, you exuded this confidence! Great job on the scenario!

I don't want to delve too much into my scenario, but in regards to my story of the fellow I had met: He paced a moderate-severe hypothermic patient (with related bradycardia, GCS 14).
  • 0

#4 scratrat

scratrat
  • Members
  • 411 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Landisville, New Jersey
  • Occupation:Paramedic/Correctional Officer
Reputation: 14
Neutral

Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:15 PM

Well, now you scared me a little more...I got the CBT results the next day. The psychomotor still hasn't posted. It's going to be 12 months on October 11 for the CBT and so I was getting nervous that I may have to do it all over again......ugh.....

The NREMT website says 3 weeks, so I don't know that I can even call....
  • 0

#5 fakingpatience

fakingpatience
  • Members
  • 205 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Occupation:Paramedic
Reputation: 12
Neutral

Posted 08 October 2012 - 02:57 PM

It took me ~2 weeks to get my psychomotor test results posted online. CBT I got 2 (nerve-wracking) days after taking the test
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users