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NYCntg

Make my duty belt LIGHTER! (Please)

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Im going to disagree with the crowd and consensus on this one.

I wear this belt. Yes I am a whacker, but a whacker with a well educated head on his neck.

You are in an urban enviroment, as I am. When poking around in the ghetto, I wear...

-Flashlight (i refuse to use those giant 20 lb maglights)

-Glovecase (i dont always wear gloves, because you dont always need them)

-bandage shears (i hate hunting for shears)

-Multi-tool

-leather gloves (hand protection for extrication / combative drunken goobers / your local Mc-Dopey)

Cell Phone

Radio

Pager.

Only a few pounds, and everything you need.

I have a small holster with shears (same reason as PRPG),O2 wrench and 2 pens. I also have a radio that I keep it in the leather holder with a shoulder sling ( don't know the technical name, but who cares) :D

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Hey guys, KNOCK OFF ATTACKING THE NEW PEOPLE!

It's not just the 'new people' that are getting offended by these types of comments. It's any EMT-B, Firefighter or combination of the two (like myself).

It's no secret that I've worked EMS in metro Detroit (I'm rather proud of that fact). I too started carrying a 'batbelt' (it makes it easy to ditch all the equipment I've found I needed in day to day environment).

I've actually used a 'multi-tool' to remove a headboard at a ECF, to help a MEDIC drop an ETT, because he couldnt get a good line of sight otherwise.

Glove pouches for carrying more than one pair work well at multiple injury calls (again, talking about Detroit, go figure).

And yes, I've even had call to use a window punch on an extrication call. Just because you work in an area that doesn't require that you carry more than your pen and a penlight, it's not cool to go around bashing those of us that actually have to do something!

Obviously if you feel the need to bash those that haven't advanced to your 'level' (for what ever reason), then you've forgotten that you started at the bottom of the 'food chain' as well.

As for bashing those that do a job that you either can't do or don't understand, only shows how small minded you truely are!

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It's not just the 'new people' that are getting offended by these types of comments. It's any EMT-B, Firefighter or combination of the two (like myself).

It's no secret that I've worked EMS in metro Detroit (I'm rather proud of that fact). I too started carrying a 'batbelt' (it makes it easy to ditch all the equipment I've found I needed in day to day environment).

I've actually used a 'multi-tool' to remove a headboard at a ECF, to help a MEDIC drop an ETT, because he couldnt get a good line of sight otherwise.

Glove pouches for carrying more than one pair work well at multiple injury calls (again, talking about Detroit, go figure).

And yes, I've even had call to use a window punch on an extrication call. Just because you work in an area that doesn't require that you carry more than your pen and a penlight, it's not cool to go around bashing those of us that actually have to do something!

Obviously if you feel the need to bash those that haven't advanced to your 'level' (for what ever reason), then you've forgotten that you started at the bottom of the 'food chain' as well.

As for bashing those that do a job that you either can't do or don't understand, only shows how small minded you truely are!

I swore I was going to stay out of this ridiculous thread as I could run with it all day long, but I have to ask, why on earth a dirty multitool is anywhere near a sterile packed item that is going into someone's trachea??????WTF, over..........

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I swore I was going to stay out of this ridiculous thread as I could run with it all day long, but I have to ask, why on earth a dirty multitool is anywhere near a sterile packed item that is going into someone's trachea??????WTF, over..........

I think that the multi-tool was used to remove the headboard of the bed so that the medic could stand/sit/kneel/whatever there, not in the actual procedure of intubation...that would be kinda gross. :D

To the OP...if you are required to carry all that stuff, the only thing that I can suggest is to also use your pockets for the smaller stuff. And are both you and your partner required to carry all that stuff? (If so, well, I knew that there were some whack protocols out there, but that one just takes the cake.)

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I swore I was going to stay out of this ridiculous thread as I could run with it all day long, but I have to ask, why on earth a dirty multitool is anywhere near a sterile packed item that is going into someone's trachea??????WTF, over..........

Ok, let's go back and read this as it was written. I used the multi-tool to remove the headboard of the bed that the patient was laying in. Nowhere was it stated that the multi-tool was used in the insertion of the ETT.

The medic that benefitted from my having a 'tool' to deal with the situation followed all proper protocols.

I just love having to spoon feed information to those that just can't seem to follow along!

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Ok, I’ve been watching this conversation with some amusement and some disappointment, first, there are some here that really need to grow up, if you have an opinion, you should have every right to express it without fear of being bashed, insulted, or belittled.

As a medic I know there is more than one way to get the job done (and even remain within “The Standard of Care”), as a paid EMS professional I know there are a number other professionals that have many years more experience than I do, and a number that have much less.

There is an old saying that states, a lower number on your card does not mean a smarter provider.

But this conversation is interesting, because it opens a window on how different we all are, yet we do the same thing. Which is thinking on our feet, make the best of what we have, and improvising the rest.

What seems to be the theme are those (Like myself) that work in a (mostly vertical) urban environment wear a duty belt, and those that can readily access their bus leave it there.

I can empathize with the people that must bring their equipment with them on every run, for I too have to do the same and have been working to lower the weight I carry on a constant basis.

This thread has been great in many ways because it shows how we as a profession address the same problem in different ways.

So what do I carry, some may want to know, (I’m sure a bunch reading this couldn’t care less):

First let me say in the NY system of which I also work, you MUST carry with you some basics as per NY state EMS DOH guidelines:

A Stethoscope, Blood pressure cuff, Penlight, Oxygen tank wrench, Shears, Radio, Watch with a second hand.

Now what do I carry?

Along with the above (except BP cuff which is in the Jump bag and supplied by my corp), On my belt goes: my phone, Hazmat pager, key ring holder and keys, Benchmade Rescue Hook which has a nice flat belt holder and weighs nothing (I just don’t like how quick it gets dull), and a nylon radio holder with attached side pocket in which I keep a mini drug reference, protocol quick reference, shears, plastic umbilical clamp (good for holding an IV bag on a carry down), Streamlight duel LED/REG flashlight ($25 on Amazon), shove knife (the only tool for opening simple doors real easy), black sharpie marker, a great if I do say so myself, O2 Wrench {yes one of mine!} (All this fits nicely in the radio holder), a glove pouch, utility gloves in back pocket, a spider co spiderwrench multi tool which clips to the inside of my front pocket, a pen in my shirt pocket. My uniform paints are not BDU’s so they don’t have the thigh pockets. I find this covers all my needs and I even switched to lithium batteries (thanks for the tip) to lighten up a little more.

Btw, I have yet to see an o2 wrench last in the bag, they always seem to grow legs and escape…

Also, I leave my cert cards (which we must also carry) with my wallet in my tour bag locked in the bus.

I can’t think of how to get this any lighter, without leaving something necessary out, if I do I’ll let you know.

Finally, in an environment in which, when undertaking patient care, easy and quick access to the bus is NOT an option, having SOP’s requiring you to bring all this stuff to every job should not have to be SOC, it should be common sense, but that’s another thread entirely…

Hope this helped,

jk

PS I for one, am interested in what people carry to their assignments, please feel free to post your list.

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Meet Belts 8) :D

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NYCntg,

I can't imagine the frustration at having to carry so much stuff and on top of it having it be madatory to do so. Hopefully you will discover a solution or put together a mix of ideas to achieve your optimal goal.

I don't have any advice although I know that is what you are searching for. I have worked for the 40 minute transport thumper rural vollie (gasp!) services and I have worked for private and hospital based services. Somehow I have managed to travel light and tend to use my cargo pockets for "stuff". I don't really hang alot of things off my belt as I feel awkward while working. I keep one pocket just for gloves, another for a small flashlight and cell phone and credit card and incidentals and the little slim pockets hold my pens and penlight and trauma sheers.

BTW, thank you for the many years you have spent dedicated to EMS.

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Attach the regulator key to the car keys. Phone in shirt pocket. Radio on hip. Sheers in boot. Gloves in each of your back pockets.

Get a Surefire miniflashlight, they usually provide ample light. It can go in your pants pocket.

Give the stairchair to you partner. We only take these when we see there will be stairs for sure, but I guess in NY that might be every call. In fact you partner can carry the flashlight and radio and keys for you. Spread it out.

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Headboard???? WTF over....

I dont think I have ever tubed someone in a bed, they get dragged to the floor, another room where there is light/room, or outside to the ambo. The time it takes to remove a headboard, I easily could of had them in the floor and tubed.

Oh well...I wouldnt be me if I didnt pick on LS....

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