Jump to content

Behold, my badass combat pack!


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 53
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Span(s) = cheaper + no glass bottles + longer shelf life + less chances of reactions + 52 degrees C = a no brainer.

You must be from Ontario?...jusy plain silly mate, hypernatremia is a very real concern, frankly I can see no rational for hypertonic saline in trauma, correct me if I am missing the point here, but the newer Volume expanders are the way to go.

AGREED!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice kit. Did they issue or did you have to go get it on your own?

I brought it with me with just my basic tools in it (otoscope, opthalmoscope, stethoscope, pulse ox, scissors, suture set, laryngoscope, and a few bandages), and stocked it out with consumables when I arrived. I figured I'd be the odd man out with the LBT bag, since most of the Army uses the STOMP. Interestingly, the issue item in this area is the LBT, which are identical to mine. Although, the Marines are utilising another similar bag that is OD and covered in MOLLE webbing and, I think, only has one compartment. I have yet to dig into one. You still also see some of the basic woodland camo MOLLE bags with all the big mesh flaps that fold out. Pretty much, when you get here, you dump out all your old standard battle dressings and replace them with the Izzys, CAT's, etc... For both civilian and military, most guys will recommend that you bring your own bag and basic tools. You never know what you will or will not be able to get when you get here. Leave all the consumables at home, but if you want to be sure you have the bag you like and the blades you use, bring your own.

As for the haemostatics, what is carried varies from AO to AO. Being on a Joint Service base, I am lucky to have access to everything. The only one I have used so far is the HemCon dressings, which I absolutely love! They plug a hole like a tampon and do a very good job of stopping bleeding without the mess or side effects of QuickClot. I hear conflicting anecdotes about QuickClot and TraumaDex, but if used properly under ideal conditions, it seems to help. Problem is, proper use and ideal conditions are elusive in this environment, accounting for many failures. And, of course, they really have no place in civilian EMS.

We don't have the EZ-IOs here. Or, if we do, I am unaware of it. We should! Now I am going to have to go scrounging and see if I can find any. As for Quick Trake, I haven't used it and probably won't. I can do a scalpel/Shiley trach faster and more efficiently. But I'll still keep the kit in the bag just in case.

Hespan is what we currently carry. I get no choice in the matter, and actually haven't really kept up with the debate. Whatever I can get, I use. The only other fluid we carry is NS, just for simplicity. The cool thing we have is something that is new to me, adjustable drip sets that you can change from 10 to 15 to 60 gtts/min. I love those!

There are plenty of STOMP IIs around here. We even have one in our response vehicle. I prefer it to the more expensive LBT bag. The STOMPs are a tad bit roomier because of the way they are sewn. They expand better. The handles and straps are more ergonomic. It wears more comfortably. And frankly, they are just better constructed. The layout is identical between the two bags though.

I don't have any pouches set up on my vest as of yet. I have been trying to find pouches that suit my needs. So far, all I can find are those that have a bunch of useless little loops and pockets in them for wanker supplies. I need some that are just wide open for stuffing 3 or 4 Izzys into, like the Navy Corpsmen carry. The vests are MOLLE webbed, so I can hang crap anywhere on it. Once I find some good pouches, I'll post a pic of the vest.

And yes, I do carry bandaids! That little OD green pouch hanging off the side of the bag is nothing but bandaids, wipes, bacitracin, and NuSkin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree with you Dust. I'm sticking with my STOMP. I have mine setup almost exactly like your. You've visited my unit so hyou know how we are structured. I have my guys pack to treat at least 15 soldiers Trauma and maybe 30-40 minor stuff so yeah we need alot of stuff. I just orderd 35 STGOMPs for Border Security, I can always order a half dozen more with the goodies that we like. I'll see what I can pull off.

Take care, stay in the bunker when it is noisy out and Allah will keep you safe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have any pouches set up on my vest as of yet. I have been trying to find pouches that suit my needs. So far, all I can find are those that have a bunch of useless little loops and pockets in them for wanker supplies. I need some that are just wide open for stuffing 3 or 4 Izzys into, like the Navy Corpsmen carry. The vests are MOLLE webbed, so I can hang crap anywhere on it. Once I find some good pouches, I'll post a pic of the vest.

Dust, have you checked Blakhawk for pouches? They have some specific for medical, but a lot of others they could be used for that purpose. Also, Spec-Ops Brand has some stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I need a comfortable back-pack that's good for easy access to my medical supplies (BLS). Do you guys think the STOMP II is worth the money for BLS? I don't have any medications, and much fewer little items to fit into neat rows of elastic. On the other hand, I don't like using a regular, cavernous back-pack, because it's hard to see everything. Also, I need the back pack to have a waist belt, and possibly a chest buckle, as I ride S&R on a dirt bike. What do you guys think? Is the STOMP II best for me, or would a Stat-Pack be better?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm... well, I can highly recommend the STOMP bag, but I am not sure it would be convenient for general trauma use in the civilian world. You have to undo 6 buckles and two zippers just to get at the first compartment, which is a hassle. You have to lay it down and unfold it to get to the contents. And for strict BLS use, it really holds a lot more than you probably would need for anything less than mass casualty. I mean sure, you cold pack some big bottles of irrigation and burn dressings and splints in there and fill it up, and that wouldn't be unreasonable. But again, it would probably be more bag than you want to carry on your back while riding.

I don't know anything a bout the Stat-Packs, but they have a good reputation. I would definitely get something smaller than a STOMP. The Blackhawk "Special Operations Medical Pack is a good choice. It's what the Navy corpsmen carry here instead of the Stomp. It's not made for jumping, so it doesn't have all the fasteners, and it's a tad bit smaller. Definitely more practical for most uses.

As for the tiny instrument loops in the front compartment of the STOMP, I also find them useless. I solved that problem in fifteen minutes with a scalpel. Just carefully cut the stitching out of the little loops and they become big loops. Look carefully at the photo and you can see that where the tiny loops were, I now carry the TraumaDex pouches. They would also hold Kling, triangulars, Surgipads, or whatever. Just be careful to not cut out the stitching that goes through to the compartment dividers below.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I need a comfortable back-pack that's good for easy access to my medical supplies (BLS). Do you guys think the STOMP II is worth the money for BLS? I don't have any medications, and much fewer little items to fit into neat rows of elastic. On the other hand, I don't like using a regular, cavernous back-pack, because it's hard to see everything. Also, I need the back pack to have a waist belt, and possibly a chest buckle, as I ride S&R on a dirt bike. What do you guys think? Is the STOMP II best for me, or would a Stat-Pack be better?

Lots of ways to skin this cat... dude; these are called the R-200 or R-400 used combination with the SKED in SAR in Alberta, and for Woodland FireFighters response. As for riding with packs on your back on dirt bikes it can make one quite top heavy, and prone to crashes yourself.

Just a word, load the heavy gear in the bottom (on a bike) if your (walking gear in) keep the weight higher on your back.

http://www.gutz.com/ems/products/catalogue...205&mode=sp

or

http://www.gutz.com/ems/products/catalogue...192&mode=sp

cheers

squint the grunt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...