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Why is it that EMS seems to be one of the few professions where we will eat our young? What are your thoughts, and have you experienced this in your professional life as an EMS employee?

peace

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Ever make grand rounds with surgeons?....... Not, only do they eat their young, but regurgitate them and spit them back out, to chew some more. We are way too easy on new ones... that is part of the problem, we have started cuddling, and watering things down from the beginning, from basic on..up the line. Ask any of the old-timers.. how easy they had it. No, don't be mean but aggressive and demanding and have great expectations of the new EMT's. New EMT's be prepared.. really prepared, study, have the answer before being asked.. etc.

Medicine is tough.. short and simple 90% of what we do, is really irregardless, and really are not using our education, however; the remainder 10% is what really get paid for. This is when the poop hits the fan, and you have to really know what you are doing.. no, second guesses, or chances and yes really what you do or don't do can make the difference.

Just like in ACLS, (that has been so politically corrected) we have personnel now that are not prepared when it gets rough... its stressful, and you have to have excellent critical thinking skills.... and that is developed with time, clinical exposure of stressful events, and learning how to perform under such pressure and demands.

Be safe,

R.r 911

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Why is it that EMS seems to be one of the few professions where we will eat our young?

Because of a combination of the "cool" factor and the abysmally low entry standards, a huge percentage of the newcomers this so-called "profession" draws are complete losers. The professionals try hard to run off the losers who are screwing up the profession. And the existing losers try hard to run off the sharp people because they are a threat to their status quo. Consequently, everybody is out to get everybody.

That's why.

The answer? Same as the answer to each and every other question facing EMS. Education. Period.

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I've been treated pretty rough before, but the simple awnser is this. As long as you are good at what you do, and know what your doing and WHY you are doing it, nobody will give you a rough time. I'm 20, I've been flat out told I'm too young, I don't know jack, but everyone I've ever worked with has come to respect me and look over me. To me, it's a matter of respect. Of course they aren't going to respect me, respect is earned. Proffesional respect is different, that is a REQUIRED to work together, and should be there at all times.

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Being rough on new people is a valid attempt to weed out the weak and uneducated idiots coming out of the schools now (and in the past). Its not that we hate you, but like RegularEMT said we want you to prove yourself. If you can't handle your co-workers giving you grief you'll never make it out on the streets.

Peace,

Marty

:thumbleft:

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Medicine is tough.. short and simple 90% of what we do, is really irregardless, and really are not using our education, however; the remainder 10% is what really get paid for.

Rid.... Irregardless???? -10 :D Please tell me you don't say O2 stat as well... :D

Back to the thread... Take one cranky, slightly burnt out EMS person.... add one 18 y/o EMT with nuttin' for experience or education with an EGO to boot... and you get a thorough beat down, including eating of the young.

Neither side is right. It's the unfortunate combination of the two that is the problem. *Advice for youngsters* You are more likely to get the shaft end in an argument with a tenured guy... Show up, keep your mouth shut (except to ask questions (good ones)), your ears open, and the notepad in your brain ready to jot down information. If you do that, then chances are the razzing you receive will eventually turn into admiration and respect. Then soon YOU will be in the position to sprinkle salt and pepper on your young before dinner-time. :lol:

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Rid, that's a good point. I agree that we need to test the newcomers and make sure they know their stuff, after all, they're gonna be looking after us in a few years when we have our first MI :D However, I think one of the problems is people don't know where to draw the line and how to do this professionally.

Dust, I really hope your comments are more USA geared. You seem to be familiar with the Canadian EMS standards and education, so I honestly don't see this being a problem up here. I will admit though, I am partial to the Alberta way of education. Monkey skills first and get those out of the way as an EMR, then you begin learning in EMT-A and EMT-P.

Scaramedic, good point ... I suppose it builds comradery, but I do feel many people take it too far.

peace

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Camaraderie? In a few places I do/ have worked, people are barely there long enough to learn their names before they're out the door to another service.

Call me sick, but I appreciated the 'bashing' of being new. Not only did I get people to acknowledge my existence, but I could either learn, or show what I do know, and don't know.

Now, I'm obviously not a crispy, well seasoned Paramedic, but I'm afraid to ask questions of a lot of the people I work with. Not only am I afraid of the answers I may get, but people turn around so quick and just begin the typical "He's a ^&%%$%&", etc. etc.

It's tough working with brand new basics who know everything...

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Is that how you spell it? haha ... Interesting though the spell check didn't pick it up ...

Anyways, if I can offer a slap on the wrist I will right now ... NEVER be afraid to ask questions, as that is what truly shows immaturity, both on your part and those you're asking if they can't give you an answer without a few stripes.

I've ALWAYS encouraged questions, and although I joke around a lot at work, if someone can muster the guts to pull me aside and ask something (and in the process admit that they don't know something), I'll give them all the time in the world and find a way to relate the information so they can understand, comprehend and retain it.

peace

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It's tough working with brand new basics who know everything...

Hey, I'm not new... and I know MOST everything. :D

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