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PRPGfirerescuetech

Difficulties with Paramedics as EMT's

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Yes Rid, we learned all those things in Basic class Spiking a bag, IV setup et al. A portion of the class called ALS assist. I like the fact I can do things to help my medic partner. If I can free her to perform more advanced procedures like starting IV's or placing a ET tube, then It's a good thing. Or am I wrong here?

Your not wrong, your right on! As an EMT your play a very important role in assisting your paramedic partner on the truck, just as you stated. Theres tons of things you can do on the truck to help out your partner. When you get done with school, you will see just how much your partner appreciates your efforts as an EMT. A good EMT partner is priceless...

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Your not wrong, your right on! As an EMT your play a very important role in assisting your paramedic partner on the truck, just as you stated. Theres tons of things you can do on the truck to help out your partner. When you get done with school, you will see just how much your partner appreciates your efforts as an EMT. A good EMT partner is priceless...

That's what everyone has been saying, I'm glad I picked the choice of careers I did, but man, I fear paramedics after reading this board sometimes. :lol:

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Your not wrong, your right on! As an EMT your play a very important role in assisting your paramedic partner on the truck, just as you stated. Theres tons of things you can do on the truck to help out your partner. When you get done with school, you will see just how much your partner appreciates your efforts as an EMT. A good EMT partner is priceless...

Not impressed. The typical EMT devotes all his time to that sort of crap -- spiking bags, tearing tape, and running strips -- in the mistaken belief that it is helping him (cuz few of them are really interested in helping anybody but themselves), and lets his EMT book gather dust at home, never again opening it up to study MEDICINE and truly improve himself. Does it help me to do all those silly little monkey tasks for me? Sure. Thanks. But I will be MUCH more impressed with you if I see you actually studying on duty and taking college classes off duty rather than constantly hounding me about learning some other skill you don't have the education to use.

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Good start. I can relate to all of those. You know what that means?

It means that the medics with those issues have them even if their partner is a medic. EMT's shouldn't get all defensive about this situation, because usually their cert level has nothing to do with it. Those medics are lazy jerks no matter who their partner is. I've experienced the same issues with medics who had half my experience. Jerks are jerks.

100% correct. Jerks are jerks. But, these are issues EMT's are seeing with medics. The point of the post is working on that dichotomy regardless of situation.

As a side note, i work limited mic and bls 911 trucks. I have many of the same issues with medics too. So im on board with this. Just like many of the issues you outlined in the "medics issues with EMT's thread" ive had with medics. For instance, you dislike an EMT who argues with you about non emergent rides to the hospital with non emergent patients. I have medics who drive me BLS with L/S. You have issues with EMT's who argue about running strips on DOA's. I have issues with Medics who dont run them, in accordance to the protocols of one of the counties I operate in.

There are jerks everywhere, your right. One of the major issues in this field. But, the thread was designed to highlight issues. As well as solutions. Your a smart fella, lets try to find ways to actually make this dicohtomy better. You want a partner, and we all want to make this dichotomy work, but it takes efforts from both the medic and EMT to make this happen.

Now, back on topic.

This is the easiest solution to a good working dichotomy between a Medic and EMT.

1.) Talk. ALOT. Learn what your EMT knows. Find out what he doesnt know. Fill in his blanks. Never know, he/she might fill in yours.

2.)Outline specifically how you work. When it comes to style of operation, every medic is different. Make sure there are no questions on how you want your calls run.

3.) Run as many calls as you can together, and quickly. Squirrel them if you have to. More contacts together, the better the flow.

4.) Give them as much leash as you trust them with. Just dont underestimate them ahead of time. Be sure to hit steps 1-3 before the forth.

5.) Find out from your basic what they are looking for from you. Remember, in this 2 person dichotomy, you are not the most important. Lose your god complex, and you will gain a partner. Your EMT, god willing, will know his role. Let them do their job, continue to fill in their gaps, and your partner will grow to your mold. Give it time, be encouraging, and follow these last steps.

6.) Do NOT allow incompetence. All of you know what a basic can do. You all were one at one pointe. Show them how to be the best they can, to the standards you hold. If they have the basline skills they need and are already capable. Respect that. This goes back to losing the god complex.

More to come, but this is the big stuff.

Education comes in many forms, and this is a form. Medicine is based on education. Lets be proactive in that role. One way, is during this relationship outlined.

PRPG

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Good stuff! :thumbright:

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Not impressed. The typical EMT devotes all his time to that sort of crap -- spiking bags, tearing tape, and running strips -- in the mistaken belief that it is helping him (cuz few of them are really interested in helping anybody but themselves), and lets his EMT book gather dust at home, never again opening it up to study MEDICINE and truly improve himself. Does it help me to do all those silly little monkey tasks for me? Sure. Thanks. But I will be MUCH more impressed with you if I see you actually studying on duty and taking college classes off duty rather than constantly hounding me about learning some other skill you don't have the education to use.

I'm never impressed by anything you have to say, since the majority of it belongs in a nice big smelly pile of shit! Why not just make the attempt to be "open-minded" for just one day?

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Your not wrong, your right on! As an EMT your play a very important role in assisting your paramedic partner on the truck, just as you stated. Theres tons of things you can do on the truck to help out your partner. When you get done with school, you will see just how much your partner appreciates your efforts as an EMT. A good EMT partner is priceless... That's what everyone has been saying, I'm glad I picked the choice of careers I did, but man, I fear paramedics after reading this board sometimes. :lol:

You know, the other thing is that legally speaking, if an EMT screws up while working with a medic, the medic will hang for it. So, if I have to be a jerk and maybe hurt someone's feelings once in a while to prevent myself from ending up in front of a sleazy man in an overpriced Armani suit during a deposition, so be it. If the game is to rough for you, get off the field.

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That's what everyone has been saying, I'm glad I picked the choice of careers I did, but man, I fear paramedics after reading this board sometimes. :lol:

There's no reason to fear paramedics, I wouldn't even fear some of the dumbasses out here that call themselves paramedics. There's a lot of idiots in EMS, some of them are right here in this forum, don't let them or anyone else change your views of EMS...

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You know, the other thing is that legally speaking, if an EMT screws up while working with a medic, the medic will hang for it. So, if I have to be a jerk and maybe hurt someone's feelings once in a while to prevent myself from ending up in front of a sleazy man in an overpriced Armani suit during a deposition, so be it. If the game is to rough for you, get off the field.

Hit that nail on the head asysin. That is something I always watched out for, my ass.

Peace,

Marty

:thumbleft:

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1.) Paragod mentalities. Simply stated, the "i am god, and no one measures up to me"

I find it funny this comes from someone who described his occupation as "God". :lol:

But seriously, I agree with what you've posted here as well as with your follow up . Most of this bugs even other paramedics, too. So don't think it's just a EMT perception of medics.

-be safe.

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