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itku2er

Do EMTs have the right to correct a paramedic?

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I was just wondering how you all feel about this.....

As an EMT I do you have the right to Tell a Paramedic when they do something wrong or inadequate?

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Absolutely!!!

If it is on scene while tending to a pt and it may compromise patient care, do it ASAP, however do it in a non condescending, in your face you screwed up way. This is when it is only minor things. If it is harmful to the pts life, you better speak up loud and clear. For instance if you see a medic getting ready to push the wrong drug or the wrong dose, stop them and ask them why they are doing it. Just be sure you are able to support your actions with facts, so that you are not stopiing the medic everytime he goes to push a drug.

Now about your wording.."do I have the right to TELL them they did something wrong"...

You have the right to bring it to their attention and see why it varies from what you percieved to be correct. See what the person was thinking and why they did something a certain way before you TELL them they were wrong. All of this is acceptable, its all just a matter of how you present it that either makes the medic fly off the handle and belittle you, or humbles him and he thanks you, or you learn a new way of doing something.

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Very Good Ak !.. I even inform Doc's even sometimes : "Are you sure ?".. or did you see this ?... Even all of us sometimes will not see the whole picture or not hear something in the history. I don't know how many times I have Doc's, nurses etc.. thank me afterwords... the same I do for them as well. It is a team approach, yes the Medic is the Captain, but this does not mean they are the ruler. If they get upset, because you suggested or informed them something appropriately, they need an attitude adjustment.

I know I rather have my EMT tell me something than to make an error... in which, later I found out they knew about & allowed to me to make.. they would held just as responsible as I would for making the error.

Be safe,

R/r 911

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My rule of thumb is; you can tell me whatever you want to as long as you have the best interests of the patient at heart.

ie..If you see me about to push the wrong med, like AK said speak up loud and clear and quick. I will thank you for it.

however, if say you see me about to push the wrong med, watch me push the wrong med and then bring it up back at the station in front of everybody and their dog, be prepared for me to rip of your head and $hit down your neck.

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One t shirt says it all.......

"Paramedics save lives, EMTs save paramedics"

My partner and I ran on a diabetic who responded nicely to the D50... Then he became diaphoretic and lethargic.....I slapped the monitor on and he was at a rate of 30.....My partner gave me an atta girl and we transported patient as a cardiac alert.

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I frequently tell my supervisor, "Go to HE(LL), Bob".

As was already stated, it is in how you tell them.

Luckily, I don't have trouble with my partners and their treatment selections. We have all worked together for many years, and easily get on the same wavelength. But, there are many times both of us do not get the full story from the patient. Since we are a 2 person crew in a busy system, one of us might not get the whole story. So we talk, and relay information frequently. There have been times where my partner didn't hear the "near" syncopal episode, or the period of chest pain with radiation, or the fact that the patient is diabetic. How I relay that information to my partner helps them determine treatment. With many patients, you have to ask questions a few times, different ways, to get good info. We often get "the hospital has it all, why do you need it?"

If I happen to be on a BLS truck with another service, there are some medics I will tell what to do, and how to do it. Some are competent medics, with HORRIBLE inter-personal skills, who need a dose of humanization. Some are just not good medics, and you need to give them a clue.

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One t shirt says it all.......

"Paramedics save lives, EMTs save paramedics"

Unfornutaly, both statements are about as far from the truth as you can get.

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Absolutely!!!

If it is on scene while tending to a pt and it may compromise patient care, do it ASAP, however do it in a non condescending, in your face you screwed up way. This is when it is only minor things. If it is harmful to the pts life, you better speak up loud and clear. For instance if you see a medic getting ready to push the wrong drug or the wrong dose, stop them and ask them why they are doing it. Just be sure you are able to support your actions with facts, so that you are not stopiing the medic everytime he goes to push a drug.

Now about your wording.."do I have the right to TELL them they did something wrong"...

You have the right to bring it to their attention and see why it varies from what you percieved to be correct. See what the person was thinking and why they did something a certain way before you TELL them they were wrong. All of this is acceptable, its all just a matter of how you present it that either makes the medic fly off the handle and belittle you, or humbles him and he thanks you, or you learn a new way of doing something.

+1. The tone that someone uses to say something is citical. I don't mind someone calling someting to my attention, or discussing ideas. But I don't care that much for EMT's telling me what I need to do. This happened to me last week on a call, and unfortunately for the crew that was there they didn't know what they were talking about. This is the exception rather than the rule since most crews are competent. Use the proper tone and make suggestions.

Shane

NREMT-P

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It's always a sad day when the EMT is smarter than the medic...That being said sometimes as a basic you need to inject your medic with a dose of reality and get them to answer their "Clue Phone"...As was mentioned previously, just be as diplomatic as possible, and look out for your pt as best you can!!

out here,

ACE844

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