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Problems Getting to Phone  

5 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you have issues getting to your phone when you're working, especially in emergency situations?

    • Yes
      1
    • No
      4
  2. 2. If you said yes, would you invest money into a sturdy piece of equipmemt to solve the issue?

    • Yes
      1
    • No
      4


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Right now, we're working on designing and refining our first functional prototype. Once we get some ideas for improvements on that, we're gonna improve the desing, and send out 2.0 versions for testing from people who would want to test it. (No charge to you, but we are asking for feedback from the testers once they feel like they've used it enough to give good advice as to how we could make it better.) If either of you'd be interested in getting one, just message me. I'd definitely like to hear your feedback once you guys actually get a feel for the product.

we don't even know what your prototype is.  I'd would definately be interested in being a "betatester" but you really haven't given us a idea of what version 1.0 is.  

At least give us an idea of what version 1.0 is.  

Think of us as your seed money guys - you have one elevator trip from the lobby to the 110th floor, you have about 3 minutes to WOW us with your idea in order to get your money.  

Or consider us your Sharks on Sharktank

So WOW us.  

Edited by Ruffmeister Paramedic
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  • 4 years later...
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I've noticed that telephones can once in a while be tough to get from your pocket in regular situations, and that were given me thinking that it'd probable be even tougher to do so in conditions in which your adrenaline is pumping and camera smartwatch and the entirety is taking place very fast. And I'm asking folks that paintings in rapid-paced enviornments so that I can get an accurate idea of how many humans surely revel in the hassle we are seeking to resolve.

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57 minutes ago, ehliseo88 said:

I've noticed that telephones can once in a while be tough to get from your pocket in regular situations, and that were given me thinking that it'd probable be even tougher to do so in conditions in which your adrenaline is pumping and camera smartwatch and the entirety is taking place very fast. And I'm asking folks that paintings in rapid-paced enviornments so that I can get an accurate idea of how many humans surely revel in the hassle we are seeking to resolve.

Huh?

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  • 4 weeks later...

A service I used to work for put phones on the trucks to be able to do much of what you're talking about but not strapped to your forearm. You could carry it in (which I didn't), use it to take pictures of an MVC to send to trauma team (again, I never did), and send up reports while enroute to the ED (which I did do). I think that if you're thinking of using a phone for communication while on scene, that's inappropriate. Especially is in contact with family. I tend to think that sort of activity should be done away for others not connected with the family. 

These phones could be a good thing for EMS because they can help to record situations or conditions that contribute to the situation, such as ice, snow, etc. You can use them to transmit ECG's and other information to the ED. But in the event of a acute situation where your entire focus needs to be in the patient, drop the damn phone. You have the radio. Use it. We have become so reliant on our telephones and the computers we work with that if your systems dropped for whatever reason, I wonder how many of us could actually write a written report. I could, but I doubt anyone could read it. Trust me. Twenty one years in the Army and seventeen years in health care have destroyed my penmanship!! Before I left, I went back to using the radio to give report because it gave me the connection with the people I was going to hand my patient off to. 

 

Oooooor, I could be way off base. Just saying.....

 

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This is a dead topic, the original poster never came back and gave us more info.  

Cell phones on a call are a NO NO.  Don't even pull em out unless they are provided by your service.  Here are my reasons and I only have a couple

1.  They make you look stupid - like you cannot even stay off your phone for the length of a EMS Call.  

2.  Your EMS Agency should be providing equipment for you to communicate to the hospitals and other agencies, NOT you.  Your phone is your property not your companies - unless they want to pay part of your cell phone bill.

3.  If you are on any type of crime scene call or call that could be a law enforcement issue call and you pull out your phone - the officers on scene can suspect that you are taking pictures and confiscate your phone to pull evidence even if you are NOT taking photos.  The minute they do that you have effectively lost your phone until they determine it has no evidence. 

4.  it's just bad form to use your phone on a call unless it's for work and the public doesn't have a clue and will think you are making personal phone calls and not concentrating on the patient.  

JUST DON'T DO IT.  

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