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CT Paramedic Programs and UNH Paramedicine Degree question's


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Hi, going for my EMT-B cert in the fall and planning to continue on to paramedic studies. UNH caught my eye of an article posted from a few years back I found.

It made the program sound interesting as it would be a combo of fire science and paramedic studies, but just seems an extension of New Haven Sponsor program leading to a degree as an associate or bachelor. I really like UNH for their Master Fire Science program's they offer, but figure be less expensive to go to Yale Sponsor Hospital Program.

Does anyone know if Yale Sponsor Hospital program does rotations in various hospital areas? They mention on UNH they work clinical rotations on various floors, which I think is a great idea. I work with Bridgeport Hospital and in the Psych area, but don't believe I have seen any paramedic student's rotate through. I have seen a few EMT students in the ER though, so was curious.

Any recommendations on programs in Connecticut is it better to go through a college or an independent program? I think there is at least somewhere between five to seven programs in the state so curious if any recommendations on any of the programs would be awesome.

Appreciate any responses have a good one!!!

I am from the Valley of CT

I mean I really don't want to travel to Norwalk or Hartford, ha, but if it means I can become a medic after completing the program will go for it.

I was looking into:

Yale New Haven Sponsor Hospital program

Bridgeport Hospital Program

New Britain Medical Academy

Norwalk Community College

Capital Community College

I know there is Goodwin and UNH, but think they are super super super expensive in term's of program's, think I read close to $20,000. I miss NVCC not having a medic program any more :-( though!

Edited by UltrRnner87
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You will get a number of responses as to which way to go on education, but my 2 cents is get a degree based education.

As for the specific programs, I can't speak to them and you ask good questions, one thing you might want to do, to augment your search is look for facebook pages or groups that are close to you. There are more than likely groups that fit that bill.

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Welcome to the City. You'll get a wide variety of thoughts and opinions. Please weigh everything you'll read here accordingly.

I'll second the idea of pursuing a degree in whatever field you choose. It will help with employment. It will also help set you up for advancement within whatever organization or agency for whom you choose to work.

Barring a degree program, please pick a program that is accredited. If you choose to pursue National Registry certification program accreditation is required. At the very least look for a program accredited by these folks. Three of the programs you're currently considering are accredited.

A good paramedic program will offer a variety of clinical settings. This should absolutely be considered when researching programs.

Cost is also something to consider. EMTs are a dime a dozen. Paramedic jobs, depending on the job market, can be difficult to come by as well. Do your research for the area in which you want to live and work. It would really hurt financially to spend a lot of money on a program only to not get a job after the fact. This is especially true if you go into student loan debt to pay for it.

There is some contention regarding fire based EMS services. Without trying to rehash many of the discussions and debates held on the topic please be wary regarding fire based EMS departments. There are many problems regarding these combination departments with regards to personnel, organizational structure, equipment and more. If you're interested in reading more do some research into any of the big departments out there (FDNY where paramedic to FF is a promotion... really?!... Philly, Washington DC, Chicago, San Francisco etc...). Please also look at places like Boston EMS and King County Medic One (Washington) for examples on well run independent EMS services.

With your health care background have you considered alternatives to EMS? How about PA school? How about med school? You have options. Having options is a good thing.

Good questions. It's good to see you're putting as much thought into this as you're presenting here.

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Physician Assistant interest me. The only issue is I am 28 getting married in 20 month's wabt to establish myself with a career. With PA school it is I think it has more competition than a nursing program. In addition, tuition is high and have to stop working for two year's while in school.

As with nursing most employer's in the area really only hire BSNS state tuition for a program is high in the $40K. There is the accelerated program's, but again not working is not a viable option now like the PA program. There are ADN program's, but highly competitive with up to a 3 to 4 year waiting list to get in. Even after a year to year 1/2 of pre requisites can not have a guarantee getting into the program.

The other option waa the LPN program in the state, but cost $15 and takes two year's to complete with limited job opportunities.

Figure with being a medic can go to nursing when ready. Also can open up other avenues with my bachelor degree in area's of emergency management and promotions in the fire department. I researched job's for FF in my area found a lot of dual FF/Paramedic positions also another reason leaning that way.

Appreciate the responses so far.

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You've mentioned several different professions here. Are you looking for something easy? Or are you working towards something you want? You've now indicated that you've considered several avenues to the future. This is a smart thing to do. However, your arguments for not pursuing other options (PA, RN) aren't really arguments for not doing it. They're excuses for not doing it. The way you've presented it makes it sound like you think it's too hard to pursue it. You make it sound like pursuing and EMS or FD career will be easier and that fits in better with your motivation.

EMS is not necessarily the easier option.

As IslandEMT mentioned in your other thread there will be hundreds if not thousands of applicants for each FD spot not just in CT but in all of New England. The same will apply outside of New England, too, with pretty much every department from Florida to Maine. While it may look easier on paper to pursue the paramedic/FF route the reality is not as easy as it seems. Competition is stiff. If you're not a vet veterans hiring preference will automatically put you at a disadvantage no matter how many certifications you have to your credit. People spend years and years trying to get hired by FDs.

To push this one step further, and to give you something else to think about, do you want to be an EMS provider? Or do you want to be a firefighter. Why?

Sure, if you choose to go to PA school, nursing school, medical school or some other postbacc, graduate-level-education-required profession you'll be looking at time and a hefty amount of student loan debt. It might not be easy. But if it is what you want to do, not because it's the easiest path to something you think you want but because it is what you *WANT* to do, then the time required for school and the ensuing student loan debt can be managed.

Age should not be a factor in your consideration. You're still young enough that it's not a big deal no matter which path you pursue. Cost can be managed for higher education. Federal student loans, scholarships, grants and more are available to help finance not only your schooling but to help with cost of living, too. Your future spouse's support, of course, will be necessary.

That you're thinking all of this through and asking questions is a good thing. Please, though, don't pursue a particular path because you think it'll be easier. EMS is full of people who are trying to find the easy way. EMS needs people who want to be there to be EMS providers. This will sound harsh but we don't need hose-monkey wanna-bes. We need people who want to be health care providers. I'm not accusing you of being anything at this point. So please don't think I'm pointing fingers. But it sounds like you still have a lot of thinking to do and decisions to make.

To help put this in context I am speaking from first hand experience here. I went back to school after many years in the field (and in the air). I'm not just blowing hot air.

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not many are financially stable at your age. I know I wasn't and I had been married for 8 years.

Mike offers very good advice from someone who's been there as a street provider and eggbeater jockey to going back to school and working his butt off to get his P.A. at an older age.

My wife did a similar thing after being a teacher for 20 yrs with a M. Ed.

She went back to school in her 40's and got her ADN and then on to get her BSN, which is pretty much needed any more to get hired in most large hospitals.

Pay scale differences in Ct are huge from Paramedic to RN. close to triple the hourly rate and better benefits for a new hire.

I know Paramedics in CT that still make less than $20 / hr with seniority. Same here in Maine where a newb medic starts around $14-16/hr.

Me::: I don't get out of bed for less than $40/hr, But then I'm just an old retired EMS provider who enjoys being a carpenter now :-}

Due diligence in your end game will be a smart move at this point.

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I don't know many folks in our industry who are without worry when it comes to financial stability.

At my age while we don't owe any large mortgages ,but still don't have enough to just walk away and retire without working some to pay the never ending property taxes and excise taxes and normal things like taking a trip down to see a red sox game at Fenway.

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I don't know many folks in our industry who are without worry when it comes to financial stability.

At my age while we don't owe any large mortgages ,but still don't have enough to just walk away and retire without working some to pay the never ending property taxes and excise taxes and normal things like taking a trip down to see a red sox game at Fenway.

You could save some money by not wasting it on Red Sox tickets. :devil:

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