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So...I signed this new contract to provide services and it provided sufficient funding for me to buy some equipment upgrades for my home agency.

Of course I didn't research them beyond the "Hey, that's cool." factor. Now that I have some of these things, they're still pretty cool, but we haven't had much chance to use them in my tiny service.

So, have you guys ever used any of this stuff, and what do you think?

The Veinlite LED

The McGrath MAC video laryngoscope

The Thermal Angel

Sapphire infusion pump (For our new aviation division)

Edited by Arctickat
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I've used the McGrath, both 1st and 2nd gen. It's pretty easy to use since you have similar technique to a normal laryngoscope. The screen on the 1st gen was a little small and fogged easy but the 2nd gen was better. The batteries in the 1st gen crapped out at the worst times but this was corrected with Li-ion batteries in the 2nd. There is no peds blade. It's probably good for in the field, but I prefer the glidescope but it's a bit bigger and not nearly as portable.

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ERDoc, did it seem fairly stable? I mean holding in my hands seems like it is so lightweight it would fall apart. I understand that the indirect visualisation technique means you don't have to exert the forces associated with direct laryngoscopy, but if I had to use it for that I'm afraid it would fall apart in my hand.

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You would be surprised with the force you need sometimes. It's just used in a different way. It's sturdy so I wouldn't worry about that. The batteries and keeping the contacts clear were always out biggest issues.

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BCAS has had the KingVision video laryngoscope on car for a little over a year so far. It's an excellent tool when used appropriately. I've found suctioning technique is critical with video laryngoscopy. Sometimes you'll still have to go in with a mac/miller to suction first even if you are unable to obtain a cord view. I've developed a few different techniques for wet airways and have used it as a back-up (or sometimes primary) for the last year. With one technique I will go in direct with suction, leave the suction in place, then insert the video blade as I pull out the standard blade (works well with a severe fluid airway but requires a decent size mouth opening). With another technique I use a channeled blade and advance the suction just ahead of the camera lens to prevent it from being obscured (works well for moderately "wet" airways). Small mouth openings can still be difficult because the blades (both channeled and non-channeled) are a bit bulkier than standard direct blades. The McGrath appears to be a very similar design but likely somewhat higher quality.

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