Jump to content

Would You Run Emergency To This?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 48
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I work for the same service as cprted and yes we would go to this call L&S but it seems that maybe some things have been overlooked, Fell face first out of his wheel chair = rule in/out C-spin

"Do you?" and "Should you have to?" are two distinct questions in this. If your service's policy is that you do, then it probably would be wise to follow that (while also trying to prompt change).

Your patient is already in a state of altered mental status, might not be able to voice concerns or location of other pains. Me? due to that uncertainty, I'd do my best running L&S to the scene, a

Missouri law states that if your lights are on so is your siren. You either use both or you use neither. It's not an either/or issue no matter what time of day it is. Time of day is irrelevant. If you turn one on you turn both on. If you turn one off you turn both off.

Missouri is not the only state to mandate the use of both lights and sirens is an emergent response.

Get into an accident with only your lights on and no siren, it has happened, and you will lose. You will lose the lawsuit. You stand a good chance of losing your job.

Is it worth it to you?

Mike said it as good as I would have said it. If you drive with your lights on an no siren in Missouri then you are plain and simple no more of an emergency vehicle than the YUGO On the street next to you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Head injury + Warfarin (Coumadin) = CT scan for Sub Dural bleed.

True. A CT scan hastened by the meager amount of time saved running L&S with no current neuro deficits (outside of the patient's norm) however...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

But how long will the patient wait for the CT with a hematoma on his forehead. Elderly and nursing home bound. I can see this patient waiting in the ER for more emergent patients to go ahead of him.

Link to post
Share on other sites

True. A CT scan hastened by the meager amount of time saved running L&S with no current neuro deficits (outside of the patient's norm) however...

Given that the nearest CT scanner to me is 175 km away and that there will be a 2 hour delay in transport while my local docs piss around trying to figure out what to do...an emergent response would be unlikely because we're less than 2 minutes from the facility. However, the transport to the CT scanner may be a different story if there is a high risk of internal bleed or any indication of altered mental status.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the little (if no) information we have when we answer a call, we always use lights and siren, but keeping in mind that having priority isn't a good reason to die with it. If it's an "orange" call, it means the situation can be quite serious so we try to be as fast as we reasonably can.

If the pt needs a very quick transport, it's either the helicopter that will come, or 2 police bikes will open the way for the ambulance.

I can tell you I've crossed paris at 65 mph and never stopped, thanks to the bikes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a difference between cities. I cannot speak to traffic in Paris during the rush hour, when everyone is on the road, either going to, or returning from work. For me here in New York City, sometimes (regularly), there is no place to move out of the way, to allow any type emergency vehicle to proceed.

You will find that there is an ongoing discussion on EMT City regarding overuse of HEMS (Helicopter EMS), as well as too many reports of crashing helicopters due to possible pilot error in deteriorating weather conditions. In NYC, due to tall buildings, overhead power and telephone lines, and trees, not to mention a lack of committed landing zones, HEMS is not practical.

When a Medivac flight is needed, the NYPD can and will supply the helicopter, but the FDNY EMS Command has to supply an EMT or Paramedic to go with the patient. As it is extensive, I won't put up the requirements (again), unless requested, on requesting such medivac flight.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If the pt needs a very quick transport, it's either the helicopter that will come, or 2 police bikes will open the way for the ambulance.

I can tell you I've crossed paris at 65 mph and never stopped, thanks to the bikes.

This is why I love hearing from members in other countries. I am in an area that flys patients alot (we actually have a helo on standby at our local airport and three maintained LZ in town) so I can equate but the bikes :dribble: what I wouldn't give for that kind of escort during rush hour.

Edited by uglyEMT
Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...