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281mustang

Success for the Paramedic

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I know the Brady "Success for the ______" texts are already pretty well known in the EMS field, but I'm starting this thread anyway.

I have a case of inattentive ADHD which makes it pretty difficult to learn. I simply can't sit down by myself and read a book in paragraph form without having to get up almost immediately, but I can however force myself to make it through bullet point style snippets of information. I picked up this book and it's the best $30 I've ever spent. Information that you need to know in a clear and precise mannor, exactly what I was looking for. I haven't used the test format yet but am currently just skimming through the answers sections.

I've noticed a good bit of EMS providers suffer from ADHD, so I'm just throwing my personal experience out there for those that are in a similar situation.

Edited by 281mustang

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Are you currently attending Paramedic school or are you studying up prior to entry? With regard to attending Paramedic school as an ADHD adult I've certainly been there done that. It does present certain difficulties, but they are far from insurmountable.

If you haven't yet started I have two suggestions that really helped me prepare for Paramedic school. Firstly, learn your drugs through history taking. Every time you see a patient medication you're unfamiliar with look it up (indications, contraindications, drug intereactions, mechanism of action, the works). Eventually you will be able to direct a lot of your history questions based on the patients medication list (provided it's available of course). Secondly, every time you interact with a patient who has a presentation or diagnosis you're unfamiliar with look it up (pathophysiology, presentation, treatments, everything). If you work even a moderately busy unit for awhile before starting and actually do these two things, you'll fly through Paramedic school like it's nothing.

The method works so well for ADHD individuals for two reasons. One, they're short bursts of information. Two, it gives you the ability to relate what you've learned to actual case presentations you've witnessed.

Good luck to you. The learning never stops. If it does it's time to take your leave of the profession.

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I've noticed a good bit of EMS providers suffer from ADHD, so I'm just throwing my personal experience out there for those that are in a similar situation.

Yes, well ADHD/ADD was the "autism" of the 90's. Everyone whom learned as an individual rather than the way our school's model demanded of them was labeled with it.

Moving on before I offend someone......

I too learn under a different model than reading and memorizing words. I MUST have a concept of "why", for every single illness/treatment. Sitting to read a textbook to me, becomes like reading the maintenance manual for my truck. I can sit and read the whole thing, grab hold of a few important points, but the bulk is glazed over as I bask in the excitement of having a new truck. So by the time an oilchange is due, I can't find the drainplug let alone remember the oilfilter number.

Is my redneck showing??

My suggestion is video's. Grab a uncomfortable chair, some playdough to fiddle with, and start hunting down videos regarding pathophysiology, then how our drugs interact with that Patho.

Youtube is just great these days.

Check out: 02demand, ancient scholar, USMLE, to start.

That's how I got through most of my education, and people rarely die under my care.

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"I too learn under a different model than reading and memorizing words. I MUST have a concept of "why",""

I also find this is the only way I can learn.

Just throwing "how tos" at me doesn't help. I have to know why I am doing something, then suddenly the bulb gets brighter. Guess you can tell I wasn't a math major..

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I have not seen the books that you are describing but will purchase one in short order. I learn well in the outline format, in fact i outline every chapter of the textbooks so I can have a quick reference guide while studying. Thanks for the heads up on the books. I am all over checking them out.

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DFIB,

Found it on Amazon, may look into a couple of the books. Success for the Paramedic, and Success for the EMT-Basic. Can always use some brushing up!!

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DFIB,

Found it on Amazon, may look into a couple of the books. Success for the Paramedic, and Success for the EMT-Basic. Can always use some brushing up!!

Thanks Bro.

I am up to my eyeballs in school work right now but will most likely go ahead and order. Thank you!

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Are you currently attending Paramedic school or are you studying up prior to entry? With regard to attending Paramedic school as an ADHD adult I've certainly been there done that. It does present certain difficulties, but they are far from insurmountable.

If you haven't yet started I have two suggestions that really helped me prepare for Paramedic school. Firstly, learn your drugs through history taking. Every time you see a patient medication you're unfamiliar with look it up (indications, contraindications, drug intereactions, mechanism of action, the works). Eventually you will be able to direct a lot of your history questions based on the patients medication list (provided it's available of course). Secondly, every time you interact with a patient who has a presentation or diagnosis you're unfamiliar with look it up (pathophysiology, presentation, treatments, everything). If you work even a moderately busy unit for awhile before starting and actually do these two things, you'll fly through Paramedic school like it's nothing.

The method works so well for ADHD individuals for two reasons. One, they're short bursts of information. Two, it gives you the ability to relate what you've learned to actual case presentations you've witnessed.

Good luck to you. The learning never stops. If it does it's time to take your leave of the profession.

I actually completed my Paramedic program a bit ago but have yet to test out. Thanks though!

I too learn under a different model than reading and memorizing words. I MUST have a concept of "why", for every single illness/treatment.

YES! Someone finally understands my dilemma. From what I've heard Nancy Caroline's text is supposed to be the most 'cook book', but everything in there is presented from a "monkey see, monkey do" standpoint and it drives me up the wall.

When the material is presented like that it's extremely difficult to do anything other than memorize a bunch of crap for the test that will be forgotten by next week.

The Jon Puryear online prep course was good at presenting information in an informative context, but I would however like something that goes a little deeper.

Edited by 281mustang

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