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Patient Assessment Textbooks

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I am looking for more in depth patient assessment books. Just out of interest.

After 12yrs there's only so much you can keep re-reading the same info and I have recently started looking at more in depth patient assessment finding a lot of things I knew, but didn't. By that I mean I always knew some people put a clenched fist to their chest to describe chest pain, i never gave much thought to it consciously and what I didn't know was that it was called Levine's sign. Not necessarily something wholly new but still a patient assessment finding that can be significant to report.

Can anyone recommend a good text with patient assessment skills and these types of findings? I am looking for something in depth, maybe like a med school text. I know a lot of them recommend imaging or lab testing as part of the assessment and didn't know if there was anything out there that focused more on actual physical assessment without all the aid of things like CT scanners, blood draws and all the other fancy equipment we don't have the luxury of in the field.

Thanks

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Physical assessment is tied to knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathology.

The value of diagnostic testing e.g. biochemistry or imaging is to add to the physical exam and in most cases the majority of what will lead you to suspect X or Y comes from your assessment and history.

A book can teach you how to palpate for hepatomegaly or listen to cardiac sounds but unless you understand all the normal and abnormal reasoning behind it you are learning very little of value.

I suggest mastering something like Porths pathophysiology in tandem with Bates' guide to physical examination

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My A&P and patho knowledge is pretty solid. I am looking for something to challenge myself.

I have had Carol Porths patho book for a long time now. I used it throughout the program in college and have re-read it at least 3-4 times since then.

The Bates book looks interesting. I will have to check it out. Thanks

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Good on you mate, glad to see somebody taking an active interest in learning more for the benefit of their patient!

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I had a very early edition of this http://www.amazon.com/DeGowins-Diagnostic-Examination-Ninth-Edition/dp/0071478981/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331299472&sr=1-1 My NCOIC gave me at my first duty assignment. I found it very useful.

I still have 1981 edition still today, though it has survived my military service, 2 marriages, a career in paramedicine, and an anxious beagle. The duct taped cover is bullet proof.

Truthfully, we need a guide written for Paramedics, that isnt "Dumbed down" for paramedics, if you know what I mean.

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Thanks for the info. I couldn't agree more on the "dumbed down" texts that a lot of writers put out. I think a lot of them forget we aren't just ambulance drivers anymore.

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Thanks for the info. I couldn't agree more on the "dumbed down" texts that a lot of writers put out. I think a lot of them forget we aren't just ambulance drivers anymore.

Yes but when the acceptable standard is some vocational training with no college education required and a high school diplowmer is "recommended" then you have to wonder as to why that might be?

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Here in Ontario it is rare that people can even get accepted to the 2 year college Paramedic program without prior post secondary education. Most people take a 1yr general health science course prior to. Thats at least 3 yrs college education just to get into the profession. I guess things are just different here. To get to what most of the rest of the world calls "paramedic" we are looking at 4-5yrs college education.

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Here in Ontario it is rare that people can even get accepted to the 2 year college Paramedic program without prior post secondary education. Most people take a 1yr general health science course prior to. Thats at least 3 yrs college education just to get into the profession. I guess things are just different here. To get to what most of the rest of the world calls "paramedic" we are looking at 4-5yrs college education.

Can you go to Ottawa and tell the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care that the Symptom Relief Package designed in 1995 is no longer appropriate and given the high level of education for Primary Care Paramedic in Ontario there should be a sensible increase in scope of practice?

Thanks! :D

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