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Ive been searching all day and can't seem to find an answer I am hoping someone will be able to help me, I apologize if this is in the wrong forum.

I am looking to move to texas, I know to get reciprocity I would need to get NREMTB. However, I am wondering the differences in protocols between MD and TX. Is there a place where I can read the protocols online? (MIEMSS has this option). I know every state is different, I am mainly wondering drugs given, skills you are able to perform, ect. I saw on their website that they still use MAST there I haven't played with them since I got my EMT but I remember how to use them. Thanks!

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I do need to correct my statement. I called him a few nights ago and I was informed they carry approx 5 different narcs and approx 50 different medications for other uses. He added up all the ampules

Dude, you gotta have faith in the little man. I am gonna go drink some pirex now.

Ill definitely get back to you on the final numbers for the drug count. wouldnt be surprised if he gave me the total number of the drugs not the different kinds. And for that I do apologize

It depends where you go in TX as to what the protocols are. We do not use MAST at any of the three services i work at. Protocols differ from place to place. For example, one place I work Zofran is a paramedic only medication where you must obtain a 12Ld after administering the med and another place I work basics can give it without much thought. If you look at the NREMT skills that is a good place to start. Good luck to you.

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Ahh big difference. Here we have our protocols written by the state there are some jurisdictional differences (Some counties B's can use a glucometer in others its an ALS only skill) 911 side my bls only unit is equipped with a pulse ox, commercial it just changed to in 2014 all commercial bls units will carry them, before that it was a no no for some reason. I was looking at the Arlington area. I am still doing my research I'll go to the nr website and search around. Thanks again!!

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Hi Bleve.

Could you please take a moment to pay a little closer attention to your punctuation and grammar? This is a professional forum. Taking the effort to present yourself that way does count. It will also make your posts easier to read which, in the long run, will be more beneficial to you.

Thank you.

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I think that maximum protocol regulations are determined by the state and then can be adjusted down from there by individual services, right?

I can't help with your question, sorry about that, but we do have some wicked smart TX medics here, I'm sure that they will be able to help further when they get a second.

Dwayne

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While I believe you are looking specifically for EMT-basic information, this is found on our TDSHS web page.

Q: I am trying to find out the scope of practice for a paramedic. What is allowed for patient treatments, limitations, etc.?

A:
Texas does not have a rigid scope of practice for EMS personnel defined in rule or law as some other states do. That’s because Texas Medical Board rules allow physician-medical directors to delegate medical tasks to EMS personnel as long as they’ve trained and/or verified and documented the training, in the context of the Texas Medical Board language of 22 Texas Administrative Code, Section 197.1. Medical personnel with specific training and competencies may be able to perform skills outside the bounds of traditional practice if their medical director evaluates, provides additional training, authorizes them accordingly and develops protocols to match. For the purpose of this explanation, traditional practice may be defined as the knowledge and competencies described in the DOT National Standard Curriculum at each EMS training level.

Toni

edited for formatting

Edited by tcripp
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Man Ter..Heh...just kidding..Toni, that's pretty cool. I wonder how many states have that? Maybe many and I just wasn't aware of it?

So it sounds Brother as if the answer to your question, as stated above, will be service specific as opposed to state specific.

...a pulse ox ... in 2014 all commercial bls units will carry them, before that it was a no no for some reason...

The main reason is that the majority of basic providers don't have the education to understand that it's just a tool, nor the assessment skills to know that it's often a foul-able tool. To many times people are/were suffering, and/or dying because providers didn't treat them because the pulse ox said that they didn't need to.

I would rather give basic providers glucometers, which is still a mistake, then pulse ox.

Dwayne

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I would rather give basic providers glucometers, which is still a mistake, then pulse ox.

Dwayne

Dude, you gotta have faith in the little man. :whistle:

I am gonna go drink some pirex now. :turned:

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