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emtcutie

really difficult patient

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Why would I do a emergency c-section on a patien, way beyond my level of comfort. I don't remember being trained to do that. I would actually have no clue how to do it. Are you advocating that you would do it?

There is a whole story to the on scene c-section that I have shared here in the past but to suffice it to say, my friend had a physician on scence guiding him through the procedure. The physician just couldn't get into the car to do it himself. The car was upside down in a ditch with about a 2 foot area for one person to crawl into the car. The car was basically wedged between the sides of the ditch. So there was no more than 1 person getting into the car at one time.

Now if I had guidance via a physician outside the car telling me how to do it I would do it though.

I have stood first assist for many c-sections but would by no means consider that I am trained to do one. It is a serious abdominal surgery that involves two lives and my license to practice. It should never be taken lightly.

I agree, If a physician were present to direct and sign off I could be his/her hands but just can't see myself going solo.

In this scenario I would do as you did. Maintain perfusion as best I could and have a surgical team on standby at the receiving hospital.

Good call.

edited for spelling

Edited by DFIB

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I am new to the forum, but felt a need to respond to this post. To the OP, I understand where you are coming from. I got my EMT-B card about 3 weeks ago. Now, I admit, I have worked in the medical field for quite awhile and have seen some pretty "crazy" things, but I had a call right after I got my card that will live with me always. Let me preface this by saying that I lost my husband in a car accident; our daughter was 5 months old when he died, leaving me a widowed mother at the age of 27.

Called out for a wreck, car versus semi, head-on, semi on fire. Arrived on scene and stepped out of the rig just as the semi began exploding. I remember thinking "this is like a war zone". Young man in the car was DOA, and I was assigned to help with him. He was still (sort of) in the car, and the postion he was in defied nature. We rolled him over to body bag, and I will never, ever forget the look frozen on his face, and the way his legs and pelvis felt as we lifted him (it was mush). Transported to morgue, etc. We later learned this was a suicide and not an accident. I was calm and collected on scene, did my job, no problem. For two days following the call, however, I told myself I can't do this, my confidence is too shaken, I can't do it, I'm a freaking wreck and I don't belong in this field. But you know what? I talked to department members, family and friends about it, in great detail, and I am now a better EMT for it all, newbie or not. I will always remember it, especially since it was my first run as an "official EMT" and the images are burned in my brain. But I got past it, and I am still in love with EMS work, more than any other medical- based job I have ever had. I am on a vollie service in a rural area, and crashes/trauma are pretty common out here. This call prepared me for others like it, and that is how I chose to look at it. I agree with previous posts, talk it out as much as you need to, allow yourself to feel whatever emotions you have, and move forward. If you can't, don't be afraid or ashamed to seek professional help. I hope things get better for you.

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To the OP, I hope by now you have sought the help of a professional. You are not alone, many people have gone through the same thing and the listening ear and proper words of a counselor should work wonders for you.

Don't let it fester as were the words of several posters here. Your agency should have in place a critical support person that will meet with you individually or meet with the entire team on that call. Feel free to call on that person, because the mind you save may be your own.

I know there are a couple of things I would have to "step back" from, but if I am one of the two people on the team, I would be looking for encouragng words of wisdome.

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We will all have, or we have all had a call that brings us down, that's just part of being human. I can sit here, and run down a number of calls spanning more than thirteen years, and paint a picture in words of exactly what I did. What is disturbing to me, may not bother someone who sees a higher frequency of calls. I try not to carry them with me, but you'll run a few that will always be right there. The best thing you can do is talk it out, and move on.

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