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What do I tell the parents?


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Everyone does it a bit differently. Unfortunately in this business we do this quite often so we get to be somewhat good at it.

It always seemed that I was chosen to be the one to sit with the family. I was told that I had a way with the families, an empathy and a rapport with them that no-one on night shift had. I can't count the number of thank you's I've received from families that I sat with during their loved one's illness.

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Talk to them, don't treat them like idiots. This is the absolute hardest thing any parent will have to face and just talk to them and answer their questions, honestly. If they ask if their

All great advice! As a parent who has lossed a new born child. I would not wish this upon my worst enemy! What ever you tell the parents make sure it is the truth and remember when you

A couple of thoughts.... First is that you can spend some of that time reviewing the history with the parents. Normal birth? Any issues since? Any meds? What happened step by step leading up to

I think the biggest thing you can pull away from this is Do. Not. Lie. Every situation is different, there's no way to handle a specific case every single time. All I can do is repeat whats been said here, but the main point is be 100% honest. 100% of the time.

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Also, in almost any SIDS/Pediatric arrest scenario, you should not be on scene long enough to have much meaningful conversation with anybody. Scoop, run, drive.

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I agree Asys, but for the times that you are waiting for the coroner to arrive after you've determined the baby non-viable this is where your communication skills are tested the most.

In all the viable pedi arrests I've been to I've always grabbed the baby, started compressions and run to the ambulance. Do all the resus in the ambulance on the way to the hospital.

Many times the baby has been waiting at the curb on our arrival.

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I have to agree with Asys.... As per my local protocols ( i would do this regardless of local protocol) All peds codes are worked and transported to the ED. Even if it is obvious. I do work in a rural not as busy as many places service so we do have the time and availability generally. We do this for several reasons:

1. shows that EVERYTHING is being done for their child.

2. removes you and your crew from what could easily turn in to a dangerous and violent situation.

3. The hospital has a Chaplin, grief counselors, social workers, ect... that are better educated and paid for this situation.

4. police aren't always called and do not always make it to the call on time. see reason #2

I have worked several SIDS and baby codes and have always applied these reasons to why i have never left a child on scene and have never been questioned. Even when i worked in the larger city with staffing problems and black out periods i was never questioned or reprimanded for my efforts.

I am not saying that this is the right way to handle these calls but this is how i learned and continue to practice.

Race

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In most times I have been in this situation, it's hospital ER staffers who advise the parents the child, or other loved one, died. What I have been instructed to do, if I am asked, is varients of "The ER team is doing everything they can". If I already know they've stopped rescusitive efforts, I am instructed NOT to say anything to the effect of "brace yourself for possible bad news", as that Definitely falls under ER team purvue.

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