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EMT-B calling himself a 'Medic' in Indiana

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Hi there! Just wanting to see if it's "proper" to call yourself a "Medic" when you are EMT-B level. Indiana doesn't have the Advanced EMT status yet, and I'm done with cardiology (towards paramedic), but the EMT-BA and EMT-I levels here are going to poof eventually to catch up with the rest of the world. Is it proper to refer to yourself as a 'medic' if of EMT-B status, as I do have all paramedic skills (Just can't USE them outside of clinicals!), and all pharmacology, etc.?

Our instructor literally calls us 'paramedics' when he introduces us; we have a year until we can graduate, so -something- isn't right!

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I wouldn't go around introducing yourself as a "medic" yet - although "medic" doesn't necessarily equal "paramedic". I've worked with law enforcement tactical teams who have a first responder or an EMT on their entry teams that they refer to as a 'medic'.

As for your instructor... he may be doing that to build your confidence. It may also be a psychological thing to get you in the mindset of thinking and acting like a paramedic.

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Yeah, the mindset I have is not a typical alpha-type that's found in this area's EMS systems. I'm fairly meek and non-aggressive. Once I master something, I'm very comfortable (like calculus!)...but since you'd mentioned that about building confidence and all **My problem is that I want to see and work and take it all in. This area has skills taught -first-, but you don't do clinicals or just observe. I don't work for AMR or anything locally, because I'm a single dad of a special needs. I don't have the time to work/school/parent. I can get babysitters for short term, but for working and school, which is 12+ hours for my classmates, that's not quite possible. Is there a place to pick up/acclimate myself with use of protocols and procedures somewhere? Some of the Youtube videos do not seem correct against Indiana's skills sheets.

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Um, no

Oh and FYI if you think skills make or break a practice level you have a lot to learn

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110% agree with you!!

Around here, you seem to need to enroll in a class just to "observe" for 20 hours out of an entire semester. I wish it were concurrent like in nursing. Doing clinicals all throughout

Um, no

Oh and FYI if you think skills make or break a practice level you have a lot to learn

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You're right. Kick yourself out of EMS immediately. Sarcasm. Don't over analyze it.

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Anyone that cares about this is stressing over nothing. You have to learn not to care about little things, or you'll burn out early.

The unfortunate truth is that nobody but us knows what all those letters mean. And none of us likes to be called an ambulance driver, even if it is accurate. So "medic" is the logical default term for us all. Nurse is the default term for everyone from a CNA with a month of training (more than most EMTs) to a PhD Nurse Practitioner, and you don't often hear anyone except the freshest nursing school grads complain about it.

In paramedic school clinicals, the school nametags said "Paramedic" on them, even though we had only completed the classroom portion.

No big deal, unless intentionally misrepresenting one's licensure for practice. If so, that's a whole 'nother story.

Edited by Dustdevil
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Nurse is the default term for everyone from a CNA with a month of training (more than most EMTs) to a PhD Nurse Practitioner, and you don't often hear anyone except the freshest nursing school grads complain about it.

Totally off topic here, but DNPs area becoming militant about being called doctor because they have a doctorate level degree. It has gotten to the point that some hospitals have to institute a policy that only MD/DOs can call themselves doctors so as not to confuse pts. It's more than just the recent grads, just ask Mary Mundinger and her legions. Sorry to go so off topic, but if interested, check out studentdoctor, where it has been discussed ad nauseum.

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No argument there. That's why I specifically avoided mentioning that term. Hell, I remember thirty years ago people complaining about clergymen being called "doctor" in the hospital. Pharmacists too.

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I've never met anyone else in the hospital (pharmacists, PT/OT, PA, etc) who wanted to be called doctor. I'm not sure what it is with the DNPs.

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