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Mimi1199

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For the record, and thanks to those who came to my defense: I am not against higher education, but we know two things as fact: There is a good chance this person will not even attend or complete EMTB school, as we all know the drop-out rate for any EMS class. Secondly, even if she passes with the highest score possible, she will probably not find a job anytime soon. So to me, to spend money to take extra classes for a career you are not even in yet, is a waste of money, unless her back-up plan is another healthcare related field. But if she chose to be a Nurse for instance instead, there is a good chance her Nursing school would not recognize the AP course, so she would have to take it again. Once she becomes an EMTB and knows that she loves the career then I think she should take every class possible.

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I think the guy who predicted the end of the world will be wrong again it may just end tomorrow because I actually agree with Flaming and I can kind of understand the logic behind that last post. And I never thought I would do this based on other posts but Kudo's

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I appreciate all the input everyone has had on my question. I'll take it all and make a decision soon. I see both sides and an leaning towards taking the A&P courses after the EMT-B course this fall. And I love the fact that you guys are so passionate about your opinions. Even if you do tend to knock heads once in a while. :P

There is a good chance this person will not even attend or complete EMTB school, as we all know the drop-out rate for any EMS class. Secondly, even if she passes with the highest score possible, she will probably not find a job anytime soon.

Thanks for the positivity in this post, btw.. :lol:

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I took anatomy and physiology as separate courses and I did not ahve general bio nor did I have general chemistry. I took the anat/phys classes at a well respected community college with a very very highly regarded paramedic program.

Unfortunately, I didn't live in Kansas so I was passed over twice based on not being a instate school resident.

But I took my pre-req's that the school required before I got into paramedic school on the Missouri side.

Looking back, I would highly recommend a chemistry course before taking anatomy and physiology.

Take care,

chbare.

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So to me, to spend money to take extra classes for a career you are not even in yet, is a waste of money, unless her back-up plan is another healthcare related field.

Right. Because any education one can obtain is useless unless there is a specific career goal in mind for taking it.

So, since I'm not an English professor should I have taken all of those English/literature classes? How about those math classes? I'm not a mathematician. Still a waste? I guess those Spanish language classes were a waste, too? And history? And psych? Sociology? Philosophy? Theology? I mean, as I'm not pursuing a career in any of those fields was all of that college level education wasted?

Is that *seriously* what you're arguing?

It doesn't matter what you're studying or why you're studying it, there is no such thing as a wasted education.

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From Bunker Hill Community College in Boston, MA

<snip>

I don't doubt there are some schools that provide a watered down AP course with no pre-requisites required in some parts of the country. In that case, by all means take these courses.

Well, I was hoping for some examples from America, but thanks for the effort. As I speculated, you are making your observation from an extremely limited sampling. Most every nursing, respiratory therapy, radiology, and paramedic degree programme in the country includes two semesters of A&P without a BIO prerequisite. And they are not "watered down." Having both a nursing and a biology degree myself, I can assure you that there is no good reason for such a requirement. Knowing that birds have hollow bones, and cockroaches breathe through their skin, did nothing to help my understanding of my patients. To quote Dr. McCoy from Star Trek, "Dammit, Jim! I'm a doctor, not a veterinarian!"

As for negative points on posts, I guess I never considered the different reasons that people give (or take) them. But I generally do so to recognise either the validity, profundity, or helpfulness of someone's information. Consequently, I don't have any problem with Lone Star's vote.

Edited by Dustdevil

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I attended a Continuing Medical Education class last night, and the lecturing DO, connected with the North Shore/Long Island Jewish Hospital system, advised us that he had all his Medical Students ALSO take EMT!

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Right. Because any education one can obtain is useless unless there is a specific career goal in mind for taking it.

So, since I'm not an English professor should I have taken all of those English/literature classes? How about those math classes? I'm not a mathematician. Still a waste? I guess those Spanish language classes were a waste, too? And history? And psych? Sociology? Philosophy? Theology? I mean, as I'm not pursuing a career in any of those fields was all of that college level education wasted?

Is that *seriously* what you're arguing?

It doesn't matter what you're studying or why you're studying it, there is no such thing as a wasted education.

No, because most of the classes you listed are what are considered core courses that are needed for any degree, so it does not hurt you if you take it and then change majors. Unfortunately A&P is pretty much limited to healthcare, so I have to agree with flamer on that one. Once she gets through EMTB and passes, then she should take other health care courses.

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No, because most of the classes you listed are what are considered core courses that are needed for any degree, so it does not hurt you if you take it and then change majors. Unfortunately A&P is pretty much limited to healthcare, so I have to agree with flamer on that one. Once she gets through EMTB and passes, then she should take other health care courses.

And that's exactly what I've decided to do. Thank you all for your input. :)

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No, because most of the classes you listed are what are considered core courses that are needed for any degree, so it does not hurt you if you take it and then change majors. Unfortunately A&P is pretty much limited to healthcare, so I have to agree with flamer on that one. Once she gets through EMTB and passes, then she should take other health care courses.

So you see no value in learning A&P outside of a health care profession?

While you had no way of knowing this, the classes I listed were required classes as part of the college degrees I have earned. Some were, in fact, core courses. Most were specific to degrees. So are you still going to argue that it was all wasted since I'm not doing a job related to what the degrees were?

If you choose to continue to argue that point, are you willing to argue that the vast majority of people out there with college degrees who do not work in the field specific to their degree have wasted all that time and money?

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