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Civilian Pararescue/SWAT


Gin121

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You might be a dude, but the cartoon panel I referred to is still a woman. No offence intended.

FYI, my mom's mom retired as an NYC Board of Education assistant principal, mom and sister retired as BoE teachers, brother is actively an American History Professor (PhD) at the University of North Dakota. It could be said that I am trying to do some teaching here (heck, I pontificate all the time on EMT City).

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Dwayne, Although I appreciate your experience and expertise, I have not gotten my research off tv shows. I have compiled good hard thought out data. You are seeing a tiny clip from a thread and hanging on some words and taking them out of context....

I am just starting my career in EMS at age 37. I've always wanted to be a Cop bc of the excitement and adrenaline rush that goes along with the job. Since I'm now over the age limitit for PD in my area, I've decided to go EMT/Paramedics as it shares similar exciting qualities as PD. Does anyone know if there are civilian Pararescue or SWAT opportunities on Long Island?

I created my thoughts from there. What part did I take out of context? Your ejaculation may not have been premature, but it's clear that an orgasm is your primary driving force here. Paramedic medicine is a calm, professional, educated endeavor...there should be no sprayin' going on at all.

Again Dwayne, all do respect, don't go making ill advised and judgemental posts...

Again, I'm unclear which part of my post was ill advised, and I believe the judgmental TV comment was reasonably supported. I'll be more than happy to discuss this and/or explain my reasoning but I'm going to need you to be more specific if you can.

Remember this is an open forum for people to "put it out there" and get ideas and share thoughts. My 2 cents....

Having been a member of this forum for a few days longer than you I'm confident that I almost always remember what it's about. What it's not is a coffee house, a volly fire house where we share bullshit stories of glorious heroism, or a place where we try and encourage new members to get started off with misconceptions. My post was intended to help you, and it's unfortunate if it offended you, but you should also know that above all else EMS is a profession of introspection and hard truths.

Truly, all due respect to you as well.

Dwayne

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Gin someone once told me a great lesson to be learned from a job in this field.

EMS is 95% Boredom with 5% Oh Shit most of the time.

Don't take offense to what folks are telling you here. I had my bottom spanked a few times when I first joined (Dwayne, AK and Dust especially). I basically gave the finger to them and wanted to walk away. One day I sat down and really read what everyone was trying to tell me. They were helping me grow and become a better provider. It their emergency not ours. We have to be the rock by which everyone else gauges the situation. If we are all Mel Gibson on scene it will deteriorate very quickly around us. If we are stoic and unemotional things seem to calm down and we get our job done. Fine after the call go punch a rig, ball your eyes out, curse the gods whatever you feel you need to do. But during the call its 100% Joe Cool.

We learn to compartmentalize things. Like a light switch we go from clowning around with a partner to Joe EMT back to clowning around. It does take a toll BUT it has many rewards. What is amazing is the fact its not the calls you think will be the emotional ones its the one that sneaks up one you or even a routine transfer type call. Check the threads you will read many stories of the ones that struck a person. Myself included.

As far as Flight Medic or nurse. In my area they are extremely hard to come by. Usually need air medic military or LEO experience. The program is ment to weed out the adrenline seekers and usually the folks that are on the bird are the most professional, Cool Hand Luke, folks I have ever met. It is usually years before these folks made it on a bird and that was usually after their life experience and either doing alot of ER time or becoming a nurse themselves. Its not something you just apply for or go to school for. You basically have to earn your way in.

As it pertains to SWAT. Again samething here applies. Most are seasoned LEO or ex-military and transitioned to medic by taking the program but ina ll are still trained law enforcement officials. In the local dept in my area the SWAT medic was on the team for 3 years before becoming a medic and before that he was on the force close to 5 or 6 years. In the next team over the medic was 15 years Army medic with alot of combat time before joining the force, then after that a few years regular LEO before being asked to the team. Again its not something applied for or taught its earned.

I am not trying to discourage you from persuing EMS. By all means join the ranks. Go to school get your B liscense and ride, see what it is really like out on the streets. Apply to school and go for your AAS or Cert and become a Medic and become the best Medic you can be. Hell after Medic go for your NP or RN and finally make a paycheck. You like training you said, with all the CEUs that you need to keep your liscense current there is no shortage of it. Even if your State liscensure only requires X amount of credits doesn't mean you can't do more. Go to confrences, attend lectures, write, publish, be a guest speaker it is all in the cards if you push yourself to be the best Medic you can be.

Hopefully some of what I said helps and helps you in your decision. One thing I have learned in the few years I have been here and as an EMT... I should have done it sooner!!!

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I am just starting my career in EMS at age 37. I've always wanted to be a Cop bc of the excitement and adrenaline rush that goes along with the job. Since I'm now over the age limitit for PD in my area, I've decided to go EMT/Paramedics as it shares similar exciting qualities as PD. Does anyone know if there are civilian Pararescue or SWAT opportunities on Long Island?

You have a long way to go before pursuing the pararescue or SWAT line of work.

EMS is not a field to go into because you are an adrenaline junkie or that you love the excitement and adrenaline rush that goes along with the job.

Trust me when I say that you are going to be sorely disappointed in the adrenaline rush aspect of the job. You may get one good call a day or maybe one a week. Depending on what you call a good call.

You will be bored at times.

I have dealt with many adrenaline junkies in my 19+ years of EMS experience and in my experience many of those so called adrenaline junkies fall into two camps. Camp 1 is the burned out grizzled old medic who hates his job but still does it because it's all he knows and camp 2 are those who are no longer in EMS. Some have fallen through the cracks and do not fit that mold or the 2 camps but those are few and far between.

So if you are going in to this field for the adrenaline rush, then STOP RIGHT NOW and re-evaluate why you are really wanting EMS as a career. If it's purely for the adrenaline rush then you are not the partner I want to work with. I've seen enough adrenaline junkies in 19 years to be pretty correct in making that statement.

Why did you wait so long to pursue the adrenaline rush, why didn't you pursue police work earlier?

And let's also remember that police work is not all adrenaline rush based either. I know many officers who work in small towns or mid size towns who have never drawn their guns.

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And let's also remember that police work is not all adrenaline rush based either. I know many officers who work in small towns or mid size towns who have never drawn their guns.

Even in big cities. I know a few 30 year and retired NYPD cops who never fired their weapons, except as required at the Rodman's Neck Range.

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I have dealt with many adrenaline junkies in my 19+ years of EMS experience and in my experience many of those so called adrenaline junkies fall into two camps. Camp 1 is the burned out grizzled old medic who hates his job but still does it because it's all he knows and camp 2 are those who are no longer in EMS. Some have fallen through the cracks and do not fit that mold or the 2 camps but those are few and far between.

Ruff .. isn't that what one could call gross generalization or stereotyping ?

No Camp 3 ?

Just saying that this thread has focused and pretty much beaten to death, the adrenaline junkie aspect .. most seriously when tones go off (and in Ontario Canada)in Fire Halls and Ambulance Halls. The physiological response was and can actually measured, the findings were very clear that with loud tones a "startle reflex" kicks in (btw it also is associated with increased cardiac risk) but the human body no matter what anyone on this board eludes there is a conditioning that one goes through. A counter argument / position could be taken that when an individual does NOT have a physiological response then they should get out of this profession, a lack of response could indicate true burn out or a pathological situation ... look to 4c6 he's loosing his mind because of NO calls (and others in comments areas)

Lets look at the background this poster states he has, lets forget that he at least has 4 years of University, think B.Ed is a cake walk ? Compare that to I'm a silly student First Aider girl ...te hee hee and I like flowers but I want to be a SWAT medic and pack a .40 cal glock ... he he he ... put things into perspective. jeeze uzz.

1- ATF ... well if anyone has had any experience in that area thats totally "cool under pressure" and while multitasking this is the entire goal of that training. Hundreds of lives in the balance, just say runway 320 Alpha vs runway 320 B ... think about that please.

2-A teacher in Phys ED, hmmm ... thanks not my cup of coffee (I have 2 teenagers thanks that is more than enough) but leadership, tolerance and supportive, would be I highly suspect be some attributes, then dealing with soccer mums .. yikes.

ps How can you tell a pit bull from a soccer Mom ? ... umm lipstick.

I am just damn happy he's not an English lit teacher .. because we would all be screwed for grammar, punctuation and especially myself as the KING of the run on, and on sentence. :whistle:

In Closing .. I have to call you all on the Flight Paramedic (yes there are lots that are good at what they do) but please after actually doing the Flight gig, 4000 hour with patients documented, Rescue Helo Long Sling and on to specialized ICU transport team's. Your all full of shit ... these flight suited guys and girls have the biggest egos on the frigging planet ... check out any of the "flight" sites and tell me I am wrong .

<insert puking smiley>

cheers

<edited to make post look better and include reprimand >

Edited by tniuqs
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Thanks for the replies guys. I think we need to get off the "adreneline junkie" status. Perhaps I would have been better off stating that I like the unknown of responding to a scene that requires a survey, analysis and a response all while possibly having to deal with a hostile or psych. ... (deep breath), ahhh fu+* it, adreneline junkie is easier to say so I'm fine with that title! Aaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhh. I digress ........

.... again, I am a former Physical Education Teacher and am a current HS Lacrosse Coach. I am a former ATC which, trust me here folks, was a crazy hard process to even enter into (pat on my back, 3.82 GPA) let alone stay in through 9 11. I have credentials outside of the EMS field, yes I'm EMS virgin, up the ying yang including Fugitive Recovery Agent, Alarm Responder, Personal Security and a healthy dose of weapons experience.

I appreciate all the thoughts and suggestions but if we can move on to more positive corrective reinforcement rather than statements like "getting research from tv shows" (uuuuggg, so dumb) I would very much appreciate it. There is no place in this world for ignorance. Just my 2 cents.

.... side note, oh how I wish my DROID had spell check. If typos found, my appologies.

Ruff .. isn't that what one could call gross generalization or stereotyping ?

No Camp 3 ?

Just saying that this thread has focused and pretty much beaten to death, the adrenaline junkie aspect .. most seriously when tones go off (and in Ontario Canada)in Fire Halls and Ambulance Halls. The physiological response was and can actually measured, the findings were very clear that with loud tones a "startle reflex" kicks in (btw it also is associated with increased cardiac risk) but the human body no matter what anyone on this board eludes there is a conditioning that one goes through. A counter argument / position could be taken that when an individual does NOT have a physiological response then they should get out of this profession, a lack of response could indicate true burn out or a pathological situation ... look to 4c6 he's loosing his mind because of NO calls (and others in comments areas)

Lets look at the background this poster states he has, lets forget that he at least has 4 years of University, think B.Ed is a cake walk ? Compare that to I'm a silly student First Aider girl ...te hee hee and I like flowers but I want to be a SWAT medic and pack a .40 cal glock ... he he he ... put things into perspective. jeeze uzz.

1- ATF ... well if anyone has had any experience in that area thats totally "cool under pressure" and while multitasking this is the entire goal of that training. Hundreds of lives in the balance, just say runway 320 Alpha vs runway 320 B ... think about that please.

2-A teacher in Phys ED, hmmm ... thanks not my cup of coffee (I have 2 teenagers thanks that is more than enough) but leadership, tolerance and supportive, would be I highly suspect be some attributes, then dealing with soccer mums .. yikes.

ps How can you tell a pit bull from a soccer Mom ? ... umm lipstick.

I am just damn happy he's not an English lit teacher .. because we would all be screwed for grammar, punctuation and especially myself as the KING of the run on, and on sentence. :whistle:

In Closing .. I have to call you all on the Flight Paramedic (yes there are lots that are good at what they do) but please after actually doing the Flight gig, 4000 hour with patients documented, Rescue Helo Long Sling and on to specialized ICU transport team's. Your all full of shit ... these flight suited guys and girls have the biggest egos on the frigging planet ... check out any of the "flight" sites and tell me I am wrong .

<insert puking smiley>

cheers

<edited to make post look better and include reprimand >

Well said and thanks for having my back Mav!

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If you were a english Lit teacher you wouldn't need spell check ha ha

Seriously all kidding aside, keep with your dream. If you want to be a swat medic or whatever there is nothing stopping you. Well maybe your age when you get done with all you listed in a previous post but then again, you might have a entirely different set of career desires by the time you are done with Nursing school.

Get your EMT-b and do some rides or paid work with a service. You will find that you may not even like ems after the third person pukes all over your shoes and pants.

But maybe you still will.

Don't not ask questions and keep asking. I'm still asking questions and I thought at one time I knew it all.

We aren't here to bust your balls but we are here for honest open and valid debate and education.

Good luck.

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In Closing .. I have to call you all on the Flight Paramedic (yes there are lots that are good at what they do) but please after actually doing the Flight gig, 4000 hour with patients documented, Rescue Helo Long Sling and on to specialized ICU transport team's. Your all full of shit ... these flight suited guys and girls have the biggest egos on the frigging planet ... check out any of the "flight" sites and tell me I am wrong .

I guess from what I have in the few minutes the pt was packaged had me jaded. I figured a little "I'm the best of the best." swagger was there but didnt realize more beyond the personal involvement on scene. I will state I have never met one outside of an EMS scene so I do have limited experience. I also guess that the job websites or information pages from the local Flight Medivac in my area painted a rosie picture. For that I digress. In every field we have them so I was nieve to think it wasn't there either.

Getting back to Gin. I understand what you ment. As I got into this field in my 30s as well, sometimes we search for the words to describe what is in our heads.

The unknown is as you said what your looking for. Thats the best way of describing it. The fact that from day to day you will be experiencing new things, its dynamic not static. Thats what you are looking for. For that EMS is perfect, even in a transfer position, things will change daily.

EMS is a great field. I fell in love with it after my first ride along. I love the challenge of pushing yourself and also knowing that every time we are called we are making a difference in someone's life. Even if it is just a shoulder to cry on, put a bandaid on a 2 yr old knee, talk with a lonely elderly patient that just lost their partner, doesn't matter at that point you are making a difference to them.

Yes when the tones drop your heart rate goes up, the adreline kicks in, and you feel a physiological change. Its natural. It happens. So does the dry spells, the times when you wish you had a call. Its all part of the industry.

Again EMS is a great field to be in. You definatly know how to handle stress and you have life experience. All of which will make you a great EMT. Just don't get into it for the wrong reasons.

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Well said and thanks for having my back Mav!

Nope Mav is my little brother, my call sign is Squint ... for very good reason, its the look on my face when the BS "tones" go off, so I have been told.

I am so Crappy at poker ... :angry:

I guess from what I have in the few minutes the pt was packaged had me jaded. I figured a little "I'm the best of the best." swagger was there but didnt realize more beyond the personal involvement on scene. I will state I have never met one outside of an EMS scene so I do have limited experience. I also guess that the job websites or information pages from the local Flight Medivac in my area painted a rosie picture. For that I digress. In every field we have them so I was nieve to think it wasn't there either.

Off topic just for a bit: The swagger in most cases is most cases earned and sometimes the difference between confidence in oneself and arrogance, viewed by some that have never had to wear Nomex 3A, as arrogance (some cases its true)this can be difficult to determine from a distance. If you pick up what I am saying is a backassward way.

I teach "walk with purpose" doing triage at an MCI often the way one holds themselves (body language) tells a lot ... just for fun can you pick out who is IC in this picture ?

post-8540-0-99468300-1297358313_thumb.jp

cheers

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