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When I figure out how to use the flatbed scanner, I'll post a picture of my badge from when EMS was NYC HHC EMS. It's a stop-sign shaped thing. That one was replaced by the "PD style" badge, which I also have.

When FDNY took us over (the "Merger"), we were told not to wear them anymore, in what was felt to be a Star Trek "Borg" maneuver to assimilate us in. "Firefighters don't wear badges, why should you EMS guys?" We were also told to get the FD Blue uniforms, and lose the Hunter Green Pants, Jackets and ties, with white shirt that had been our uniform.

As a possible proof of the assimilation, don't your officers wear a white dress cap as part of their Class A Dress Uniforms? For a long time after the Merger, the top EMS 4 Star Chief was only allowed a Blue one, with Gold Band and the "scrambled eggs" on the brim. After 5 years, EMS Captains and Chiefs finally got the "right" to wear the white hats, like their Fire Suppression side equivalents in rank.

Personally, I think losing those green pants was a step in the right direction (no offense). Those things we so 1970s. Just my opinion though.

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Yeah, but the green pants with the old style "roller" lights going could have provided some SERIOUS disco action...

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I got to thinking about this issue a bit and it dawned on me that a badge is a symbol of authority, not just arrest powers. And there are certainly times in EMS work where you need to exert some authority, particularly when dealing with bystanders. I realize that usually we don't really have much if any legal authority (although in some places FFs do have arrest powers at emergency scenes if a person is interfering) but sometimes a firm voice and attitude is enough. Other times it's not, and you don't always have PD with you. People are accustomed to following the orders of someone with a badge so I can see where it could be an advantage to wear one.

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I got to thinking about this issue a bit and it dawned on me that a badge is a symbol of authority, not just arrest powers... People are accustomed to following the orders of someone with a badge so I can see where it could be an advantage to wear one.

That remains my feeling, and attitude. I hope FDNY allows EMS to go back to wearing the badge proudly, from their outermost garment, even if they don't let us wear the awards ribbons over it, like we used to.

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Hennepin County medical Center which provides EMS fro 90% of Minneapolis and about 13 other 'burbs (40,000 calls/year) wears a uniform that consists of a ligth brown shirt, drak brown pants and they wear a badge. the unifrom looks real sharp, but a bit too close to LEC for me. if you follwo the link at the bottom, then click on "launch the project" and the click on paramedic, you can see what it all looks liek, and it is kinda cool and interactive, plus it is the wife of my medic instuctor, so thats kinda neat.

http://www.startribune.com/heroes/

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I agree with the badges making you look like an FNG, or at the very least a buff. EMS does not need badges. All you need is something on your sleeve or back that states your level of training so that at a scene you can easily be identified.

Just because your company requires you to have something does not mean that they are required to supply or even pay for it (at least in NYS). I worked for a company that required us to pay for our own uniforms and even our own oxygen regulators. This made many people quite mad, so an occupational lawyer was consulted and they were told that as long as the company is not asking for anything unreasonable there is nothing that can be done. Even the O2 regulator was not considered unreasonable. The only saving grace was that if you saved your receipts you could use it for your taxes.

Only if you itemized (use schedule A) on your taxes.

EMS around here used to wear white shirts. Looked nice but I always wondered if they were hard to keep clean. (I would have a problem keeping them clean.)

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Hennepin County medical Center ... wears a uniform that consists of a ligth brown shirt, drak brown pants and they wear a badge. the unifrom looks real sharp, but a bit too close to LEC for me.

Agreed. Whatever they look like, they do NOT look like medical professionals to me.

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To add to the badge thing.

I sent my 93 year old grandmother a pic of me in my dress uniform, the first thing she said when she saw my mother was, when did he become a cop ?

Badges are nice for showing off in parades and at ceremonies,showing respect at funerals but in the field I really don't see a purpose.

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To add to the badge thing.

I sent my 93 year old grandmother a pic of me in my dress uniform, the first thing she said when she saw my mother was, when did he become a cop ?

hehe... that uniform actually looks pretty familiar. Check this out. :lol:

album_pic.php?pic_id=534

That little kid is me headed for work in 1979. :shock:

If it weren't for the gun, it wouldn't look any different from the Hennepin County EMS uniform.

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An alternative to wearing a badge we used at Martin County EMS was to wear the agency insignia on one sleeve, the America flag on the other and either an EMT or paramedic patch above the left breast pocket in place of a badge. FD did wear a badge on their Class A uniforms. When on duty they could wear either their Class A shirt or a department issued T-shirt with the FD insignia on the left breast and large MCFD letters on the back. Even those guys who preferred to wear the Class A shirt around the station (mostly supervisors) usually wore the T-shirt underneath and would pull the Class A shirt off before pulling on their bunker gear.

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