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How would you treat this pt?


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This stuff:

http://www.sweatnspice.com/proddetail.php?prod=429

Hottest stuff in the world...16 million on the scoville scale. They say it's not meant to be consumed and its for "collectors and experimental" purposes.

The product only contains 1ml of the stuff...pure capsicum.

If a person consumed this 1ml...what would be the signs/symptoms?

How would you treat for a pt who has consumed this product?

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After reading the blog, I'd have to say that standard exposure protocols would probably not work. You'd have to take those protocols over the top and keep going. One would have to be very aggressive and very generous. Especially with pain management. 16,000,000 Scollville units, I believe, would more than likely hold the world's record. Anything you have to handle with tweezers and latex gloves should be considered a hazardous material.

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Me and another person were talking in chat about this scenario. If a pt. did consume this product, the member said that chances are the pt's airway will swell up quickly.

Would an epi-pen do anything to help this pt? Afterall...this isn't an allergic reaction.

Would pain management even help this patient?

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Me and another person were talking in chat about this scenario. If a pt. did consume this product, the member said that chances are the pt's airway will swell up quickly.

Would an epi-pen do anything to help this pt? Afterall...this isn't an allergic reaction.

Would pain management even help this patient?

I would be less concerned about a swollen airway (as you said, not an allergic reaction, unless of course, the Pt is allergic...) as opposed to copious secretions-thus creating an airway issue.

Actually, now that think of it, I would make the assumption that atropine, given as you would for a organophosphate poisoning, would work to tame the secretions-if they become too much of an issue.

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The secretions are the patient's only defense against the intrusion. I don't think I'd want to take it away from them. The epi might be a consideration, though I'd probably consider racemic first. The soft tissue swelling would be a real problem, and should probably treat it as a burn of the oro-/laryngopharynx.

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