Jump to content

120 Hours to obtain NREMT-B????


Recommended Posts

I've seen numerous references to NREMT-B certification being a 120 hour class. How often does someone pass the NREMT-B written and practical tests with just those 120 hours. I passed the state NREMT-B practicals in March and the NREMT-B CBT in April - here's my hours spent pursuing it:

EMT-Basic class time - 120 hours

Study time in conjunction with class (book learning) - 120 hours

Emergency Department Clinicals - 50 hours

BLS / ALS Ambulance ride alongs - 40 hours

Practicals / NREMT-B CBT preparation - 50 hours

I did sign up for extra clinical and ride along shifts - the bare minimum was 5 patient contacts, which seemed way too light.

As it turned out, the ER clinical time was probably the most valuable time I invested, since I saw patients with a wide variety of illnesses/injuries that could take months or even years to see in the field as I volunteer with a low-volume rural service (No volly flames, please).

I probably estimated low on book learning and test prep times, which does not include time on EMTCity, etc. :lol:

Having said this, I have no illusions that this training comes close to NREMT-P training time commitments or skill sets, but I do wonder if people actually get NREMT-B certified and State licensed with just 120 hours of class time.

Feel free to detail your hours spent for whichever NREMT certification you wish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, I don't know the number of people who take and pass a 120 hour course. What I do know, thought, is that the NHTSA minimum length is 110 hours (http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ems/pub/emtbnsc.pdf page 5). To be honest, it takes a lot more than 10-20 hours to make a difference anyways. 10 hours in only 2-3 more days of training (assuming that class runs, on average, 4-5 hours).

Link to post
Share on other sites

My class was 120 hours plus 24 hours in the ER and 72 hours in the ambulance

I passed my first time so I'm one who made it thru and passed

Link to post
Share on other sites

My initial basic course was 130 hours long. It was integrated into my Army AIT. The EMT phase of training was just over two weeks long. At the time, four booklets covered the material. They were called modules. Delta 1-4, or what we called the Delta modules covered the material. You could teach somebody to pass NREMT in about 1/3 of the time if that is your goal.

Take care,

chbare.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Going back to my dinosaur-pulled ambulance...

In 1974, when I first was in class for what now is New York State EMT-B, not NREMT, which I wouldn't hear of for a few more years, the initial (basic) class was 45 hours, refresher was 20-25 hours.

In 2007, I am told the classes for the initial class is something larger than 125 hours. My last refresher, in that year, was about 64 hours, as taught by the FDNY EMS Academy, for FDNY EMS personnel.

Could some other New York State EMT who is NOT trained by the FDNY give an update as to the current refresher class length?

Just putting this in as food for thought.

Link to post
Share on other sites

hi,

the hours you guys are talking about , are they the hours for your basic class ? i just graduated from basic school 200 hours. and i was told that if i want to take the nremt-b exam i only have to take the written part if i do so within 1 year of graduation.... how hard is it is it like the test in the classes?

Link to post
Share on other sites

My basic class was 110 hours of classroom / lab. 10 hours of ER time. 10 hours of FD ride along. I passed the NREMT-B test the first time, so I'm one of the ones who did the 110 hour and passed. Now then, that 110 hours doesn't count the time I spent studying outside of the classroom, that was probably another 100 hours. Also, I learned that the EMT-B teaches you the bare minimum and you really don't know crap about crap. :)

Which brings me to... I'm looking at starting paramedic school in January. That's a ways off yet, but I've been banking the money I'm making working part-time with the ambulance company to pay for it, and that's the next time the Cleveland Clinic EMS Academy is offering their night program. I'll most likely leave my part-time job for the year I'm in paramedic school. Somehow, I doubt I'm going to have the time to work my full-time job, continue taking 12 credit hours towards my BS, attend paramedic school and the required clinicals AND work 2-3 nights a week running squad.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've seen numerous references to NREMT-B certification being a 120 hour class. How often does someone pass the NREMT-B written and practical tests with just those 120 hours. I passed the state NREMT-B practicals in March and the NREMT-B CBT in April - here's my hours spent pursuing it:

EMT-Basic class time - 120 hours

Study time in conjunction with class (book learning) - 120 hours

Emergency Department Clinicals - 50 hours

BLS / ALS Ambulance ride alongs - 40 hours

Practicals / NREMT-B CBT preparation - 50 hours

I did sign up for extra clinical and ride along shifts - the bare minimum was 5 patient contacts, which seemed way too light.

I probably estimated low on book learning and test prep times, which does not include time on EMTCity, etc. :lol:

Having said this, I have no illusions that this training comes close to NREMT-P training time commitments or skill sets, but I do wonder if people actually get NREMT-B certified and State licensed with just 120 hours of class time.

Feel free to detail your hours spent for whichever NREMT certification you wish.

Well you kind of answered your own question. The 120 hours is likely the minimum required by your state. They never factor in study time or prep time as it varies with the individual. You also increased the amount of clinicals and ride alongs. Like many professions a lot is learned on the job. A police officer is not proficient right out of the academy. They learn the basics in the academy and the "real" police work in the field just like a new EMT. You get the base line training in school and NR and many states have determined that 120hrs is enough base info for that skill set. This could be argued back and forth but just remember that the hours of actual experience in the field far outweighs classroom time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

The state of Arizona requires 110 hours minimum for an EMT-B class. This does not include clinical time (I believe it's 8-16 hours in the ED). Arizona has no requirement for ambulance ride time for a basic class.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My very first basic class was 110 hours and 5 calls. Maryland did not, and still does not recognize national registry at any level except paramedic. I did opt to take the registry exam in another state, and I passed with flying colors, the first time. I admit, I didn't study much, but honestly, the information was simple, and I was busy studying for my real college classes. It wasn't, and still isn't rocket science. It's glorified first aid. If it doesn't breath, breath for it. If it doesn't beat, beat for it. If it's bleeding, make it stop. And never, ever, ever talk on your cell phone while you're driving my patient and I to the ER. It can't get any easier.

Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...