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maine_emt

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  • Location
    Lewiston, ME

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  • Occupation
    College Student, EMT-Basic
  1. Zoll RescueNet ePCR is now offering an iPad app http://www.zolldata.com/RescueNet-epcr-ipad-app/
  2. Excellent choice with the Horton rigs. My company is all Horton with Ford E450 diesel chassis, we have 16 ambulances in total. Our last four ambulances have had a special safety configuration that replaces the bench seat with a forward facing captain's chair with a three point harness and is also setup with a LP12 mount with drawers below. The concept is the for 90% of the calls we do can be done with the provider sitting in the forward facing seat, hopefully with the seatbelt on. Again congrats on a great ambulance. We have had great success with the multiplex system, especially in the summer and winter where you can get the A/C or heat going on the way to the call.
  3. My company uses Zoll RescueNet Nomad in our trucks which shows us a map with our current position and our destination. Our current software cannot give turn by turn directions. For directions we have map books that are turn by turn directions to all of the streets in our response area. Most employees carry a GPS with them, I personally don't get mine out unless I go on an out of town transfer, and usually its not for the directions but rather the traffic information and just keeping track of how much more time to the destination. We are supposedly getting the upgraded MDT from Zoll that does give the user turn by turn directions, not holding my breath for it though.
  4. I have had the pleasure of using Image Trend's online bridge at two of the volunteer services I worked for. My full time gig uses the Zoll RescueNet Suite of programs then is required by the State of Maine to upload all of the data to the state system from Image Trend. Image Trend recently introduced a dynamic version of their online bridge, which I have used a few times and is much better than their previous online version. It uses Microsoft Silverlight to dynamically change the fields you need based on what you put into run, so for instance if you put the call in as a pt refused transport, it will remove the field for destination hospital. The dynamic system is a great improvement on the old system, but still leaves a lot to be desired when compared to Zoll RescueNet ePCR with a ToughBook 19. For a small agency the state bridge program through Image Trend is helpful in that it has a frequent patient database that remembers not only demographics but also patient's past medical history, medications, allergies, and physician. It also can be used from any computer with the internet. The QA/QI section is also easy to use and in Maine is free for all services, however all services must use electronic patient care reports and if they do not sue the state system they must upload the data to the state system. I am a huge fan of Image Trend, no, but its better than nothing.
  5. Yes according to the OP the ALS provider failed his duty to act, but it seems there is a systematic problem as well. Not automatically dispatching a paramedic to a chest pain call in concerning as it is, let alone later dispatching them with a cell phone. I think the service's policies should be looked at as well as disciplinary actions for the medic.
  6. The service I work for has 16 ambulances with a mix of Ferno 35-A and ProFlex cots all equipped with Fernotracs. The majority of employees including myself prefer the older 35-A stretchers as they are lighter and have been fitted with and E tank, which makes for less frequent tank changes. The company does have one power ferno cot, but is frequently out of service and has only been used a few times.
  7. The company I work for dispatches calls with a tiered response based on the symptoms reported by the caller. About half the calls we respond to with no lights and sirens and only when the patient's life is in danger will we risk running lights and sirens to a scene. When running lights and siren the company policy is when approaching any intersection to slow down to a speed one can quickly stop if needed. We also rarely use lights and sirens when transporting to the hospital. Recently my company has installed computers in the front of each truck with GPS and dispatches on them, the computers are extremely helpful and have reduced our radio traffic, but also have a system that beeps when we are at 73 mph and sends our Operations Director an email when the truck reaches 75 mph. We frequently do out of town transfers from 30-150 miles away and many providers like to push the speed limit and most find the speed limits annoying at best. Just my two cents.
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