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K9kazoo

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  1. Looking for information based on European EMS... Need to know what standards, guidelines, acts, etc... that are/were used to come up with the current duty uniform. Looking for specifics on why certain colors were chosen, types of materials, etc... Example in Canada some departments may use NFPA 1999, CAN/CSA-Z96-02- High Visibility Safety Apparel, etc... Would appreciate links to PDF/Word docs... websites, etc... Thanks in advance. Bryan
  2. Thanks for the replies... lots of info to add to the pubmed searches and google Keep'em coming! B.
  3. I’m looking for some data for a research paper I’m doing for my Advanced Care Paramedic course. I’m looking for protocols, operating procedures/guidelines, etc... on OC/pepper spray calls for service. We’ve seen a huge spike with the gang bangers in our fine city using pepper spray against innocents and even law enforcement officers. Looking to find a better way of dealing with these patients. Would prefer not to transport as we have a problem with off load delays and a lack of resource issue here too. Any help you can send my way it would be appreciated. Would prefer links, Word or PDF documents. Please feel free to forward my request to those you think may be able to assist. Thanks, Bryan
  4. Does anyone use the new Zoll E Series out there? Here in Winnipeg we're having concerns about the weight of the monitors... hard case, metal mounting bracket, and the monitor comes in at a whopping 29.5 lbs. Using Crestline Fleetmax units... combined with this monitor we're having a lot of ergonomic issues... already having Worker's Comp claims... and it's only been a week! Is anyone else there having similar experiences? Solutions? Thanks, B.
  5. We're finding with our new 2007 Chevy unit (manufactured by Crestline that the cabin seems tight... when seated it seems the door is riding right up against you... meaning if T-bone there is a serious risk for intrusion. The Ford chassis seemed to have some play... of several inches. Also the seats in the cabin seem to be off set from the rest of the vehicle... the Medic is looking out the top left of the windshield not the center of it. The pedals seem to off set as well... The rear end is higher making it difficult to load the stretcher. These concerns have come to the attention of the Health & Safety committee... they've come from several people off several shifts... and finally... how is the mechanical reliability... how do they stand up against the Fords? Looking to network with other services to discuss the pros and cons of this Chevy chassis... our next H&S meeting is mid-June. Thanks... B. [web:1a9af762f4]http://www.crestlinecoach.com/ambulance_display.php?name=FleetMax[/web:1a9af762f4]
  6. STEINBACH ATTEMPTED MURDER / SUICIDE Steinbach, MB January 2, 2008 On January 1, 2008, at approximately 6:45 p.m. Steinbach RCMP responded to a complaint that a 20 year old male had been shot at a residence in Steinbach, Manitoba. While Police and Emergency Medical personnel where in the residence responding to the initial complaint, a second male subject (21 years of age), who was also present in the residence, obtained a firearm and fatally shot himself. The initial shooting victim was transported to the Steinbach Bethesda Hospital and subsequently Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. The victim is listed in critical but stable condition. Both subjects are residents of Steinbach, Manitoba. The RCMP Major Crime Unit along with Steinbach RCMP Detachment continue to investigate this incident. No further information will be released at this time. Contact person: Cpl. Brian Edmonds (204) 983-8497
  7. Not enough ambulances on road: paramedics Updated at 6:33 PM By Bartley Kives Winnipeg's paramedic union claims the city doesn't have enough ambulances on the road to respond to an emergency on the scale of the St. Clements balloon crash, never mind a major crisis such as the Minneapolis bridge disaster. High call volumes and a shortage of available ambulances have crippled the city's ability to respond to serious crises, claims the Professional Paramedic Association of Winnipeg, much to the surprise of both the Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service and politicians at City Hall. "Every paramedic fears the day something serious happens in Winnipeg, as we are short-staffed and under-resourced," said PPAW vice-president Marc Savard. "This city has clearly been lucky. I hate to say it, but sooner or later we're going to have a situation we can't handle." Savard said several times a day, there may be as few as one or two ambulances available to respond to medical emergencies out of a total complement of 13 to 21. First responders staffed by firefighters are doing an admirable job of treating patients at the scene and taking care of intoxicated people, but only ambulances can transport patients -- and there frequently are not enough available to handle multiple injuries, he said. Saturday's balloon crash in the RM of St. Clements, which saw 12 people suffer a variety of injuries, would have overwhelmed the city, he claimed, adding a Minneapolis-style bridge collapse would have been devastating. At a time when the Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service is still basking in the glow of a labour deal between once-squabbling firefighter and paramedic unions, Savard's comments have startled both WFPS managers and elected officials. "I would never say there will never be (an event) that would overwhelm our resources, but we have plans in place for emergency situations," said deputy chief Ken Sim, who's in charge of operations. "I'm quite confident we are more than capable of handling a situation and I'm struggling to understand why they (the union) are making these statements." Winnipeg can easily increase the number of vehicles available to respond to crises by freeing ambulances up from hospital duty, and in the event of even more serious crises, the city can call in ambulances from neighbouring municipalities or even ask the military for help -- as Minneapolis did last week, Sim said. Winnipeg also conducts simulation exercises to prepare for emergencies ranging in severity from routine pile-ups to terrorist attacks, Sim added. The city has two Multi-Incident Response Vehicles (MIRVs) capable of treating three to five patients each, and is expecting the delivery of a new 10-patient MIRV bus sometime in the fall, he added. "We're more than capable of handling emergencies. In fact, we've demonstrated it more than a few times over the years," he said, referring to incidents such as the 2005 Fort Richmond train derailment, the 2000 Assiniboine Forest plane crash and the 1998 school-bus crash on McGillivray Boulevard. "Our day-to-day issues are far more complex than saying we only have three ambulances and don't have enough resources to handle an emergency." The WFPS is about to boost its day-to-day ambulance service by adding another vehicle overnight with the help of $3.8 million in new provincial funding. Recruitment for new paramedics will begin in September and the ambulance should be on the road by November, Sim said. PPAW should be pleased with the injection of additional dollars and the political consensus about the need to beef up ambulance service even more, said St. Vital Coun. Gord Steeves, who chairs the council subcommittee in charge of emergency services. "There are shortages, but doesn't everyone acknowledge we're moving in the right direction?" asked Steeves, suggesting the union may be engaging in hyperbole about emergency preparedness as a means of getting out in front of 2008 budget discussions. "It's the union's job to bring up frailties in the system," he said. "But I am surprised by their tone, given the recent spirit of co-operation. It seems like we've regressed from where I thought we were right now." PPAW vice-president Savard, however, said he's not just concerned about staffing. "We're a union, but we're also patient advocates. We wear two hats," he said. "If people say we're scaremongering and trying to gain more resources, well that's their right. But do we need more resources? Yes." ■ bartley.kives@freepress.mb.ca
  8. EMS may hold vote on strike By SHAWN LOGAN, SUN MEDIA Calgary's 400 paramedics appear to be headed towards a strike vote after union members voted yesterday whether to take job action in their labour dispute with the city. Bruce Robb, president of Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 3421, was keeping the results of the membership vote on two questions close to the vest, but confirmed one question posed to members was whether to hold a strike vote. "We had a large turnout of members and received a very strong mandate," Robb said. Sources tell the Sun the paramedics' union is seeking a 30% pay hike over three years, while the city is offering the same 12% raise given to the transit union. Robb disputed the 30% figure, noting that number includes some pay grid adjustments the union believes was unfairly thrust upon it in 2000 by a provincially appointed disputes inquiry board to head off a potential strike. Mayor Dave Bronconnier said he is hoping the union will return to the table but noted the city can't possibly meet the wage demands being sought by paramedics. Robb said some 80% of the membership voted on whether to hold a strike vote as well as whether the union would take "other action." Robb wouldn't say if that entailed launching a work-to-rule campaign, preferring to wait until a press conference today to release vote results as well as the union's next steps. Paramedics last took strike action for 11 days in 1991. City spokeswoman Vickie Megrath said it has contingency plans, but it's too early to rule out a settlement prior to a strike vote.
  9. Cops to join decal display By JOE WARMINGTON Toronto Police officers are standing with their firefighting and paramedic cousins and will also soon display Support our Troops decals, too. In a symbolic move, Toronto Police Association (TPA) president Dave Wilson placed the first yellow magnetic ribbon on a squad car in 33 Division last night. The troops will appreciate it, says Master Cpl. Jody Mitic, a Brampton native who is home from Afghanistan on medical leave after losing both legs from stepping on a landmine in January. "It means a lot to us," Mitic said. The TPA and Toronto Police will eventually design their own decal but the ribbon Wilson used is one of the 500 the Toronto Sun purchased to hand out at our building today. "We are pleased with the mayor and council's decision to extend the support decals not only past the one year but now to allow police cars as well," said Wilson, a veteran cop who is in his second term as president of the close to 8,000-member association. His gesture of putting the decal on the car sends a message they want it to happen sooner than later. "This is a perfect opportunity for the association, the service and the board to all work together to boost morale of our fine troops." The TPA understands there is still some protocol to be followed but Wilson said he will work with Chief Bill Blair and the political masters to ensure it happens soon. "The association's board met yesterday and we have agreed we will pay for all the cost," he said. "It will be a great honour to do so." It's something most agree is long overdue. The problem has been the political procedure put in place that did not allow police to display any ribbon or support decal. In fact, prior to Wednesday there was a decision to have all of the decals removed this September from all city owned emergency vehicles -- saying it was only supposed to be a one-year support period and did not meet "certain corporate standards." The public was outraged and pressured council to change its tune. Publicly, police brass said they would wait until they were delivered the council's motion before moving ahead with the support ribbons but privately they are thrilled. The association made the first move last night. "I know the vast majority of all the service, from senior command to civilian members, are 100% behind our brave men and women in the military," said Wilson. "There will always be a special bond between those who serve and protect, and these decals send the troops and their families the message from us that they are not alone." You can congratulate him yourself at the Sun building today. Wilson will be one of many coming to a special mini-Red Friday rally we are going to have in the Toronto Sun lobby at 333 King St. E. at 1 p.m. where there will be a moment of silence to honour our war dead. You will also get a chance to meet Jody Mitic, who was told he would never walk again. You will see for yourself, they were wrong. His titanium legs are so good, he's able to drive around in his pickup truck -- now filled with support ribbons. Come meet Julie Brown, too. The Cookstown resident is just back from working at the Tim Hortons in Kandahar. You will read more about her in my Monday column. No matter what happened this week Toronto is unequivocally behind our troops. And the Police Association boss wanted to send that message loud and clear last night.
  10. Cops to join decal display 'It means a lot to us,' wounded vet says By JOE WARMINGTON Toronto Police Association boss Dave Wilson places a yellow magnetic "Support Our Troops" ribbon on a cop car yesterday. The Sun is handing out 500 of the decals at our building, 333 King St. E., today. (Veronica Henri, Sun Media) Toronto Police officers are standing with their firefighting and paramedic cousins and will also soon display Support our Troops decals, too. In a symbolic move, Toronto Police Association (TPA) president Dave Wilson placed the first yellow magnetic ribbon on a squad car in 33 Division last night. The troops will appreciate it, says Master Cpl. Jody Mitic, a Brampton native who is home from Afghanistan on medical leave after losing both legs from stepping on a landmine in January. "It means a lot to us," Mitic said. The TPA and Toronto Police will eventually design their own decal but the ribbon Wilson used is one of the 500 the Toronto Sun purchased to hand out at our building today. "We are pleased with the mayor and council's decision to extend the support decals not only past the one year but now to allow police cars as well," said Wilson, a veteran cop who is in his second term as president of the close to 8,000-member association. His gesture of putting the decal on the car sends a message they want it to happen sooner than later. "This is a perfect opportunity for the association, the service and the board to all work together to boost morale of our fine troops." The TPA understands there is still some protocol to be followed but Wilson said he will work with Chief Bill Blair and the political masters to ensure it happens soon. "The association's board met yesterday and we have agreed we will pay for all the cost," he said. "It will be a great honour to do so." It's something most agree is long overdue. The problem has been the political procedure put in place that did not allow police to display any ribbon or support decal. In fact, prior to Wednesday there was a decision to have all of the decals removed this September from all city owned emergency vehicles -- saying it was only supposed to be a one-year support period and did not meet "certain corporate standards." The public was outraged and pressured council to change its tune. Publicly, police brass said they would wait until they were delivered the council's motion before moving ahead with the support ribbons but privately they are thrilled. The association made the first move last night. "I know the vast majority of all the service, from senior command to civilian members, are 100% behind our brave men and women in the military," said Wilson. "There will always be a special bond between those who serve and protect, and these decals send the troops and their families the message from us that they are not alone." You can congratulate him yourself at the Sun building today. Wilson will be one of many coming to a special mini-Red Friday rally we are going to have in the Toronto Sun lobby at 333 King St. E. at 1 p.m. where there will be a moment of silence to honour our war dead. You will also get a chance to meet Jody Mitic, who was told he would never walk again. You will see for yourself, they were wrong. His titanium legs are so good, he's able to drive around in his pickup truck -- now filled with support ribbons. Come meet Julie Brown, too. The Cookstown resident is just back from working at the Tim Hortons in Kandahar. You will read more about her in my Monday column. No matter what happened this week Toronto is unequivocally behind our troops. And the Police Association boss wanted to send that message loud and clear last night. SUN RALLY The first 500 people who come down to the Toronto Sun building at 333 King St. E. between 1 and 2 p.m. today will receive a yellow ribbon for free. The military will also be on hand with a banner for people to sign to send over to the troops in Afghanistan. Military wrist bands and dog tags will also be handed out. A moment of silence will be held to honour our war dead.
  11. Link to video: http://calgary.ctv.ca/servlet/RTGAMArticle.../calgary.ctv.ca Unsure how long the link will remain active. Looks like it's a Demers... On a side note Calgary purchased 51 of the new Demers MX-170s. B.
  12. Calgary EMS responds to a big problem DAWN WALTON From Thursday's Globe and Mail June 21, 2007 at 5:09 AM EDT CALGARY — In an effort to reduce both back-breaking work for paramedics and the humiliation of patients, a new ambulance specifically designed to accommodate people who weigh up to 1,000 pounds is about to hit the road in Calgary. The city's new "bariatric response team" to be announced today includes specially trained paramedics, an air-bag system to help move obese patients onto stretchers larger than standard size and a hydraulic lift system to slide patients into the ambulance. Calgary's Emergency Medical Services calls it a Canadian first. David Lau, president of Obesity Canada, says it's a much-needed sign of the times. "This is a good step forward. I do have a number of patients who are 500 pounds and up and they normally cannot be transferred anywhere," said Dr. Lau, an endocrinologist who is also a professor of medicine at the University of Calgary. "It may sound trivial and yet it's not. It's a big [problem], to pardon the pun." Both experts and statistics have been pointing to a growing obesity epidemic in Canada and other developed countries. A study last year in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that the number of morbidly obese people in Canada has quadrupled since 1985, while the number of obese Canadians has doubled and those deemed to be overweight has increased 20 per cent. According to Statistics Canada, close to 39 per cent of adult Canadians were of normal weight in 2005. Almost 35 per cent of adults were overweight and more than 24 per cent were considered obese. More than 14 million adults in this country were either overweight or obese. Obesity comes with a social stigma and a host of problems including diabetes, heart disease and, not surprisingly, trips to the hospital. "With an increasing size of our population, there's increased danger to paramedics with lifting and moving these patients," said Paul Lapointe, the public education officer with EMS in Calgary. But it has also been difficult for heavy patients. "It's been an uncomfortable ride on the stretcher that we have and even getting them onto that stretcher is tough," Mr. Lapointe said. Calgary's new ambulance has been in the works for about a year. The remote lift system automatically raises the patients on a stretcher (which has been widened 15 centimetres, to 60 cm) and into the ambulance. The system was designed by a California company and costs about $30,000. According to Calgary EMS, this is the most advanced system for treating larger patients in the country, if not the continent. "In some places, some patients have been put on a flatbed truck," Mr. Lapointe said. "It's a pretty hard way for them to keep their dignity." In 1998, dramatic photos were snapped of rescue workers in Massachusetts using rock-climbing equipment, an aerial platform and a moving van to transport a man weighing 855 pounds (388 kilograms) to hospital. In March, Florida news media reported a three-hour ordeal involving 11 paramedics, the use of plywood, two stretchers and removal of a window to get a 500-pound man from his home to the hospital. As a result of seeing more and more heavy patients, paramedics have improvised to cope with the issue. In 2005, the paramedic service in Ottawa refitted an ambulance to include a standard stretcher that is 60 cm wide and can carry 298 pounds (135 kilograms) to one that is 91 cm across and holds up to 644 pounds (292 kilograms). It also added electronic winch apparatus to hoist patients in the ambulance. Montreal paramedics have also added a winch and ramp system to their ambulances. "Some of my heavier patients are in the neighbourhood of 700 and 800 pounds," Dr. Lau said. "By the time you hit 1,000 pounds you may even have trouble getting the person out of the house because the doors are just not wide enough." Even once obese patients get to medical centres, providing treatment for them poses another set of challenges. CT scanners and magnetic resonance imaging machines cannot accommodate people who weigh more than 350 pounds (159 kilograms). "You can tell things have come a long away," Dr. Lau said. "It's important to let people know that overweight people are no longer second-class citizens and we have to accommodate to their needs." ***** Canadians weigh in According to Statistics Canada, nearly a quarter of Canadians qualify as obese, based on body mass index (BMI). The figures below are from Statscan's 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey. They include Canadians 18 years and over, but do not include pregnant women. They also exclude people less than three feet tall and greater than six feet 11 inches tall. Total population measured 24.2 million Underweight (BMI under 18.5) 0.42 million Normal weight (BMI 18.5 to 24.99) 9.42 million Overweight (BMI 25.0 to 29.99) 8.46 million Obese (BMI 30.0 or higher) 5.90 million Obese subdivided into: Class 1 (BMI 30.0 to 34.99; high health risk) 4.21 million Class 2 (BMI 35.0 to 39.99; very high health risk) 1.17 million Class 3 (BMI 40.0 or higher; extremely high health risk) 0.52 million To calculate your BMI Divide your body weight (in kilograms) by your height (in metres) squared. For example, a person about six feet tall (about 1.8 metres) weighing 200 pounds (about 90 kilograms) would have a BMI of (90/3.24) or 27.78. Source: Statistics Canada
  13. More Calgary woes... http://www.emtcity.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=115415#115415
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