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  1. Drako is a big scary dog. He is a pit bull / rottweiler mix and he is big and strong and scary looking. He came into my life about 7 or 8 years ago when he was rescued, with another smaller pit, from an abusive situation. He was going to live with my daughter and her family. I happened to be in town when he arrived. I spent a few hours with the dog in my daughter's house and put my foot down. I explained that he was going to hurt someone in that family. Her chaotic, dynamic family was not the right place for Drakeo. We immediately thought of my brother. He lived alone in an A frame that he had built with a chainsaw and timber he had hewn from his own land. He lived in the country, very isolated in a remote part of Northern Ontario and had just lost his guard dog. I called him about Drako, and my brother came to see him. I didn't know it then, but it was the last time I would see my brother alive. I live in Arizona and our contact was sporadic. Long story short, my brother took Drako home with him and over the next 3 years, turned him into an excellent, loving dog. With a combination of discipline and dogmanship, my brother rehabilitated Drako. Drako was there when my brother shot himself. Drako almost got himself shot by the police. He was so protective of my brother's body. Eventually, a friend was able to persuade Drako to leave his best friend. Another long story short, Drako arrived here in Wisconsin to live with me a week and a half ago. I had spent time with him during my sojourns into Canada, when he was living with my daughter, where he had gone immediately after my brother's death. We are old friends. The most striking feature of my brother's face were his huge, expressive brown eyes. I see them in my mind's eye, looking at the world when he was a little boy, and when he was a broken man. Drako has the same eyes. It breaks my heart.
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  2. Someone asked me what an Empath was and to describe my ability as one... This is it in a nutshell kids... Enjoy Tammy Lin About Empathy and Empaths Empathy is the ability to read and understand people and be in-tune with or resonate with others, voluntarily or involuntarily of one's empath capacity. Empaths have the ability to scan another's psyche for thoughts and feelings or for past, present, and future life occurrences. Many empaths are unaware of how this actually works, and have long accepted that they were sensitive to others. Empaths Sense Deep Emotions Empathy is a feeling of another's true emotions to a point where an empath can relate to that person by sensing true feelings that run deeper than those portrayed on the surface. People commonly put on a show of expression. This is a learned trait of hiding authentic expression in an increasingly demanding society. An empath can sense the truth behind the cover and will act compassionately to help that person express him/herself, thus making them feel at ease and not so desperately alone. Empaths experience empathy towards family, children, friends, close associates, complete strangers, pets, plants and inanimate objects. Empathy is not held by time or space. Thus, an empath can feel the emotions of people and things at a distance. Some are empathic towards animals (ie: The Horse Whisperer), to nature, to the planetary system, to mechanical devices or to buildings etc. Others will have a combination of the above. Empaths Have Deep Sense of Knowing Empaths are highly sensitive. This is the term commonly used in describing one's abilities (sensitivity) to another's emotions and feelings. Empaths have a deep sense of knowing that accompanies empathy and are often compassionate, considerate, and understanding of others. There are also varying levels of strength in empaths which may be related to the individualís awareness of self, understanding of the powers of empathy, and/or the acceptance or non-acceptance of empathy by those associated with them, including family and peers. Generally, those who are empathic grow up with these tendencies and do not learn about them until later in life. Empathy is Inherited Empathy is genetic, inherent in our DNA, and passed from generation to generation. It is studied both by traditional science and alternative healing practitioners. Empathy has both biological/genetic and spiritual aspects. Empaths often possess the ability to sense others on many different levels. From their position in observing what another is saying, feeling and thinking, they come to understand another. They can become very proficient at reading another personís body language and/or study intently the eye movements. While this in itself is not empathy, it is a side-shoot that comes from being observant of others. In a sense, empaths have a complete communication package. How Empathy Works While there is much we don't yet understand about how empathy works, we do have some information. Everything has an energetic vibration or frequency and an empath is able to sense these vibrations and recognize even the subtlest changes undetectable to the naked eye or the five senses. Words of expression hold an energetic pattern that originates from the speaker. They have a specific meaning particular to the speaker. Behind that expression is a power or force-field, better known as energy. For example, hate often brings about an intense feeling that immediately accompanies the word. The word hate becomes strengthened with the speaker's feeling. It is that person's feelings (energy) that are picked up by empaths, whether the words are spoken, thought or just felt without verbal or bodily expression. Empaths are often poets in motion. They are the born writers, singers, and artists with a high degree of creativity and imagination. They are known for many talents as their interests are varied, broad and continual, loving, loyal and humorous. They often have interests in many cultures and view them with a broad-minded perspective. They are mother, father, child, friend, nurse, caregiver, teacher, doctor, sales people... to psychic, clairvoyant, healer, etc. (That is not to say that any of these categories are all empaths.) The list is extensive and really unimportant. It is more important to notice that empaths are everywhere--in every culture and throughout the world. Empaths Are Good Listeners Empaths are often very affectionate in personality and expression, great listeners and counselors (and not just in the professional area). They will find themselves helping others and often putting their own needs aside to do so. In the same breath, they can be much the opposite. They may be quiet, withdrawn from the outside world, loners, depressed, neurotic, life's daydreamers, or even narcissistic. They are most often passionate towards nature and respect its bountiful beauty. One will often find empaths enjoying the outdoors, beaches, walking, etc. Empaths may find themselves continually drawn to nature as a form of release. It is the opportune place to recapture their senses and gain a sense of peace in the hectic lives they may live. The time to get away from it all and unwind with nature becomes essential to the empath. Animals are often dear to the heart of empaths, not as a power object, but as a natural love. It is not uncommon for empaths to have more than one pet in their homes. Traits of an Empath Empaths are often quiet and can take a while to handle a compliment for they're more inclined to point out another's positive attributes. They are highly expressive in all areas of emotional connection, and talk openly, and, at times, quite frankly in respect to themselves. They may have few problems talking about their feelings. However, they can be the exact opposite: reclusive and apparently unresponsive at the best of times. They may even appear ignorant. Some are very good at blocking out others and that's not always a bad thing, at least for the learning empath struggling with a barrage of emotions from others, as well as their own feelings. Empaths have a tendency to openly feel what is outside of them more so than what is inside of them. This can cause empaths to ignore their own needs. In general an empath is non-violent, non-aggressive and leans more towards being the peacemaker. Any area filled with disharmony creates an uncomfortable feeling in an empath. If they find themselves in the middle of a confrontation, they will endeavor to settle the situation as quickly as possible, if not avoid it all together. If any harsh words are expressed in defending themselves, they will likely resent their lack of self-control, and have a preference to peacefully resolve the problem quickly. Empaths are sensitive to TV, videos, movies, news and broadcasts. Violence or emotional dramas depicting shocking scenes of physical or emotional pain inflicted on adults, children or animals can bring an empath easily to tears. At times, they may feel physically ill or choke back the tears. Some empaths will struggle to comprehend any such cruelty, and will have grave difficulty in expressing themselves in the face of another's ignorance, closed-mindedness and obvious lack of compassion. They simply cannot justify the suffering they feel and see. People of all walks of life and animals are attracted to the warmth and genuine compassion of empaths. Regardless of whether others are aware of one being empathic, people are drawn to them as a metal object is to a magnet! They are like beacons of light. Even complete strangers find it easy to talk to empaths about the most personal things, and before they know it, they have poured out their hearts and souls without intending to do so consciously. It is as though on a sub-conscious level that person knows instinctively that empaths would listen with compassionate understanding. Here are the listeners of life. Empaths are often problem solvers, thinkers, and studiers of many things. As far as empaths are concerned, where a problem is, so too is the answer. They often will search until they find one--if only for peace of mind. Written by Christel Broederlow Copyright © 2002 Christel Broederlow Shortened Version from The Empath Report 101 Updated about a week ago · Comment ·LikeUnlike Write a comment...
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  3. Tonight my son graduated from the vocational school. He got a certificate from carpentry. He made it all the way up to two week before graduation and he failed out of the nursing program. This was hard on him and myself all these years I have told both my boys you can do anything you want in life if you fail you fail as long as you do your best that is all anyone can ask. I am so proud of him he has come into his own in many many ways. But he is like his mom he isnt going to let a set back stop him from his dream we go to the college on wednesday to enroll him in their nursing program so pray all goes well for him. His choice not mine. I have learned a lesson from him over the last two weeks, one is he is more of a man than i could have imagined, the high school he attends couldnt change anything on his schedule since he only has two weeks of school he had no morning class anymore i told him he could stay home and then check in. He did not do this he went every day to the LPN class as though he was still in class. He opted to keep going so he could finish out the those two weeks. I am so very proud of him. Me i wouldnt have went back but he is no quitter. Tomorrow night is his final graduation from high school my baby will be ready to go into this big cruel world and spread his wings. This is bitter sweet I would love to keep him with me forever but I know its time for him to come into his own. I do worry did I do good enough job raising him did I make the right choices while i was raising him alone? Did I teach him the things he will need out in this world? Did I forget to teach him something. Tonight as i watched him go across that stage I could never describe the feeling of how proud I was of him. Yes he failed LPN but he didnt let that destroy his dream. Maybe I need to take a lesson from my son.
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  4. Ya, I think Im gonna start using this blog again to tell my feelings and get them out there so it isnt all over facebook and have people in my business that dont need to be...
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  5. Hello EMS friends! I am the medic that invented the Turley Backboard Pad. I am now trying to get a grant to develope other complimentary products. I need 160 more votes in 12 days. Just go to www.missionsmallbusiness.com Hit Login & Support, then enter Turley Backboard Pad Co, state of WA, city of University Place, Search, then hit Vote. Thank you so much to all my peers that want to help me make a realy improvement in patient care. Thanks, Amy
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  6. You just never know what may happen... I am having a little medical problem and am trying to keep it quiet in my circle of family and friends but I am really struggling so I thought maybe my EMT City friends could offer some advice or words of encouragement. I have had a small growth on my thigh for about 5 years. I went to my PCP a few years ago and he said it was nothing, it had probably been there longer than I realized and i shouldn't worry about it. Well a month ago I took a spill from a horse and the area around my growth appeared to have a huge bruise around it but it didn't feel like a bruise. In one of my follow up appointments for the back injury I asked my PCP to look at it again. He became very concerned and scheduled me to come in the next day so he could remove it. No big deal, he cut it out, left a stitch to close the incision, sent it to pathology because he nor anyone in the office had ever seen anything like it before. The first pathologist called him and told him he thought it looked like a liposarcoma but he had never seen it before so he was sending it to a second pathologist. The second pathologist said it looked like a different even rarer form of sarcoma but when he stained the slide it didn't act like it should. His recommendation was to remove the rest of the groth with a large section of healthy tissue just to be cautious. I was sent to a general surgeon who told me he wouldn't touch it until he had approval of an oncologist. The oncologist wouldn't make a definitive diagnosis but thinks it is sarcoma. He ordered a CT of my chest, abdomen, and pelvis as that is where this particular cancer spreads. I had the CT today so I am just waiting for results. The oncologist said that the tumor in my thigh will need to be removed regardless and next week he and the surgeon will discuss how much needs to be removed. Does anyone have experience with liposarcoma or any other forms of sarcoma? Does it sound like I'm on the right track? Any suggestions for me? I am very worried and the more I google the worse it gets.
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  7. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYtww8EEOS0
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  8. With today being Christmas Eve, I am humbly beseeching the EMS Gods to be good for the next 40 hours. I want everyone to be safe and healthy for the holidays. I dont want to tell 80 yr old Grandma that her husband of 60 yrs has no pulse and that it is hopeless, all the while doing CPR and pushing drugs. I dont want to tell the father of 3, that the accident that his wife was in took the lives of her and thier 3 children. I dont want to tell the 3 yr old that Mommy isnt ok but I'll keep trying. I dont want to take any premature babies to higher level of care so that they can die an hour after I get them there. The next 40 hours are for celebrating the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ...not for mourning the death of a loved one. I dont want anyone to have to remember Christmas as the day they lost everything. So no fires either, please. Amen and thank you.
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  9. In my head, I understand the reasons why you did what you did. I have been there many times myself. Parts of me admire the fact that you had the guts to do it and then I get so sad that you felt that was the only option you had. Dammit! Why didn't you just pass out? I know you have a million times before. I wish you would have told me goodby. You told other people (in your own way) and you acted like you didn't even have a sister. I know we haven't really talked in years, but you were my twin brother. We were together in the womb. You have always been in my world. I don't understand why you waited till I got to town and then killed yourself without ever contacting me. Was it my fault because I didn't call you right away? I think it might be less painful to believe that I had something to do with your decision than to accept the fact that for you, I didn't even exist. Have you any idea of the wreckage you left behind? You think your life was a mess. Your death was way worse. I worry about our little brother. Yeah, he's 44 years old but he's the one that got to clean out your place. He's got the cap with the .22 hole in it. He dragged bags and bags of your shit out of your house. He's also paying off your credit card bills because he wants to keep that pile of crap you called a house and build a legacy. How about our 82 year old mother. You treated her like shit and yeah - you had your reasons, but I was the one holding her as she wailed by your coffin.. you heartless son of a bitch. I love you so much... and I am so mad at you. I already forgive you and I miss you
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  10. A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off by an artery in the brain that either ruptures or is blocked, cutting off critical oxygen supply to neurons. Approximately 80 percent of neurons die within three hours of the time that oxygen is cut off; therefore, rapid action is critical to prevent irreversible brain damage. Healthcare professionals working with adult patients have developed a catchphrase—“Time is brain”—recognizing that acute stroke recognition and treatment is of premier importance to preserve brain tissue, limit the amount of disability patients suffer in the long-term, and increase the stroke survival rate. In order to save time—and potentially brain function—in patients that have suffered a stroke, the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association have developed a community-oriented “Stroke Chain of Survival” that links specific actions to be taken by patients and family members with recommended actions by stroke prehospital care providers, emergency department (ED) personnel and in-hospital specialty services. The “Stroke Chain of Survival” is characterized by four sequential stages, including Rapid recognition and reaction to acute stroke warning signs; Rapid emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch; Rapid EMS system transport and prearrival notification to the receiving hospital; and Rapid diagnosis and treatment in the hospital. These four stages within the “Stroke Chain of Survival” include the execution of seven distinct steps in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment, also known as the Seven D’s. The seven steps also highlight the key points at which delays can occur, necessitating organized and efficient care at each step to avoid needless delays. The Seven D’s of stroke care, as well as the major actions to be performed in each step, are: Detection of the onset of signs and symptoms of acute stroke. Early recognition of hallmark signs and symptoms of acute stroke is critical to improved patient outcomes. Dispatch of EMS by telephoning 911 or another emergency response number. This communication activates EMS systems and ensures prompt EMS response. Delivery of patient to a medical facility. Patients should be transported to a stroke hospital or other facility capable of providing acute stroke care, and advanced prehospital notification should be given to the selected medical facility. Door of the emergency department (ED). Immediately upon arrival, the patient should undergo general and neurologic assessment in the ED. Data collection, including computer tomography (CT) scan and serial neurologic exams, along with reviews of patient file for potential fibrinolytics (tPA) exclusions. Decision regarding stroke treatment. If the patient remains a candidate for tPA therapy, review risks and benefits with patient and family and obtain informed consent for tPA therapy. Drug administration as appropriate, and post-administration monitoring. The window for administering treatment after a stroke is very limited. From the onset of stroke to the administration of treatment at a hospital or other medical facility, the Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommends that no more than three hours elapse to ensure improved patient outcomes and maximize the chance of stroke survival. "Time is brain" is more than a catchphrase—it is a call to arms in acute stroke care. Healthcare providers, hospitals and communities must rally to develop streamlined response systems to execute the Seven D’s of stroke survival and give stroke victims the best care possible, the best chance of survival and the best chance for resuming a normal life. For more information on stroke certification, stroke training, or acute stoke certification, visit Health Education Solutions’ overview of stroke courses offered online. Health Education Solutions additionally offers ACLS, PALS and BLS certification courses, as well as CPR and AED certification. The information included in this article is based on the 2005 guidelines for CPR, first aid and advanced cardiovascular care.
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  11. So I sure have had a lot of learning experiences so far as a Medic. I had a status epilepticus that had been seizing for 40 minutes, STEMI, MVCs, and the most memorable so far, running my first code as a medic. We were called actually for an intercept for report of a "person down". We make intercept and the EMTs are just hysterical. We literally have to make them stop yelling and shouting at the patient as they are doing CPR. Come to find out it was a fellow EMT. I actually did well at focusing on the task at hand, running the code. After butting heads with the other medic (He wanted to use new ACLS standards and I have not been taught them so I wanted to run the old ones), we made it to the hospital. We ran the code for a little bit longer before calling the time of death. That was when I got a really good look at the patient. It suddenly hit me that the patient was a co-worker. I am trying to be the one that maintains my composure at this point because the EMTs were really upset and the family was just devastated. So I get everything cleaned up and ready to go for the next call. Well once things calmed down I went and apologized to the EMTs for yelling at them (but they needed to calm down) and it kind of hit me that I worked with this person. They were healthy and no medical history. SO long story short I have been working my way through all that. I am not letting it bring me down though. We had the debriefing and I know that I did all that I could do. Still was a tough call to deal with. Other than that things are going well. I have officially been named "shit magnet". My co-workers just make me laugh. They enjoy picking on me and torturing me with this creepy plastic hand. Thats just part of working in this job though. You are going to get picked on....a lot!!! Well I suppose I better get some work done. I just wanted to let you all know that I am still alive and kicking. Things are going great and I am learning a lot!! I am starting to get more comfortable in my skills slowly. : Until next blog, Ash
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  12. I suppose I should just be happy to be alive and above ground. I never thought it would bother me... but one day you wake up and BAM! You're old My dear ole Grandaddy used to say, "One day you'll look at the obits and say wow... look at all those old people dying. Then one day you look at em' and think... Wow... look at all the young people dying. Never mind the fact that over the past few years gray hair began springing up. In fact, never mind that hair now grows in places that it shouldn't on an upright walking mammal. I didn't see it coming. So I walk in to a a local fast food dive. I place my order and frankly, it was bad. Double bacon cheese burgers with a side order of fries should be something I left behind long ago, but what can I say? Anyway, the girl behind the counter looked up at me and said, "Now we're money! We banging!" I honest to God had/have no idea what that means. Now when I was growing up in my formative years (1985-1995), "banging" had a context that I sadly never found appropriate on the counter of a fast food joint... Or any fine dining establishment for that matter. Yet here I am, in the middle of a half full restaurant, apparently "banging in the money" with someone still in highschool! I felt like Hank Hill at a rave. "Uhhh... that's nice. Could I please get my order and some ketchup"? Yes. It was at that point I realized it. I am officially old. There is an entire new world and language I don't understand. I hate to say it, but admitting it is the first step in the program... I have become my dad. Now I'm going to go lay in a fetal position and cry for awhile.
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  13. I was lucky to have a good EMT instructor when I took my EMT-B class. He was fantastic full man with years of experience and good morals. He’s a fair, wise, knowledgeable and an all around nice guy. Yet he had a UN canny knack of teaching us the little things a text book could not possibly print. One thing he told us was that you will get to know your partners on the truck better than your best friend or even your spouse. I work with a fantastic couple of partners at the Ambulance Service, I spend more time with them then I do with my girl friend it seems. In EMS you entrust your life to your partner for the good the bad and the crazy. People outside of EMS don’t understand this for the most part sadly. You have to work as a team to get the job done during a shift and when the crap hits the fan both of you have to be cool calm and collected. However some people are better to work with then others as life goes. You and your partner have to be in perfect communication and sink. If you’re not your heading for an accident or major risk to your life. My time in the Military thought me this well however a single EMT class does not prepare a lot of EMTs for this. One day I and my partner were doing a normal transfer and it all went wrong in the blink of an eye. I won’t go into details since I don’t want to name names or the specifics for legal reasons. The root cause of the problem was mistrust and lack of communication. Needless to say we had a major incident where my partner broke down in a very bad way that adversely affected the health and welfare of a patient and betrayed my trust. In an instant I found the training I received in my EMT class kick in like clockwork or a backup generator. Just like that I did a full head to toe trauma assessment and I was solely caring for this patient. The reason only I was caring for this patient was because I had to send my partner back to the truck to calm down and regroup since said partner was lost. In the end the patient was cared for and taken care of in a professional way. After the call and the mountain of paper work a something like this generates I sat down with my partner and talked about what went wrong. Sadly my partner was blaming the whole things on me and claimed outlandish things about me during the call to supervision. I maintained the truth and was 100 percent honest about what happened. This served me well with my co workers and supervisors in the after math and subsequent investigation. I never thought I would have a partner betray the fundamental trust we as EMS professionals have in each other. It’s a sad day when your partner who has more experience then you as an EMT lets you down in a major way. This bothered me in a major way for a long time after this call, my partner was openly joking about the call to people and was seemingly happy about what happened with made me even more UN happy. I am just glad I had the proper training and skill to provide outstanding patient care in times of extreme duress. I also learned a valuable lesson of how to properly communicate with my partner to make sure were 100 percent on the same page before, during and after any call. It’s so easy to rush and muddle though a call and just get it done but it does not always do good things for your patient. In the end my experience and EMT training served me well. It’s impressive during times of extreme duress when your training kicks in like a machine. For that I have my EMT instructor to thank many times over without you I would not be the fine EMT I am today.
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