Blogs

 

Three Reasons to Take Your PALS Course Online

Today, online learning options are available in nearly every field of study – and healthcare certification is no exception. Professionals looking to earn pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification or PALS recertification have the option of taking their PALS courses online. Before you decide whether or not you want to sign up for an online course, here are three important facts about online learning. 1. Online PALS courses allow you to work at your own pace. As a healthcare professional, you may not have the average 8 to 5 work day, making it difficult to fit a traditional class into your schedule. Taking a PALS course online means more flexibility to review materials on your own time and at your own pace. If you’re seeking initial certification, after finishing the online portion of the PALS course, you can schedule a time to validate your hands-on skills and complete a skills check at a local training center. 2. In an online course, you might learn more. A 2009 report (Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning) from the U.S. Department of Education showed that students who take an entire course or part of a course online, on average, display better performance levels than those who take the same course through traditional instruction. A review of key findings from more than 1,000 studies on online education published between 1996 and 2008 showed that not only have online courses become more popular over time, but they have also become an increasingly effective learning strategy. 3. Online education is a growing trend. The usage and legitimacy of online education in the healthcare field is on the rise. Continuing medical education, or CME, has increasingly moved online over the past few years. A recent study (“The Growth, Characteristics, and Future of Online CME,” Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, Winter 2010) estimates that approximately half of doctors will earn their CME through online learning by the year 2016. Taking your PALS course online now is a smart way to become familiar with the online learning approach. Learn more about Health Education Solutions’ online PALS certification.

CTCSG

CTCSG

 

It's fundraising time of the year

ok, so my son is in cubscouts. He wants the scholarship but the only way to meet his goal which the scholarship is 2500.00 in popcorn sales, is to hit up everyone of our friends, neighbors, relatives and whoever else he want's to sell to. I find that a pain in the butt because people seem to feel like they can't say no. I've said no enough but only because money is so tight. I put this here because I'm offereing online popcorn ordering but only if you agree to have an email sent to you with the popcorn sale link. If you want a popcorn item or want to purchase popcorn to support my son and his cub scout pack, please email me at ruffems@gmail.com I will send you a link to my son's popcorn ordering page and you can order online and have it shipped directly to you. No pressure. Just voluntary if you want to get some pretty dang good popcorn if I do say so myself. if you would consider purchasing popcorn to send to the troops overseas, you can choose the two Military popcorn options, 50.00 and 35.00 Both of these items gets popcorn in that amount sent to the military serving overseas as well as domestically. Thanks for listening and reading.

Just Plain Ruff

Just Plain Ruff

 

First O.R. rotation

Welcome back Dear Readers! If you've been following my travails through medic school, y'all know that I've recently begun my clinical rotations as a Paramedic student. Yesterday was my first rotation in the Operating Room. I was there to get experience in intubation. I've never been treated like a complete idiot before, and I'm not liking the feeling! The arrogance of some of the anesthesiologists and doctors was overwhelming, and I don't know how I overcame the urge to just slap the snot out of some of them!! I relize that they don't know me from Adam, and Emergency Medicine is a 'dog eat dog world', (hell, I've been part of the ass-chewing frenzy on more than one occasion).....but to be dismissed summarilly simply because I'm a student was something I didn't see coming down the tracks! I had 10 opportunities to try to intubate patients that were being operated on, but only got 2 actual attempts. So far, I haven't had one successful intubation. The first was denied simply because I couldn't get the mouth open far enough to fully insert the laryngoscope blade enough to even think about sweeping the tongue to the left (I kept bumping the end of the laryngoscope aginst the patient's chest) and the second was because I had what sounded like 14 people trying to tell me 47 different things all at the same time. I finally backed out of it because I was fearing that I was approaching the dreaded 30 second mark, and just bailed out of it because panic was setting in....hard... Of the other opportunities, the surgeries started early, so by the time I got to the theatre, the patient was either intubated, or there was a change in plans and they only used an LMA and the Nurse anesthetists had already done it. Add to that being told that "Doctor X doesn't allow students in his Operating Theatre"... I got to observe a few Nurse anesthetists dropping tubes like it was nothing more significant than poking a straw into a juice box. I even got to see the human version of what I saw while tubing the mannequins. Yeah, it was cool as hell, but it was also frustrating as hell because I was there to do it, and somehow, fate denied me the opportunity. My philosophy has always been "Learn one, do one, teach one"; unfortunately, this doesn't seem to be shared throughout the medical community. We've already had one student drop 7 endotracheal tubes on his first O.R. rotation (a feat I won't be able to beat), I don't know where I'm going wrong here! I've been told that I'm being 'too gentle' (isn't that part of what we do? You know, try not to aggrivate possible injuries/do no harm)? We're taught that to place the patient in the 'sniffing position' we use the head-tilt/chin-lift method. This is to protect the cervical spine and to open the airway. In the O/R, I watched the nurse anesthetists grab the patient on both sides of the head (about ear level) and move the head that way ...... thats NOT how we're taught to do things! Another BIG difference is that with a mannequin, the tongue isn't nearly as huge and floppy as it is in a paralyzed patient! I only need to accomplish 5 intubations, but at the rate I'm going, I'll be pulling extra shifts in order to reach this miniscule goal! I understand that there's a hesitancy when approaching a new task, but is it REALLY necessary to have an anesthetist scream at me while reminding me that succinylcholine and propofol wear off? I know they're not a 'permanent drug', otherwise there would be millions of people on life support because they'e had to unergo some form of surgery (myself included). Maybe I'm trying too hard, maybe I'm making this more complicated than it really is....I just want to succeed and be the best damn medic I can possibly be! All I can see at this point is that I've failed miserably, and THAT is unacceptable in my book! I'm not stupid by any means, but yesterday's venture into the Operating Rooms of the local hospital definately has me questioning my abilities and if I'm even qualified to be in medic school......

Lone Star

Lone Star

 

First day of school

Today is Jayses first day back to school. For the last 3 years, he has been in the 8-1-1 program at Parley Coburn, an inner city school. He was released back to his home school of Pine City for 5th grade. He has progressed so much in the last 3 years. He has met all of his goals academically and still working on social and communication goals. I am so proud of him. If someone had told me 3 yrs ago that he would do so well, I would have flat out called them a liar. I truly thought that he would be in the 8-1-1 program for as long as he could be. But he proved me wrong....and I am so happy he did. I had to laugh at him after I took him to his classroom. After I met his teacher and his Special Ed teacher, he put his backpack in his cubby, turned and looked at me and said " it's ok Mom, you can go now". 3 years ago, a new teacher, new classroom and new school threw him into a sensory overload. Today, it was as though he had been doing this all along and seemed to be just fine with it. I hope so, we've come too far to take a slide backward now. On another note, with 9/11 on the horizon, take some time to do a random act of kindness. "Pay it Forward" to 3 complete strangers and expect nothing in return. May your day be full of peace and blessings.

nypamedic43

nypamedic43

 

Life lately....

Hello my fellow EMS'ers, Things sure have been crazy for me. I am working my way through Paramedic orientation while finishing out my "basic" shifts. That pretty much means that I have no life what so ever. Thats ok though. I am actually learning a lot. Its made me open my eyes to a whole new world. I knew that once I passed medic classes and testing that the "real" learning was just beginning but I had no clue as to how! I kind of have had to have a slap in the face to wake me up. I think I am finally starting to get the hang of thinking like a medic and not like a basic. Yes, I know basic skills before medic but it was hard for me until recently to step up and play medic rather than hiding behind the medic. It was hard for me to get out of my thinking that way. Since then things have been going a lot better!!! I have one more orientation day next week then the week after I start taking over as medic. To be honest.....I am scared $hitle$$. Its intimidating. Well in other news, I am getting ready to go on vacation next month. I am going to Wyoming to see family and to meet my new nephew!! He will hopefully be born the first week of September. I am getting excited. I think it will be a fun trip. I am driving so it will be a long trip but thats ok. I am up to the challenge. Once I get back, I will start orienting on the other ambulance that I will be working on. I am excited for that but it will be strange not being the student on that rig. I also started my classes for my bachelors degree. I am doing a lot online so thats nice. I am actually really enjoying my classes so far. That could change by next quarter LOL. I am going for my Bachelors in Psychology. YES....I know.....I am crazy!! Well I think that is all that is new with me. Life is busy but boring non-the-less around here. I hope this finds all of you doing well out there in EMS land! Ash

MedicAsh

MedicAsh

 

This is unbelievable

I was talking with my daughter when she came home from college today. She was telling me that one of her friends knew the people that use to live across the street from us. Theynhad just moved away, about 3 months ago. She went on to tell me that the female claimed that she was forced to video with her phone, an 8 year old girl having sex with a 13 year old boy. That angered me, how does your boyfriend make you use your phone to video this? But then she went on. Her boyfriend was arrested for having video'd taped himself with his phone giving a 5 month old little boy oral sex. Yes a 5 month old. They both claimed that they were forced by each other. Your kidding me right? This enraged me. No words in the English language could explain how I felt when I heard that. I told my daughter that I am very glad they no longer live across the street from us. I don't think that I would be able to control myself is she got out of jail on bail. My daughter new her from high school and always would tell me stories about her. I would tell my daughter Theresa that was in high school people do change. I was right in a way she did change for the worse! What is wrong with this world? I read the blog hmmm and that so fit with this story. The moms being let off after killing their little ones, all with being pregnant before they are tried for the first little ome they killed. We are no longer held accountable for our actions. It is all everyone elses fault! I shudder to think that after watching all these other people getting off with time served after only 20 months for killing their children that she may never see a jail cell after she gets out on bail! We are failing as a society. Didn't mean to rant but this story my daughter told me is insane!

2wheelinemt

2wheelinemt

 

Reflections from Medic School

Greetings and salutations Dear Reader! Monday was the module finals for Airway Management in Paramedic School. I’ve somehow survived another opportunity for the school to involuntarily cull me from the herd. Class size has dropped from 16 students to a mere 10. Most students appear to be interested in either how fast they can get their Medic certifications (we lost one student to a local ‘patch mill’), or they’re pushing the boundaries of the attendance policy of the school and getting removed. A couple of the students just haven’t taken deadlines seriously. I’ve been sitting here thinking about how far I’ve come and how much I’ve apparently learned since classes started in March of 2011. Granted, I’ve still got about a year left on the course, I’ve been hit with a sobering thought. While my grades aren’t ‘off the chart’, they’re not scraping the bottom of the barrel either. With that said, they tell me that I’m doing well in the class and that I’m learning things, (which is the whole concept behind education…lol). The problem I’m facing is that despite being told that I’m actually learning and advancing my educational levels, and that I’m advancing as a provider; I don’t feel like I’m any smarter…. Sure, I can cram a tube down someone’s throat in the hopes of securing an airway; I’ve seen what vocal cords and the glottic opening should look like, and just how easy it is for an infant’s tongue to occlude their tiny airway. I can insert foreign objects into veins, the chest and even the throat. I can bury needles into bone and can inject substances that most people never get to touch, let alone decide who gets it or not. Having just completed pharmacology, I’ve got a huge stack of drug cards sitting on my desk, and they (the drugs) scare me. While there are antidotes and antagonists to counteract a bunch of them, the result of an ‘oops’ is still so very apparent. As I progress through the coursework, and am exposed to the ‘inside information’ that all medics are exposed to, it just leaves me simply AMAZED how field medics can keep all this straight in their heads! Yes, the field of paramedicine scares the living hell out of me! I’ve found that it’s so very easy to kill my patients with these new skills….and yet killing your patients is kind of contraindicated to living, not to mention illegal and contraindicated in personal freedom and ability to practice… I’m sure that I’m not the first Medic Student to feel this way, nor will I be the last; but there are days that I seriously feel like throwing my hands up in the air and walking away, simply because the responsibility that comes with the new ‘toys’ and skills is so overwhelming! I feel like I’m drowning in a sea of information, and have a tidal wave of even more hanging over my head waiting to smash me against the rocks of the beachhead of a new land called Paramedic.

Lone Star

Lone Star

 

things just sometimes don't go the way planned

Ok, this is a rant. Left Tallahassee florida today with what I thought was at least 400 dollars in the account. Drive to Ocala florida and stop to get something to eat and a bit of cash out of the ATM. The ATM kept disconnecting and I did get my food. I then made it about 50 miles down the road and found a small convenience story, Love's if anyone knows them. Tried to take out cash, said insufficient funds. Turns out the bank was 800+ overdrawn. Called the wife to have her check the account and it turns out Avis had put a hold on my account for my rental I was driving for 432.00 and they charged me again the same amount 3 minutes later. So I'm now having over 800 dollars being held by AVis. I was able to make it to Orlando with the gas I had, I then filled up (yes I was able to do that) and I got some food. I try to check into the hotel now in Orlando and they say the card was declined so I had to go set up a rewards stay to be able to stay here in the hotel. I called Avis, they said that they only charged me once. I said differently. They say nope they charged it only once. I now have to argue with Avis tomorrow morning to get the hold reversed. I'm tired, frustrated and mainly pissed. That is all. On a positive note, the night manager gave me a beer.

Just Plain Ruff

Just Plain Ruff

 

CPR HD

Has anyone heard of or been practicing the CPR HD protocol. I learned it today it was a really amazing efficient way to work a STEMI. The focus is to decrease prolonged interruptions of chest compressions. It's an organized plan where everybody knows exactly what they are supposed to be doing and gives the PT the best chance of recovering neurologically intact. The PT we used it on had missed a dialysis appt. and had a laundry list of other Rx's and we got him back. We took him to a destination currently practicing hypothermic treatment of ROSC PT's and he's doing really well. It was very smooth and worked great in the field.

EMTCOWGIRL

EMTCOWGIRL

 

New ACLS Guidelines Launched in 2011

When it comes to saving lives, efficiency is key. In order to make sure that protocols for life-saving procedures are up to date, the American Heart Association evaluates existing guidelines and examines available research every five years in order to determine whether changes need to be made. The most recent updates for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), pediatric advanced life support (PALS), basic life support (BLS) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were announced in late 2010. Updates for ACLS, online PALS certification and BLS certification have been added to Health Education Solutions courses. Michael Huckabee, PhD, PA-C, director of the Union College Physician Assistant program and curriculum developer for Health Education Solutions, explained the following important changes to ACLS guidelines: Changes in Chest Compression Guidelines When performing a life saving procedure that requires chest compressions, the compressions should depress the adult sternum at least 2 inches and complete recoil of the chest is required. Previously, guidelines only recommended 1 ½ to 2 inches. The recommendation for the rate of chest compressions has also been changed from about 100 per minute to at least 100 per minute. Additionally, ACLS guidelines now state that checking for a pulse on an unresponsive victim should take less than 10 seconds in order to avoid delaying chest compressions – it is more harmful to delay chest compressions on someone without a pulse than it is to mistakenly do chest compressions on someone with a pulse. A-B-C is now C-A-B Previously known as the A-B-C approach (Airway-Breathing-Circulation), ACLS guidelines now call for the C-A-B approach (Circulation-Airway-Breathing) when performing CPR as a single rescuer. Immediately initiating chest compressions helps maintain blood flow for individuals with life-threatening loss of heart function. When a team is performing CPR, management of respirations and circulations can happen simultaneously. New Medication Guidelines The updated guidelines include four new recommendations for medication protocol: 1. Adenosine is recommended for the treatment of stable, undifferentiated wide-complex tachycardia when the rhythm is regular and the QRS waveform is monomorphic. 2. Atropine is no longer recommended for routine use to manage asytole or pulseless electrical activity (PEA) due to a lack of therapeutic benefit. 3. Oxygen supplementation is no longer routinely indicated for uncomplicated acute coronary syndromes and should only be applied if the oxyhemoglobin saturation is less than or equal to 94 percent. 4. Intravenous chronotopic agents are recommended for individuals with symptomatic or unstable bradycardia as an alternative to external pacing. Recommendations for Quantitative Waveform Capnography Use of quantitative waveform capnography is recommended for confirmation and monitoring of endotracheal tube placement. The continuous measurement provides the partial pressure of exhaled carbon dioxide in mm Hg over time. Patients that require endotracheal intubation are at risk of tube displacement during transport and transfer. The continuous waveform capnography reflects any changes and provides a monitor of effective chest compressions. The return of spontaneous circulation, which is otherwise difficult to identify, is clearly shown on the capnography measure by a sudden increase in the CO2 readings. New Section for Post-Cardiac Arrest Care The new ACLS guidelines include a section for Post-Cardiac Arrest Care that emphasizes a structured system of care for a patient following a cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment and percutaneous coronary interventions should be provided when indicated after a cardiac arrest. Recommendations for Stroke Care Guidelines recommend stroke care through regional systems of care and organized stroke units, while prehospital treatment of blood pressure is de-emphasized. Additionally, while it is still recommended that thrombolytics (rTPA) are used within three hours of onset of stroke symptoms, the window of time can be extended to be within four and one-half hours after symptoms onset for selected patients. Priorities for Emergency Care Using advanced airways, gaining vascular access and administering drugs should not take priority over high quality CPR and access to immediate defibrillation. This recommendation is made in order to avoid interruptions to chest compressions or delays in use of defibrillators. Previous ACLS/PALS Certification Remains Valid Healthcare professionals trained under old ACLS guidelines are not required to immediately take a new course. The previous guidelines are still considered safe and effective, and individuals trained under earlier guidelines should continue to perform under the standards they learned until they are trained under the new protocols. ACLS/PALS certification will continue to be recognized as valid for a two-year period, regardless of procedural changes.

CTCSG

CTCSG

 

hmmm

It's been a long time since I've wanted to write in my blog. Work and life, I guess, have kind of prevented me from sitting down and putting my thoughts into words. Did my recert this year...holy crap that was a fast 3 years PALS and ACLS this fall...yeah the circle never stops. I still learn something from every call though, which is good. I have gotten more cynical though..not as gullible. Funny how that little voice your head gets stronger..I throw the BS flag quite often anymore. I was actually in the chat the other day. I know I know..its like going to church after years of not going, and no the roof didnt fall in on me lol It was good to talk to Scotty and Kate. I kind of miss the old gang, sitting in the chatroom and talking about anything and everything. Laughin and jokin with good friends ( at the time). Update on the court case with the baby boy. First trial ended in a hung jury, 11 guilty votes and 1 not guilty. The judge declared a mistrial and the day before I was to appear, yet again, the DA called me and said that she had taken a plea deal. She got 90 days after time served was taken into account. Win for the DA I guess...not so much for baby boy and she's about to have another one. There is no justice sometimes and unfortunately we get to see it firsthand. I try not to think about it too much, it will just make me mad and upset. When did children become disposable? Appendages that you can get rid of at any time and with the Casey Anthony trial and the one that I was involved with, there is no ramification for that action. They just pop out another one, that will live in poverty and live with abuse or worse...indifference. How have we, as a society, allowed this to happen. I just dont understand it. I think I am done rambling now...maybe I will feel like writing again soon. But, then again, maybe not.

nypamedic43

nypamedic43

 

Wow!

Wow, that is about all I can say at the moment. I never thought I would see this day!! I took my NREMT-P written exam today and I passed!!!! I honestly thought I was going to fail. I am still in shock. I have worked 3 long hard years to get through all of my college classes. I graduated in May and now look at me. I am proud of myself. I never thought I could do this. I have a job on the same service I am on now. I really need to start stepping up to the plate and getting more confident in myself. Thats the next step. Anyways I wanted to update you all Ash

MedicAsh

MedicAsh

 

Updates

Welcome back Dear Readers! I know it's been a while since your last glimpse into The Cluttered Mind of Lone Star, so I'll do my best to pull back the curtain, and catch y'all up on the latest developments... A bunch of y'all know that I'm currently in Paramedic Class. We recently finished up the first quarter of the year (we're still on the 'quarter system', but moving into the 'semester system' this fall). I was told by my instructor that I scored an 88% on the written test and that I'd finished up the quarter with a 4.0 GPA. When I checked my transcripts, I saw that I only finished up with a 3.25 GPA. Naturally, I'm going to be having a chat with the instructor! If this is in fact, my final grade for the quarter; it's blown my plans to graduate with honors, as I wasn't able to maintain a 3.5 or better throughout the program...(insert heavy sigh here). On to other things: Some of y'all know that I got wiped out in a motorcyle wreck back in November of 2009. I'm glad to say that I've finally gotten the whole insurance/legal mess worked out and reached a settlement with the insurance company. Wasn't exactly what I consider 'fair', but it's better than a swift kick in the 'nads.... First order of business was to re-establish 'primary transportation', which I did by getting into a 2000 Ford F150: I've also found a way to terrorize the nephew's kid: Check out the video here I also made arrangements to get into the Motorcycle Safety Foundations "Basic Rider's Course" to see if I still had the nerve to get back on a motorcycle. The reasoning for this is: 1. It's a 'closed environment', so I don't have to worry about getting run over right off the bat, and 2. It gives me a chance to go over the 'basics', that I was never taught when I started riding... I went through the class on 09 JUN 2011, and it was sponsored by one of the local Harley-Davidson dealerships. I went into the class not saying a thing about having ridden before, but after we got divided into two 'teams', I was 'outed' by a couple of my team mates, simply because they thought I "looked like a biker". Sunday, 12 JUN 2011 was the 'finals' of the course. I scored 100% on the written and a big fat ZERO on the range (range scores are a lot like golf scores, the lower the better you're doing)! At our 'graduation', we each got our course completion certificate, a 'pass' for the DMV (I don't have to do either the written test OR the road test) and a card that might get me a break on insurance. We were also given a 'fun certificate' based on our performance throughout the course. The instructors normally draw names and then try to assign a 'title', based on the students performance; but in our class, they decided to just sit back and watch us and then decide based on how we did. One got a 'Bad Braker' certificate, one woman got named 'Best Posture on a Motorcycle'...you see how this is going.... I ended up being voted "Most Likely To Accelerate", because I was constantly being told to slow down. The instructors told us that certan exercises had to be performed in second gear, and I just kept the speeds up in order to not lug the engine and beat it up unnecessarilly... The final outcome was that I not only had the nerve to get back on a motorcycle, I got my "M" endorsement and learned a few things along the way. This brings us to today... I got up early, intending to go to the DMV so that I could get the licensing all taken care of. I got out the trimmer to trim up the goatee and moustache, but failed to check the setting on the guide......you can already see where this is going, can't you Dear Reader? Yeah, somehow it got set to a lower setting than I normally use, and ended up trimming a LOT more than I intened to! I now look like a long haired 12 year old with grey whiskers..... This is the closest you'll ever see me without facial hair! I was planning on going out tonight, but I may decide against it simply because I don't want to have to deal with the whole "Are you old enough to be in here?" bullshit Until next time, Dear Readers...remember to smile....it makes people wonder what the hell you've been up to!

Lone Star

Lone Star

 

ACLS Study Guide: Three Tips for Success

If you’re preparing to certify or recertify in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification online, mastering a few simple study skills can bolster your chances of ACLS exam success. Health Education Solutions, the leading online provider of Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification, offers these tips to help you make the most out of your ACLS certification course and prepare for the ACLS exam. 1. Use mnemonic devices to remember key algorithms. In ACLS, algorithms are a simple set of procedures that help you solve a treatment problem. Mnemonic devices can help you remember the steps to saving a life. Here are a few examples from the ACLS course: • If a patient displays bradycardia (an unusually low heart rate) remember “Pacing Always Ends Danger:” TCP (transcutaneous pacing), atropine, epinephrine, dopamine. Just remember, these are options for treatment of various forms of bradycardia, and not an ordered list. Usually atropine and epinephrine are tried first, then depending on the situation dopamine may be used and pacing is last. If the situation is acutely life-threatening, sometimes temporary pacing is indicated. • If a patient experiences cardioversion (an unusually rapid heart rate) remember “Oh Say It Isn’t So:” O2 saturation monitor, suctioning equipment, IV line, intubation equipment, sedation and possibly analgesics. Mnemonic devices trigger faster recall, which is vital in emergency situations. The six H’s and five T’s are the most common mnemonic devices in ACLS – required learning for your ACLS exam. The six H’s • Hypovolemia • Hypoxia • Hydrogen ion – Acidosis • Hyper- or Hypokalemia • Hypoglycemia • Hypothermia The five T’s • Toxins • Tamponade – cardiac • Tension pneumothorax • Thrombosis – coronary or pulmonary • Trauma 2. Know your pharmaceuticals. When performing ACLS, intravenous (IV) drugs are sometimes needed, and it’s important to know which drugs are pertinent in which situations. • Adenosine: An anti-arrhythmia drug often used for stable supraventricular tachycardia. • Amiodarone: Used when a patient is in v-fib (when the heart does not empty and contractions are mild quivers that cannot sustain life) or v-tach (when the heart is pumping too fast). • Atropine: Treats bradycardia (low heart rate) by blocking the vagus nerve. • Epinephrine: Increases cardiac output by momentarily decreasing blood flow to the limbs, which increases the blood output from the heart. • Lidocaine: Used to treat a ventricular arrhythmia (irregular heart rate) often preventing the heart from providing oxygenated blood to the body. New ACLS guidelines also recommend procainamide here. • Magnesium Sulfate: An anti-arrhythmia drug used for torsades de pointes, a peculiar and rare ventricular arrhythmia. It is otherwise seldom used unless a person is low in magnesium, or in other non-cardiac clinical conditions. • Procainamide: An anti-arrhythmia drug used to counteract a variety of arrhythmias. • Vasopressin: Administered to increase cardiac output and improve circulation to vital organs. Health Education Solutions offers an ACLS Pharmacology Guide, available free to all ACLS students for use when preparing for the ACLS exam. 3. It all comes back to CPR. In 2010, guidelines for CPR transitioned the A-B-C (Airway-Breathing-Circulation) approach to a new C-A-B (Circulation-Airway-Breathing) approach. The emphasis is on quickly initiating chest compressions in individuals with life-threatening loss of heart function so that blood flow is maintained. It primarily applies to single rescuer CPR. In the hospital setting and with teams, management of circulation and respirations are achieved simultaneously. While memory aids and mnemonics are helpful when mastering ACLS material, the best preparation tool is confidence. It’s important to use course materials as an ACLS study guide to prepare effectively and thoroughly for the exam. 
 Health Education Solutions is the leading provider of online ACLS certification and recertification for healthcare professionals and first responders. ACLS and PALS courses, which now incorporate 2010 patient care recommendations, were developed in partnership with Union College. Read more about how the 2010 guidelines impact ACLS online training. For more information, click here: Your ACLS Study Guide

CTCSG

CTCSG

 

A Fool's Fail

Because of the pain killer I took Wednesday night, I slept pretty much all day Thurday. I didn't really start my day until around 3pm and even then I just didn't want to get out of bed. Now, it's after midnight and I can't sleep. My leg is killing me again and I don't have many of my good pain killers left. I wish I could just rip this muscle out of my thigh and be done with it. It's like sharp bolts striking in the one spot in waves that radiate down to my knee. I think now I know how Greg House felt like when he had the infarction in HIS leg...and the guy if fictional.

EvilEmpress

EvilEmpress

 

File 4 " Be Prepared Learn From Japan"

The sad events in Japan have had a personal impact on me over the last week. I lived in Japan for a long time while I was in the military. I became very accustomed to Japanese culture and way of life. Even after I left I returned to Japan many times and have a very personal and social stake in the well fare of Japan. When I heard the news about the earthquake, typhoon and subsequent nuclear plant problems it has me deeply concerned and nearly sent me into a state of depression. A very good friend of mine Jeff Quinlan and fellow blogger lives there I have known him for a very long time and naturally I was concerned. He writes for a Japanese Animation website and has a unique view about the Japanese people and culture. As soon as the disaster struck and he was safe he started to blog. Now since this is an EMS blog the events in Japan can serve as a vital refresher on what to do in case of a mass disaster or emergency and how we as EMS professionals can prepare for the unexpected. Day 1 Earth Quake strikes. "The shaking came out of nowhere. Usually we get a little buzzing feeling, maybe some rumbling off in the distance, before something worth concern bubbles up. Not this time. Almost instantly, my 3rd-floor apartment was shaking immensely. I was already sitting down in a safe area, so I had nothing to do but ride it out. Literally. The floors were bucking, the doors and windows were rattling loudly, light fixtures were swinging without restraint, and all my various knick-knacks and household items were finding their way to the floor. The shaking usually subsides after about 10-15 seconds, but this one just kept getting bigger and bigger!! I was beginning to panic, wondering if the building itself was going to hold up structurally. Haruhi-sama knows I had run out of things on my desk and shelves to watch fall. When the initial blow finally ended in what felt like 2 minutes later, I was able to finally stand and check things out. (ugh, even now this place is shaking like Hell's fury!! But at least I know aftershocks are never as bad as the Big Daddy.) My apartment was in a total shambles. My living room looked like a tornado came through (luckily nothing was actually broken), and my kitchen was no better. The refrigerator danced its way out from the wall probably about 20 inches, and the poor toaster oven that had been set atop was now on the floor…" In the world of EMS we are not taught very well how to deal with a once in a life time mass emergency such as natural disasters let alone a trio of them happening all at once. We are thought to call for additional resources the moment we think we need them. Sadly in a mass natural disaster they may not be available or even none existent. So often in EMS we are use to having things a certain way as most like a fine bottle of Gin. A natural disaster can mess that all up in a lot of unexpected ways. What if we don't have a hospital to go to or a large part of our needed resources are damaged or knocked out or even nonexistent. I know most governments and EMS organizations have disaster plans. But any plan is only as good as the people implementing it. In EMS we very rarely practice emergency preparedness and train for the worst case scenario. Emergency preparedness is very rarely talked about since it's something we don't think about. The most common kind of emergencies we get at my service is snow related and we have gotten use to that. But the events in Japan have me thinking how I can better prepare myself for the unexpected mass emergency or natural disaster. "Day Two, 24 hours later and supplies are running short. It's been a full 24 hours since the initial earthquake. It`s 7:22pm now as I'm writing this. My internet had been on long enough this morning to let friends and family know I was alive at that time, but as I'm learning now, Im far from out in the clear. The big concern right now are the two Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. A reactor at the First plant in Okuma-machi had exploded this afternoon at 3:36pm. I can't understand Japanese, so I'm just basing this on what I can piece together, but it looks like the immediate area within 10kms has upgraded to forced evacuation while the area within 20kms is now on recommended-evacuation. Apparently I'm in the 20km radius since my village was mentioned in the listing, though Japanese news totally fails and did not provide an actual map or, at least one with a scale and landmarks. A plain blue and green map with two red circles tells me NOTHING!!!! I got an offer from a friend in a nearby city to stay with her, but now my phone is out and I have no idea where she actually lives. Figures. Gas is out, too, meaning I have no hot water to bathe and no range to heat up food. Figures (again!!), I lucked out at the grocery store, being able to actually complete my shopping list despite the mad rush, but now I have no way to actually COOK the food I fought for. Ah well, at least my neighbor came by with some fried rice to get me through the evening. I'm counting on her to pound down my door should the radioactive poop hit the fan. I'm really glad now that I gassed up my car on Thursday night. Though the prices only went up slightly, the lines at every station I passed were ridiculous. Convenience stores were hit just as hard." In times of mass natural disaster I have found it takes a lot of personal preparedness both mental and physical. They say you never know how you are going to act in any given situation until it happens. While this is true a lot of the time this is where emergency prep and training can help. Mass disasters and emergencies have a way of bringing out the UN expected in people both good and bad. As EMS professionals we have to prepare for them and even overcome our own fears and doubts. "Day Three EVACUATED to Shirakawa! I've evacuated my village, per order of the government, pending what will happen with the three out-of-control reactors. One has already exploded, though it seems like the radiation leakage has been minimal. I had to drive over 2.5 hours through mountainside roads in the dark, fighting a maze of road closures. My friend was nice to let me stay with her and her family. Not sure how long I'll be here... don't want to take advantage of their hospitality, though at the same time, I may not have any choices if the evacuation order lasts into the new week." I feel no matter what you do in EMS you should have a personal emergency prep plan. This is a basic idea that goes back to the notions and skills I learned as a Boy Scout. The Boy Scott Motto is "Be Prepared" it's a simple concept but applies very well to EMS. As an EMT and serving in the military I have always known I have to prepare for the worst and hope for the best. I have three bags packed and ready to go in my home should a disaster strike. All of this will come in handy should I have to leave my home for an extended period or if there are disruptions in food, water or power should a disaster or emergency situation strike. I also have basic evacuations plans for myself and family with three designated evacuation places should I have to leave my home town. Emergency Prep Bags. 1-Food and Water Bag 8 Each MREs 12 Ramen Noodles 12 power bars 2 gallons of water 2-Medical Bag Deluxe Basic BLS bag with extra ice packs, trauma supplies, rope, crowbar, flashlight and hammer. 3-Clothing Bag Basic clothing for 4 days. Soap and wash supplies for 2 weeks along with a blue tarp, working gloves and extra shoes. After a disaster or when you're in a stressful and uncertain situation such as a military situation or a natural disaster, your whole world changes in an instant and so fast it makes you head spin. People have been known to lose tract of time and even whole days. Your whole body and personality feels like it's under attack mentally and physically as is my friend goes on to say. The Japanese people have a very calm manor to them with very little panic or mass civil unrest as seen here in the USA after a natural disaster. They have been very calm and orderly even in the face of extreme hardship in the face of a once in a life time disaster. "Day Four Time has seem to of stopped I don't even know what day it is anymore. Time has stopped for me. I go to bed at weird times, I wake up at weird times, I don't have my school schedule to let me know what day it is anymore. The aftershocks keep harrassing me, making sure I never get back to normal. Helicoptors and fire engines continue to flock around everywhere I look. I am still in Shirakawa. We have electricity and internet and gas, but still no water. Now that the nuclear disaster has escalated, we're not allowed to go outside anymore. In fact, we can't use anything that would circulate air from outside into the house, meaning we can't even use our air-con heater for the rest of the week. When I packed, I only thought I'd be gone for 2 days, 3 days max, so I didn't bring enough clothes or snacks. I did bring my laptop and my external hard-drive, but now I'm worried about my apartment being ruined by the radiation." I have always been savvy about being prepared for the unexpected from my time as a boy scout and the military. I feel in EMS this is a place where we can improve. We are thought to think on our feet as EMTs we don't always have the resources need to deal with situations every day. I feel the events happening in Japan right now should serve as a red flag to our leaders and serve as catalyst and ensure we are prepared for the unexpected. Please take some time and ask your supervisors and leaders in you EMS service what plans are in place should an unexpected mass emergency happen. As for my friend Jeff who is living the mass trio of disasters he is doing well. As expected there are food and fuel shortages and very long lines for daily necessities. Japan and the United States hold a very close bond and no one should have to go through a trio of mass disasters. "Seven days later and shortages are abundant Still no sign of Godzilla yet, but the radiation scare continues. Each day, the Japanese government assures us that the levels in the air around the Tohoku area are safe, while the international media is frantically screaming that everyone who only so much has ever seen a photo of Japan is going to die. I'm not sure who to believe. The Japanese are famous for brushing away big concerns, while the Western media is renowned for blowing things out of proportion for the sake higher ratings. I would just like some honest data without the bureaucratic/capitalistic BS. I know the rest of the world has pretty much moved on from this tragedy, but for me, it's a continuing problem." You can read all of Jeff's firsthand account here- Jeff's Japan Blog In closing the world will never forget the heroic men of the Tokyo Electric Power Company, that are doing their best to control the damaged nuclear reactors. The world owes them a debt of gratitude they are protecting the world from the horror of a catastrophic melt down and toxic radiation release. Please I implore all of you to donate to the Red Cross and support the people of Japan in their time of need. To our fellow brethren in the Japanese emergency service working untold hours and enduring UN imaginable situations and hardships you have the support of this blogger. Till next time please keep the feedback coming.

+medic

+medic

 

G'Day

G'day all, My name is Cheryl and I am an Advanced Care Paramedic living and working in a small town in the middle of the Aussie state of Queensland. My 'patch' covers over 55,000 square kilometres and apart from our handover day once a week - there is just one officer to cover this. We are never 'alone' though. There is a great group of volunteer Emergency drivers who we can call on at any time of the day or night. They all know the area and the roads so well, not to mention they know all of the properties. I am still not entirely sure what drew me to this place, but I am so glad I was. I work 8 days straight and I am on call each night of that...then ...6 days off. The people here have been so welcoming and even though we will need to be here a hundred years to be considered 'locals' we really feel at home here. The most overwhelming thing I have found so far is the distances - we travel over 180 kilometres each way to get the fortnightly groceries! As for the patients - its is a long two and a half hours when you are going out to a chest pain patient - plenty of time to plan your treatment!! Then, the slower three hour drive back to the hospital over dirt tracks and dodging the kangaroos and other wildlife on the road......BUT I LOVE IT! I look forward to hearing from some of you out there - love to share experiences and just have a chat!! Take care out there Cheryl-anne

Cheryl-anne

Cheryl-anne

 

File 3 "Training and Trust in Your Partner"

I was lucky to have a good EMT instructor when I took my EMT-B class. He was fantastic full man with years of experience and good morals. He’s a fair, wise, knowledgeable and an all around nice guy. Yet he had a UN canny knack of teaching us the little things a text book could not possibly print. One thing he told us was that you will get to know your partners on the truck better than your best friend or even your spouse. I work with a fantastic couple of partners at the Ambulance Service, I spend more time with them then I do with my girl friend it seems. In EMS you entrust your life to your partner for the good the bad and the crazy. People outside of EMS don’t understand this for the most part sadly. You have to work as a team to get the job done during a shift and when the crap hits the fan both of you have to be cool calm and collected. However some people are better to work with then others as life goes. You and your partner have to be in perfect communication and sink. If you’re not your heading for an accident or major risk to your life. My time in the Military thought me this well however a single EMT class does not prepare a lot of EMTs for this. One day I and my partner were doing a normal transfer and it all went wrong in the blink of an eye. I won’t go into details since I don’t want to name names or the specifics for legal reasons. The root cause of the problem was mistrust and lack of communication. Needless to say we had a major incident where my partner broke down in a very bad way that adversely affected the health and welfare of a patient and betrayed my trust. In an instant I found the training I received in my EMT class kick in like clockwork or a backup generator. Just like that I did a full head to toe trauma assessment and I was solely caring for this patient. The reason only I was caring for this patient was because I had to send my partner back to the truck to calm down and regroup since said partner was lost. In the end the patient was cared for and taken care of in a professional way. After the call and the mountain of paper work a something like this generates I sat down with my partner and talked about what went wrong. Sadly my partner was blaming the whole things on me and claimed outlandish things about me during the call to supervision. I maintained the truth and was 100 percent honest about what happened. This served me well with my co workers and supervisors in the after math and subsequent investigation. I never thought I would have a partner betray the fundamental trust we as EMS professionals have in each other. It’s a sad day when your partner who has more experience then you as an EMT lets you down in a major way. This bothered me in a major way for a long time after this call, my partner was openly joking about the call to people and was seemingly happy about what happened with made me even more UN happy. I am just glad I had the proper training and skill to provide outstanding patient care in times of extreme duress. I also learned a valuable lesson of how to properly communicate with my partner to make sure were 100 percent on the same page before, during and after any call. It’s so easy to rush and muddle though a call and just get it done but it does not always do good things for your patient. In the end my experience and EMT training served me well. It’s impressive during times of extreme duress when your training kicks in like a machine. For that I have my EMT instructor to thank many times over without you I would not be the fine EMT I am today.

+medic

+medic

 

File 2 "Dreams come true"

It's a rare day when a dream comes true on a call, EMS has a habit of throwing curve balls at you at the most unexpected times. The routine always seem to be the norm 99.9 percent of the time but that's all subject to change on a whim. We were dispatched to an assisted living facility for an older lady going in to the hospital for a routine CT scan. When we arrived the charge nurse met us at the door with a very worried look "we were worried you would not get here in time so we called 911" Normally when we pick up a patient all is well and everything is normal. Yet this time as soon as we showed up our basic transfer turned into an emergency call right before our eyes. The nurse pointed us down the hall to a room where the patient was. We rolled out stretcher into a nice and neat room to find an older senior citizen lying in bed having noticeable difficulty breathing, pale cool with purple lips and nail beds, she had a look of dread on her face. I looked at my partner who was a newer EMT and gave him a look of confidence as we both knew what we had to do. We grabbed a quick set of vital signs and basic assessment as the nurse explained her prior history of stroke, general weakness and how she has not been her normal self today. We put her on some o2 and moved her onto our stretcher. As we were wheeling her down the hall the mobile medics showed up and asked us if they were needed for the call. We kindly said no were all set since the patient was stable and well within our scope of practise not to mention the hospital was only two miles away. When we got in the back of the ambulance we did the normal secondary patient assessment, hooked up to the main o2 and made sure we had all the paperwork in order. We called the hospital on the radio to tell them what we had and how long it would be till we got there then we bucked in for the ride to the hospital. I jumped in the driver's seat and I got to do something I never done before, all though I have seen it done so many times in my life. I was about to drive the ambulance with lights and sirens on for the first time ever. I looked down at the black panel inscribed with the name Wheelen covered in dust and pressed the little red button which activated the familiar wail of sirens. I flipped on the top red light bar and side marker lights, just like that the ambulance was lit up like Times Square on New Year's Eve. I called us enroute to the hospital to dispatch then pressed on the gas and we were off and rolling. As I carefully drove at a safe speed down the street it was like a childhood dream watching the traffic part ways just to let me though. At that very moment the inner kid that has been oppressed in me for so long that has been dying to get out all these years, was set loose for that short 5 min ride. We pulled into the ER at the hospital and transferred our patient over to the skilled care of the ER. That short ride mine as well been miles long to the inner kid living inside of me all these years. After the call I was pretty happy with myself the Ambulance service I work for does not bring many people in this way. In the EMS world we normaly don't drive lights and sirens ever where we go. We are lucky if we switch them on when we stop on a busy street for a patient pick up let alone use them with sirens. That's the nature of working for a busy transport Ambulance service. On this call for the first time in my EMS career I drove with lights and sirens. I know it seems kind of corny to get all excited about this sort of thing but I'm entitled to my moment of privet excitement. One thing's for sure I will always remember this call since one of childhood dreams came true on that day and I will never forget it. It's a rare moment in one's life to have something you wanted to come true when you least expect it but I knew it would happen eventually in the world of EMS. Till next time please keep the feedback coming this blog is a work in progress......

+medic

+medic

 

File 1 Feb 23 2011 “The Light turns on”

EMS is a dynamic profession with many different facets that date back to the 60's and 70's and before. Out of all the emergency services EMS is the youngest and most miss understood. To quote an old move "Any one in distress will jump in the first rig that arrives and each is worth 42.50 plus 50 cents a mile." EMS has come a long way from the old days of you call we haul. I'm a rather new EMT but not to public service, my grandfather was a fireman in a little town in western NY, My father marching in his footsteps is a fireman/EMT in NH. Lastly there's me I'm a third generation public servant and a EMT. I grew up around fire trucks, scanners and emergency equipment. I have had an interest in public service for as long as I can remember. I spent six year as an aircraft mechanic in the Air Force, I spent time in Japan, UK, Germany and did a tour in Iraq. Once out of the military I took the EMT-B class and just like that I was a EMT. I found a job with an Ambulance company that does mostly nursing home and hospital transfers. It's a small company but there equipments clean and they treat us well. We don't due many emergency calls but were plenty busy for a company our size. Now some people think being an EMT is a glamorous job and fantastic profession to be in. Most people due to watching too many movies and TV have an excited yet misguided view of how we save people, speeding everywhere lights and sirens blaring rescuing old ladies out of trees and stuff. Well maybe not rescuing old ladies from trees but you get the idea. The more I have worked as an EMT I have realized john q public does not know that much about what we do as a profession. To be blunt EMS is a lot of busy tedious work with little to no thanks involved. The work tends to be very episodic and random. We are trained to handle everything from life and death situations to the mundane little things you would never think of. Not to mention the long spouts of boredom with intermittent bits of excitement splashed in between. So I think what the heck what have I gotten myself in to? No sane person would want to do this job my best friend say you have to be a bit crazy to be a EMT. I do enjoy helping people and that's all fine and dandy. That sort of thinking can only get you so far in this job. The more I think about it the reason why I do this job is not for the money that's for sure. I do it because I feel very fulfilled working with people. However it seems you work with the rude, bad, ugly and as well as the good at times. As an EMT you see people at their best to worst and everything in between. From the routine pleasant transport of a old lady to a doctor's appointment. To a drugged up man hanging out a third story window yelling at you and your partner to help him. Just to get up there to find him drugged up on coke and drunk with only one kidney. So yea that's a snibbit about me and what's it like to be a EMT. It's not like what you see on TV or in the movies. EMS a real job that normal people tend to forget about until they dial the magic three little numbers on their phone for a ambulance or fire truck. I'm aiming this blog to be an outlet of education and enlightenment for both me and the people that read it. I hope to spread this blog around and see where it goes. I would like to dedicate this blog to my father who is a big inspiration for me as a EMT and a person. I may still be green in the world of EMS but I have a firm belief that the best thing in life you can do is help someone. It's my sincere hope that by starting this blog will help me, the normal public and fellow EMS professionals become better people and understand what it is to be in EMS. I have a deep love for EMS and the Fire Service So please keep reading my blog. Feed back is always welcome so please feel free to leave some. Till next time….

+medic

+medic

 

What have I gotten myself into?

I recently posted in the ‘status messages’ that I had been accepted into the next medic program that is scheduled to start on 03/24/11. Now that the registration and confirmation process is done, I’ve had time to reflect on just what this all means… In 1995 I went through EMT-B for the first time. I thought I had the EMS field by the tail because I was able to successfully negotiate any scenario someone wanted to throw at me. The county Co-Medical Directors both came into my class and did ‘guest lectures’ and each scenario they threw out to the class was one more that I handed back to them with the answer they were looking for, (this later saved my ass, but that’s another story for another time). Twelve years later, I found myself in the position to have to start at the bottom once again, and retake EMT-B. This time around, I was the bane of my instructor’s existence, because I was able to challenge ‘bad information’ and ask the ‘tough questions’ so that my classmates could gain deeper understanding and more knowledge. When I moved up to EMT-I, I had to buckle down and learn some new material, but still managed to excel to the point that when I sat for my first NREMT test, I smoked it on the first shot. I was comfortable knowing that there was so much I didn’t know, but would gain as I progressed. I was still in a position to be able to help my classmates through the ‘tough stuff’, and to my preceptors, I was able to ‘jump right in there’ and get the things done that they needed; so that they could attend to the things that I couldn’t do. Looking back, I see that as an EMT-B, there wasn’t much that I could do, and if I did something wrong; it was an ‘easy fix’ for those who are higher up the food chain that I was. I’m not trivializing EMT-B, but let’s be honest; the opportunities to be able to stop, regroup and start again are plentiful. As an EMT-I, I started getting into basic pharmacology, and the consequences of an ‘oops’ were considerably more serious. Now that I’m facing medic school, I’ve realized that I’m moving into an arena where an ‘oops’ is quite possibly fatal. Some would say that this realization only points out that I’ll have to study my ass off to be good enough where the opportunity to make a mistake is minimized. As I contemplate what lies ahead, its hit me square between the eyes that people’s lives are at stake, and I had BETTER know my stuff, inside and out! Yeah, I’m scared senseless, apprehensive as hell and I’ll probably be a nervous wreck by the time it’s all over. As an EMT-B, I thought I was ‘da man’ and there wasn’t too much that you could throw at me that I couldn’t handle. Now that’s all been snatched away from me, and to tell the truth, I don’t like this feeling at all! I’ve always watched medics at work, and wished I could do even half the things they do. Now that I’m getting ready to step into their world, I’m like a kid on his first day of school. Part of me wants to just stop right here and stay in my ‘comfort zone’, but I know that I can’t do that. There are too many of you here that have poked and prodded me this far, and I highly doubt that you’ll let me start slacking off now. Right now, I’m dealing with an overwhelming feeling that I don’t know enough to even set foot in the Paramedic classroom, that I’m not ready for this and that I’m just a ‘washout waiting to happen’…. During my first 12 years in EMS, if anyone asked me if I wanted to go on to Medic School, I would have told them in no uncertain terms that I wasn’t going. I was comfortable as hell knowing that pharmacology (at the Medic level) was something I didn’t have to deal with. I used to joke that if you took an EKG strip and turned it 90º to the right and read it from top to bottom, it looked like something that came out of a seismograph. Now I have to be able to read those ‘squiggly lines’ and know that it means someone’s heart is actually doing things it supposed to; and if it isn’t , I have to know what to do about it. I can no longer dismiss it as that bitch San Andreas throwing stuff around in a temper tantrum. Pharmacology and cardiology scared the bejeebers out of me (and it still does). I don’t know how all the medics in the field can keep all this sh*t straight in their heads! I’ve come a long way from ‘putting band-aids on boo-boos’ and the days of high-flow O2 and ‘haul ass’ while screaming for an ALS intercept. I’m now stepping into a world where I will have to be the one answering those cries for ALS. Knowing it’s a long way to the bottom, I’m not sure I’m fully prepared to make that leap…..

Lone Star

Lone Star

 

College Life

Well, I have it completely figured out! I caught up with my college algebra professor the other day and informed him that I'm filing a lawsuit against the college and that the math department and every instructor I've had since starting college has been personally named in the suit. The smile fell from his face as the color drained into his loafers, and he stammered 'Wh-why are you f-f-filing a l-l-lawsuit?" I informed him that because of the algebra courses I've had to take in order to meet the math requirements for my degree, I've developed arithmophobia (a fear of numbers); and since I've only developed this phobia since I started college, that it wasn't difficult to pinpoint the cause of this 'life altering phobia'. I wish I'd had a camera at that point! Today, I have to attempt at registering for classes for next quarter (again). I tried on Monday, but there were major snags and snafus for every class I needed, (so much for computers making life easier!). Ended up having to go back to my Academic Advisor and asking him to let them know that I've either already met the prerequisites or am currently enrolled in prerequisite classes; (I've long complained about having to register for classes that are dependant on passing the classes I'm currently in). While determining that I either meet or am in the process of meeting the prerequisite class requirements, I've established (according to the program requirements and 'points' for each class) that I should exceed the program requirements by at least 10 credit hours. By the information in the course catalogue and the program description, I need 104 credit hours and by the same criteria, I will have 114 credit hours (if I take no more 'elective courses' during my time at the college). My Academic Advisor says there's an error in that criteria (he says the college has 'overvalued' the credit hours on one of my classes). Looks like a trip to Student Affairs is next on the list! Even if they reduce the 'point value' on the one class, I'll still have enough points to graduate in July 2012, providing I don't fail out of the program! The only other 'big concern' that might affect this date is that the college is switching from the 'quarter system (4 ten week sessions) to the 'semester system (two 16 week sessions). I have to attend a meeting today with the committee that was established to oversee the transition....

Lone Star

Lone Star

 

laryngoscopes

dont know why we went over this because laryngoscopes are not in a EMT scope, but i had fun doing it took me 4 times to get it, but will be good to practice for it when i start my paramedic class

Kyle2011

Kyle2011