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Would you stop?

189 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Every once in a while a case comes up that provides an opportunity for some learning.

Here's one that may fit that bill:

JEMS story on FDNY EMS unit

It's interesting to see the comments at the bottom of the article. Although I can't believe some people really believe what they were writing.

Personally, I think both providers should get some mandated time off if not fired outright. Not only did they act stupidly but they put more than just themselves in danger.

I'm interested in the discussion this will bring.

-be safe

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Posted · Report post

Stupid stupid stupid stupid.... and downright negligent as well... extreme whackerism.. IMHO

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Posted · Report post

I've always been told, if you see an accident, and or are flagged down and you have a patient you must stop as long as your patient is not critical. Each technician will assume responsibility for one patient.

It's a very hairy situation but thats always what i was told.

Could be wrong though.

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Posted · Report post

I can't believe some of the things that people come up. They were transporting a pediatric seizure patient and decided to stop at the scene of a car accident? And then there's people who believe that they were obligated to stop? Had the child had any negative outcome, and regardless of the medical outcome of the patient they could sue for "emotional trauma" I'm sure due to being placed in that situation while already experiencing an event themselves. To stop for an accident is negligent, regardless of the stability of the patient. I think we should all be able to agree that the appropriate thing that should have been done would be to call for an additional unit.

An ambulance that didn't have a patient on board would have been an entirely different situation however. But that's not the case here...

Shane

NREMT-P

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Posted · Report post

I've always been told, if you see an accident, and or are flagged down and you have a patient you must stop as long as your patient is not critical. Each technician will assume responsibility for one patient.

It's a very hairy situation but thats always what i was told.

Could be wrong though.

This may vary state by state, but once you're dispatched to a call you are committed to that patient and that call until it's completion. This includes arrival at the hospital. If you're on your way to a scene, you can advise dispatch you came across an accident and see if they want to reassign you. But otherwise, you have a "duty to act." Any delay that has an adverse effect on the initial patient is caused by your negligence in responding to their request for assistance. Unless dispatch reassigns you to the car accident prior to making patient contact, you need to see your call all the way to the hospital before initiating another call. What happens when you arrive to find this "critical" patient involved in a car accident and your partner is out there by himself? What if he encounters violence like in this call and you're not there to assist him? One of the golden rules for me is to never leave my partner alone in an unknown scene. Things turn quickly. But back to the critical patient, you're a legal ambulance capable of transport...except you have a patient in the back of your ambulance. This is a different scenario from an intercept medic who routinely responds alone in a vehicle not capable of patient transport. If you notify dispatch so they can send the appropriate resources to the scene of the accident you came across you have met your duty to act. By stopping, you've gone over the line and open yourself to liability with the patient you're responding to, or transporting.

Shane

NREMT-P

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Posted · Report post

I know, personally, that we've passed a car accident or two, where there were injuries, but all we did was radio it in, because we had a patient in the back. Once you stop to check for injuries, you can not leave until someone with the same, or better training has come to relieve you. This is how we do it in my area, however, I do not know what the FDNY EMS's protocols are.

Interesting article, however, thanks for bringing it in to discussion!

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Posted · Report post

wow...our service would not stop...we would use the radio to give the location and call for another ambulance, also why would you stop with a seizing nine month old???

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There are too few details included in the "report" to judge what is right & wrong. I wasn't there, I can't say what I would have done, each case is unique and must be judged based on ALL the FACTS. It is foolish (unless you are a whacker) to try and draw any conclusions/judgements based on what is presented.

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Posted · Report post

What facts are missing? What additional information would you like to see? What do you think based on what's presented?

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I would not say I would never stop or that I would always stop; it would depend on the situation. In this case it is not clear just how stable or unstable their 9-month-old patient was and it was not clear how serious the MVA was. Those that say they would never stop with a patient on board, here is scenario to consider. You are transporting an elderly patient from a care home, they had a fall from standing and their only complaint is hip pain, vitals are normal and the only injury seen is shortening and rotation of one leg. Enroute to hospital you witness a 10-year-old pedestrian who is thrown 20 feet, lands on his back and is not moving. Do you stop to assess, or continue on and radio for another unit?

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