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Spinal Restriction

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Just wondering how many services are no longer using backboards to spinal "immobilize" or restrict patients with back pain from trauma?

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our service makes all trauma patients walk, no matter if they still have their legs attached or not.  

Just kidding.  I'm not currently working so I'm not a good reference.  

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Lol. Last year my service stopped using back boards or spine boards. All due to an international study. (Don't remember the name).  90% of the Area physicians agree. We now use the boards to move patients and then remove the boards. Patients remain in a c-collar. I'm just wondering how much of the Nation and international EMS services are also following this treatment.

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Same...backboards for extrication only. Occasionally we might leave someone on if packaged up and its a very short transport time, maybe 5-10minutes max.

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I went from a service that didn't use them, back to a service that uses them religiously. It's SO frustrating. The ER doctors have a fit if you show up without a backboard, this is something that frustrates me to no end.

There are SO many studies that prove them to be more harmful than helpful, yet it takes so long for services to get on board.

On another note, I broke my back 2 years ago and there's no way in hell I could have been on a backboard. That just adds to my hatred of them. I don't like to knowingly cause more pain for my patients.

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A lot of the units transporting to my ER use scoop stretchers now.  Our policy for walk-in's that meet c-spine criteria are collar and lay flat on the bed, we put a blanket roll under the knees also usually to help or bed the knee on our stretchers

 

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Local services still use them.  There are guidelines that are designed to reduce their use.  However, it seems old habits die hard in some people.  We try to clear them as quickly as possible upon arrival.

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When I first started I followed ever rule and protocol we had. Until I saw a very thin, 80+ year old man lay on a board for several hours in a hospital. He was in more pain from the board then the fall he took that fractured his arm.

The next fall I encountered in the elderly I asked about pain, logged rolled and felt the spine and then put them on a mega mover instead.

I was sternly reprimanded by the physician at the ED. After that, I started to ask my patients who were not complaining  of any neck or back pain if they wanted to be strapped to a board. When they said no, I then would ask if they were refusing? If I got  a solid yes, my verbal report stated as much.

I am now at a different service but still transport to that hospital. I am no longer questions about it as they have caught up with the times more and I will still transport a severe MOI patient on one .

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my service still carries them, as stated before... mostly movement/ extrication/ CPR needs with strict "we had to keep them on the board for X reasons" mostly altered LOC following trauma, etc. otherwise just a C/ X-collar while laying on the cot

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Backboards are great for getting the ambulance out of the sand that is up to the rear bumper when you are at the beach, so I hear.  Otherwise they aren't too useful.

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