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Teaching EMR Classes

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I was able to get a short time gig covering and teaching a few courses in a EMR class with my state fire school. I was wondering if anyone has ever gotten the chance to teach or aide with teaching and could give me some advice?

The school has given me a few books which are the EMR first on scene 9th edition & a workbook which is sort of funny because the workbook isn't from the same publisher or author as the EMR first on scene book, but covers most of everything in the book. I also got a book on OB/GYN emergencies with a self printed OB/GYN teaching manual from the fire school. The thing is the teaching manual does not really cover how to teach the class. The manual is full of quick facts, and some terminology and short ways to describe the actual OB/GYN book. <_<

The only teaching I have ever done was back in college when I would have to give oral reports in front of my class on selected topics. :P

Luckily the classes don't start till the 20th of January..

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A lot of the material to cover in an EMR class (assuming EMR in the states is at least similar to EMR in Canada ... ) is teaching tactile skills (spinal motion restriction, applying a traction splint, CPR, AED, etc etc. In my limited teaching experience, what I've done is Discuss, Demonstrate, Describe, Do. After a discussion on principals of management or what-have-you, run a demonstration at normal speed, follow that up by a step by step demo with explanation, allow for some questions, and then turn your students loose in their groups to work through the skill. Once everyone has had a chance to practice the skill once or twice, we usually run full call simulations that incorporate what they just practised into the context of their patient assessment model.

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A lot of the material to cover in an EMR class (assuming EMR in the states is at least similar to EMR in Canada ... ) is teaching tactile skills (spinal motion restriction, applying a traction splint, CPR, AED, etc etc. In my limited teaching experience, what I've done is Discuss, Demonstrate, Describe, Do. After a discussion on principals of management or what-have-you, run a demonstration at normal speed, follow that up by a step by step demo with explanation, allow for some questions, and then turn your students loose in their groups to work through the skill. Once everyone has had a chance to practice the skill once or twice, we usually run full call simulations that incorporate what they just practised into the context of their patient assessment model.

I like that! I mainly will the teaching on Ob/Gyn is bleeding and birth. There is a couple birthing simulators, one is a full size simulator, then the one is just lower abdomen and down. So as you were sort of saying do the book work (there is required quizzes) then demonstrate how it's down, then split them in to two groups. Then where they can do on their own and I am there to assist with any questions. After that sit them together review what we went over in the book and the actual simulator then hand out the quizzes. After the quizzes just do a super quick review of what went down over the day if there's enough time. Do you think it's ethical?

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What you might do is simply talk about each type of call or situation in a non-skills setting. Ideally, they'll get a little A&P and background on the topic first, but that can be really hard to do when new teaching. What's easy for me when teaching a new topic is to talk through a call, then stopping to explain things as they come up.

For example, childbirth. Lead them through a scenario...there'll be a lot of chance to stop and talk about additional BSI, knowing what's in their OB kits, how the call might be dispatched, how the patient might present (emotions of patient...fears students may have), questions you'll want to ask mother about current pregnancy, about past health/pregnancy, and about events that led to the call (signs of birth, etc).

Then progress to how you'd set up for delivery, the actual process, and complications they might come across, caring for both afterwards, post-delivery stuff (placenta, etc).

While you should never teach to the test, it's helpful to look at a skills testing sheet when setting up for it to make sure you cover each part. Maybe try to find a video on childbirth (youtube?). After, some discussion and questions.

Then maybe a break, then get to the skills. They'll probably want to go over it again. So talk through it again. and/or do one live version with a role-player mom, so they get to see the EMR-patient interaction.

Then, I personally like to do the first practice run all together as a class (I do it in front of the class, they do in their small groups), step by step, pausing so everyone catches up, so they don't all start skipping stuff. Having an outline on the board where they can all look up and see instead of trying to remember (or looking down at their skills sheet) is helpful too. After one run together, they get free practice.

If they start getting bored or distracted or feel they "got it", have those students do it in front of the class without their papers. Through some curve balls (breech, prolapsed, etc)

Then definitely a wrap up at the end for any questions.

Rinse and repeat for each topic/skill...might combine some if they're real short ones.

Oh, and as a new teacher, don't forget to practice it all yourself. Both the skills and teaching it. Practice the presentation. EMT partners make good practice audiences. They can think of some good questions to ask you that they had when they were students or that they think might be asked of you.

And if you choke up or mess up, play it cool, and just keep going. Correct yourself when needed, but just keep flowing. I always find it easier to teach if I get some informal chatting time with the students before class starts too...it helps break the ice on both ends (and so they'll be more interactive with you).

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Your state doesn't require a teaching certificate to teach EMS? I would start with creating the course outline, curriculum, and then a lesson plan for each class. I would always have a binder per class and a tab for each class with the lesson plan and any materials I would need already ready to go.

The course outline should include the chapters covered and organized so you can be sure to cover all essential material in the time given. The curriculum is what the students get a copy of and should include your expectations for what they need to know by the end of the class, and should have your contact information incase they need to miss a class or arrive late.

The lesson plans should have an objective for each contact meeting. What you hope to teach them in that lesson and how you are going to do it. This is where I would make notes about a certain call I had run that was relevant. Be careful to not rely too much on past scenarios though.

As Anthony said, run through each lesson plan. Teaching is probably 75% prep work and only 25% actually teaching.

Good luck and remember to stay confident :)

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Your state doesn't require a teaching certificate to teach EMS? I would start with creating the course outline, curriculum, and then a lesson plan for each class. I would always have a binder per class and a tab for each class with the lesson plan and any materials I would need already ready to go.

The course outline should include the chapters covered and organized so you can be sure to cover all essential material in the time given. The curriculum is what the students get a copy of and should include your expectations for what they need to know by the end of the class, and should have your contact information incase they need to miss a class or arrive late.

The lesson plans should have an objective for each contact meeting. What you hope to teach them in that lesson and how you are going to do it. This is where I would make notes about a certain call I had run that was relevant. Be careful to not rely too much on past scenarios though.

As Anthony said, run through each lesson plan. Teaching is probably 75% prep work and only 25% actually teaching.

Good luck and remember to stay confident :)

I have finished a FTO program through my agency, I have yet to go through the instructor course yet. This has been approved by the director of the fire school to proceed with. I am not teaching the whole class, mainly focusing on the OB/GYN portion of it.

But thank you very much for the information! :) I will use all of your guys advice.

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It's been about 10 years since I taught a first responder class. As I understand the EMR [new terminology] course is basic airway, breathing , splinting , & bleeding control, CPR and very little else.

How many hours is the new standard course requirement?

It was 44 hours for the First responder level which is now history.

Teaching adults is very much like teaching 6 year olds, only you can use bigger words.

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It's been about 10 years since I taught a first responder class. As I understand the EMR [new terminology] course is basic airway, breathing , splinting , & bleeding control, CPR and very little else.

How many hours is the new standard course requirement?

It was 44 hours for the First responder level which is now history.

Teaching adults is very much like teaching 6 year olds, only you can use bigger words.

It covers all of that. The OB/GYN counts under the "very little else" I would guess. It covers the basics of bleeding and child birthing. EMR course is now 40 hours.

In result I will be teaching a 2nd grade class, minus the subtraction and addition? Should be interesting.. :icecream:

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Well keep it simple and fun, remember that it's not about you, it's about the class, what can you do to present the information in a dynamic and memorable way? OB is fun because you can have wacky scenarios, I like to always have one of the guys be the first "mom" to kick things off with a light note and break the ice. Make sure not to read the powerpoints to the class, great way to put them to sleep, just use them to highlight what you are saying. My powerpoints have as little text as possible to keep me from focusing on it and not on my class.

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Well keep it simple and fun, remember that it's not about you, it's about the class, what can you do to present the information in a dynamic and memorable way? OB is fun because you can have wacky scenarios, I like to always have one of the guys be the first "mom" to kick things off with a light note and break the ice. Make sure not to read the powerpoints to the class, great way to put them to sleep, just use them to highlight what you are saying. My powerpoints have as little text as possible to keep me from focusing on it and not on my class.

What do you mean by having one of the guys be the first "mom" ?

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Death by powerpoint is the fastest way to lose an audience.

Use it as an outline to the lecture.

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Diddos to all the prior posters. I would also encourage you to consider instructor insurance.

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Diddos to all the prior posters. I would also encourage you to consider instructor insurance.

State fire school holds liability for everything.

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What do you mean by having one of the guys be the first "mom" ?

Take the birthing dummy and throw a blanket over the actor's nether regions and put the dummy (if it's just a pelvic dummy) under the blanket and have the actor go into "labor". Gives the student a opportunity to ham it up. I would personally pick one of the class clowns to start with as the "Mom", the more people get into it the more fun you will have as a class. Just make sure to reign in the class before they get to much off the rails (somebody always spikes the baby for some reason)

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Death by powerpoint is the fastest way to lose an audience.

Use it as an outline to the lecture.

This times 100. If you lose the audience you might as well pass out the power point and go home. Often the books will have online resources to use as well, ranging from power points, to lesson plans and videos. I recommend against using them verbatim, but they can give you great ideas of ways to go you haven't thought of. You don't want to spend too long on any one media, especially in a fire school setting. If I remember right, the major publishers design ems materials to the tenth grade level. Keep that in mind as well. Switch up media from videos to slides to hands on. Even if you don't want to teach full time, I'd highly recommend taking some courses in adult education. With the right instructor you can learn lots about communication and theory

Sent from my Galaxy S III on Tapatalk!

Edited by brentoli
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What state agency oversees EMS? For me it is the Dept. of Health. If it were me my first stop would be the Dept of Health website to look at the requirements to be an EMR. As an instructor you will be teaching them to state or national standards so they can pass their tests. The state should give you a good idea of what you need to teach.

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What state agency oversees EMS? For me it is the Dept. of Health. If it were me my first stop would be the Dept of Health website to look at the requirements to be an EMR. As an instructor you will be teaching them to state or national standards so they can pass their tests. The state should give you a good idea of what you need to teach.

I have all the teaching material that the students are required to learn, and then be tested on to certify as an EMR. The only thing I didn't know is how to deliver it, they just gave me the material, when and what needs to be taught to the students. All they care is that they are taught and pass the exams.

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"All they care is that they are taught and pass the exams. "

what else would you expect from the fire service. They don't really care if they know how to provide proper care as long as they pass the test.

I can say this as a two hatter.

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"All they care is that they are taught and pass the exams. "

what else would you expect from the fire service. They don't really care if they know how to provide proper care as long as they pass the test.

I can say this as a two hatter.

You say this as ignorant idiot.

To say that all fire services provide an inferior service than for profit EMS simply means your opinion is as useless as you seem to be. I have worked for Public and private EMS, hospital based and in the ER, and the fire service I work for now has the greatest dedication to the quality of care we provide than any of the other places I have worked. I know of fire departments that do not have such dedication and I know of private EMS services that are only out there to make a buck. If you can't be a fire fighter that is dedicated to providing the highest care for your patients, maybe you should do the fire service a favor and go flip burgers, Sorry to derail your excellent thread Patton.

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ResQ: There is an old saying TABBOMA.

I have been in the business for over 4 decades, worked for private mom & pops, 3 rd service ,corporate EMS ,large urban and rural systems & I'm currently head of a fire service based EMS system.I do know what I'm talking about.

If the fire service there was really into providing proper care , they would require a higher level of traing than EMR. It is the equivalent amount of training as given to red cross first aiders or boy scouts for a merit badge.

Actually the last group of boy scouts I taught were required to have 60 hours of wilderness first aid training .

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Isn't an ignorant person and a idiot the same thing?

But with the comment I wasn't trying to slam the fire service, they are teaching people to also go into the EMS. I am not a fan of my state fire school which I have been there for several classes and all they do is power point, power point, and power point. Someone mentioned earlier about death by power point which is the truth. In general all the school wants is for the students to pass the course, really like any other school. I just want to make it worth their while cause most of the students that attend there are required to by their department.

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Isn't an ignorant person and a idiot the same thing?

No. They are not synonymous.

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Ignorance is a lack of knowledge or understanding. It doesn't mean they lack the intelligence to be able to learn more about the topic. I'm ignorant about Lean 3P, but I'm reading up on it so that I can learn prior to the design process for our new health facility. An individual who is ignorant is known as an ignoramus. An idiot is a derogation for individuals with a mental deficiency and learning disability. Typically they would lack the capability to learn complex topics. True, they may be ignorant, but only by virtue of being incapable of learning.

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