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Teaching EMR Classes

23 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

I was able to get a short time gig covering and teaching a few courses in a EMR class with my state fire school. I was wondering if anyone has ever gotten the chance to teach or aide with teaching and could give me some advice?

The school has given me a few books which are the EMR first on scene 9th edition & a workbook which is sort of funny because the workbook isn't from the same publisher or author as the EMR first on scene book, but covers most of everything in the book. I also got a book on OB/GYN emergencies with a self printed OB/GYN teaching manual from the fire school. The thing is the teaching manual does not really cover how to teach the class. The manual is full of quick facts, and some terminology and short ways to describe the actual OB/GYN book. <_<

The only teaching I have ever done was back in college when I would have to give oral reports in front of my class on selected topics. :P

Luckily the classes don't start till the 20th of January..

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Posted · Report post

A lot of the material to cover in an EMR class (assuming EMR in the states is at least similar to EMR in Canada ... ) is teaching tactile skills (spinal motion restriction, applying a traction splint, CPR, AED, etc etc. In my limited teaching experience, what I've done is Discuss, Demonstrate, Describe, Do. After a discussion on principals of management or what-have-you, run a demonstration at normal speed, follow that up by a step by step demo with explanation, allow for some questions, and then turn your students loose in their groups to work through the skill. Once everyone has had a chance to practice the skill once or twice, we usually run full call simulations that incorporate what they just practised into the context of their patient assessment model.

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[quote name='cprted' timestamp='1354592608' post='291047']
A lot of the material to cover in an EMR class (assuming EMR in the states is at least similar to EMR in Canada ... ) is teaching tactile skills (spinal motion restriction, applying a traction splint, CPR, AED, etc etc. In my limited teaching experience, what I've done is Discuss, Demonstrate, Describe, Do. After a discussion on principals of management or what-have-you, run a demonstration at normal speed, follow that up by a step by step demo with explanation, allow for some questions, and then turn your students loose in their groups to work through the skill. Once everyone has had a chance to practice the skill once or twice, we usually run full call simulations that incorporate what they just practised into the context of their patient assessment model.
[/quote]

I like that! I mainly will the teaching on Ob/Gyn is bleeding and birth. There is a couple birthing simulators, one is a full size simulator, then the one is just lower abdomen and down. So as you were sort of saying do the book work (there is required quizzes) then demonstrate how it's down, then split them in to two groups. Then where they can do on their own and I am there to assist with any questions. After that sit them together review what we went over in the book and the actual simulator then hand out the quizzes. After the quizzes just do a super quick review of what went down over the day if there's enough time. Do you think it's ethical?

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Posted · Report post

What you might do is simply talk about each type of call or situation in a non-skills setting. Ideally, they'll get a little A&P and background on the topic first, but that can be really hard to do when new teaching. What's easy for me when teaching a new topic is to talk through a call, then stopping to explain things as they come up.

For example, childbirth. Lead them through a scenario...there'll be a lot of chance to stop and talk about additional BSI, knowing what's in their OB kits, how the call might be dispatched, how the patient might present (emotions of patient...fears students may have), questions you'll want to ask mother about current pregnancy, about past health/pregnancy, and about events that led to the call (signs of birth, etc).

Then progress to how you'd set up for delivery, the actual process, and complications they might come across, caring for both afterwards, post-delivery stuff (placenta, etc).

While you should never teach to the test, it's helpful to look at a skills testing sheet when setting up for it to make sure you cover each part. Maybe try to find a video on childbirth (youtube?). After, some discussion and questions.

Then maybe a break, then get to the skills. They'll probably want to go over it again. So talk through it again. and/or do one live version with a role-player mom, so they get to see the EMR-patient interaction.

Then, I personally like to do the first practice run all together as a class (I do it in front of the class, they do in their small groups), step by step, pausing so everyone catches up, so they don't all start skipping stuff. Having an outline on the board where they can all look up and see instead of trying to remember (or looking down at their skills sheet) is helpful too. After one run together, they get free practice.

If they start getting bored or distracted or feel they "got it", have those students do it in front of the class without their papers. Through some curve balls (breech, prolapsed, etc)

Then definitely a wrap up at the end for any questions.

Rinse and repeat for each topic/skill...might combine some if they're real short ones.

Oh, and as a new teacher, don't forget to practice it all yourself. Both the skills and teaching it. Practice the presentation. EMT partners make good practice audiences. They can think of some good questions to ask you that they had when they were students or that they think might be asked of you.

And if you choke up or mess up, play it cool, and just keep going. Correct yourself when needed, but just keep flowing. I always find it easier to teach if I get some informal chatting time with the students before class starts too...it helps break the ice on both ends (and so they'll be more interactive with you).

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Posted · Report post

Your state doesn't require a teaching certificate to teach EMS? I would start with creating the course outline, curriculum, and then a lesson plan for each class. I would always have a binder per class and a tab for each class with the lesson plan and any materials I would need already ready to go.

The course outline should include the chapters covered and organized so you can be sure to cover all essential material in the time given. The curriculum is what the students get a copy of and should include your expectations for what they need to know by the end of the class, and should have your contact information incase they need to miss a class or arrive late.

The lesson plans should have an objective for each contact meeting. What you hope to teach them in that lesson and how you are going to do it. This is where I would make notes about a certain call I had run that was relevant. Be careful to not rely too much on past scenarios though.

As Anthony said, run through each lesson plan. Teaching is probably 75% prep work and only 25% actually teaching.

Good luck and remember to stay confident :)

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[quote name='Kate_826' timestamp='1354626346' post='291057']
Your state doesn't require a teaching certificate to teach EMS? I would start with creating the course outline, curriculum, and then a lesson plan for each class. I would always have a binder per class and a tab for each class with the lesson plan and any materials I would need already ready to go.

The course outline should include the chapters covered and organized so you can be sure to cover all essential material in the time given. The curriculum is what the students get a copy of and should include your expectations for what they need to know by the end of the class, and should have your contact information incase they need to miss a class or arrive late.

The lesson plans should have an objective for each contact meeting. What you hope to teach them in that lesson and how you are going to do it. This is where I would make notes about a certain call I had run that was relevant. Be careful to not rely too much on past scenarios though.

As Anthony said, run through each lesson plan. Teaching is probably 75% prep work and only 25% actually teaching.

Good luck and remember to stay confident :)
[/quote]

I have finished a FTO program through my agency, I have yet to go through the instructor course yet. This has been approved by the director of the fire school to proceed with. I am not teaching the whole class, mainly focusing on the OB/GYN portion of it.

But thank you very much for the information! :) I will use all of your guys advice.

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It's been about 10 years since I taught a first responder class. As I understand the EMR [new terminology] course is basic airway, breathing , splinting , & bleeding control, CPR and very little else.
How many hours is the new standard course requirement?
It was 44 hours for the First responder level which is now history.

Teaching adults is very much like teaching 6 year olds, only you can use bigger words.

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[quote name='island emt' timestamp='1354660498' post='291094']
It's been about 10 years since I taught a first responder class. As I understand the EMR [new terminology] course is basic airway, breathing , splinting , & bleeding control, CPR and very little else.
How many hours is the new standard course requirement?
It was 44 hours for the First responder level which is now history.

Teaching adults is very much like teaching 6 year olds, only you can use bigger words.
[/quote]

It covers all of that. The OB/GYN counts under the "very little else" I would guess. It covers the basics of bleeding and child birthing. EMR course is now 40 hours.

In result I will be teaching a 2nd grade class, minus the subtraction and addition? Should be interesting.. :icecream:

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Well keep it simple and fun, remember that it's not about you, it's about the class, what can you do to present the information in a dynamic and memorable way? OB is fun because you can have wacky scenarios, I like to always have one of the guys be the first "mom" to kick things off with a light note and break the ice. Make sure not to read the powerpoints to the class, great way to put them to sleep, just use them to highlight what you are saying. My powerpoints have as little text as possible to keep me from focusing on it and not on my class.
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[quote name='Resqmedic' timestamp='1354674065' post='291106']
Well keep it simple and fun, remember that it's not about you, it's about the class, what can you do to present the information in a dynamic and memorable way? OB is fun because you can have wacky scenarios, I like to always have one of the guys be the first "mom" to kick things off with a light note and break the ice. Make sure not to read the powerpoints to the class, great way to put them to sleep, just use them to highlight what you are saying. My powerpoints have as little text as possible to keep me from focusing on it and not on my class.
[/quote]

What do you mean by having one of the guys be the first "mom" ?

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