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CBRN // HazMat trainings and procedures


Posted · Report post

Hello guys,

I was wondering what kind of CBRN protocole you had in your services, what kind of equipments and what would be your role in case of major or minor CBRN event, either accidental or criminal.

If you don't have anything to respond to this kind of problem, do you think it would be good to develop that field? If you have procedures, are you happy with them?

Are you concerned by CBRN issues, for instance if you work in a sensitive area (big city, near chemical industries etc...)?

Thanks

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Posted · Report post

Well, I know a couple of Creepy British Registered Nurses, but I don't really need to take many precautions, they're like 70 years old.
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Posted · Report post

Sorry, I'll detail that:

CBRN stands for : [size=5][b]Chemical Biological Radioactive Nuclear.[/b][/size]

[size=5][size=4]It's about all the issues related to the spreading of such threats in inhabited areas[/size][/size]

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Posted · Report post

oooooooohhhh, ok. Never heard of it. We're kinda like the TV show on Fox a few years back..."Jericho" I'm in such an insignificant location that we'd likely be one of the few places so Isolated as to survive such a threat. What's the difference between radioactive and nuclear?

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Posted · Report post

He he I see, that's why I asked if "you" were in a area concerned with this kind of problem. If you're isolated, and not located near a chemical facility, then you should be fine!

To answer your question, "nuclear" is what is related to the artificial fusion or fission af atoms either for civil or military purpose. The classic examples are nuclear power plants (we have a lot of them in France) and a nuke device.
"Radioactive" is related to naturally radioactive elements. For instance, radioactive elements used in hospitals, or radioactive wastes. Those elements are usually concealed, yet is for any reason they're released it can become a real problem as exposure can result in very serious long-term injuries/deseases.

A quick reminder about radioactivity, there are 3 things that keep you safe:
- Distance: As you increase the distance from the source, the radioactivity decreases. Even in an open field, getting as far as possible will drastically decreases the consequences.
- Time of exposure: The longer you stay around, the more to receive radioactive rays emitted by the source. If you have to get in a contaminated area, calculate carefully your time of exposure.
- Shield: Keep in mind there are no suits able to deflect radioactivity. A thick layer of lead will stop the dangerous rays, otherwise seek shelter behind thick walls or underground. Even if most materials cannot protect you, a thin shield is better than nothing.

Those are the basic things we develop during the trainings :)

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Posted · Report post

Okay, I just figured radiation was the byproduct of nuclear fission but I do recall that there are other radioactive things out there, such as oil well logging devices, X-ray machines and our uranium mines. Uranium in its natural form has a certain amount of radioactivity doesn't it?

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Posted · Report post

[quote]Uranium in its natural form has a certain amount of radioactivity doesn't it?[/quote]

A lot of mineral have natural radioactivity and go through radioactive decay. It becomes an issue when the level of radiations emitted goes beyond a certain number. Those are set by norms and safety rules...

Uranium is indeed known for its high radioactivity.

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