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new paramedic - question on breathing treatments


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29 replies to this topic

#11 JakeEMTP

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:10 PM

There are site rules? Posted Image

I have a feeling your sarcastic side is slipping through and I actually chuckled, being a huge fan of sarcasm. But yeah, right next to the "twit-ter" insignia are (gasp!) the rules!
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#12 tcripp

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:11 PM

I have a feeling your sarcastic side is slipping through and I actually chuckled, being a huge fan of sarcasm.

Oops. Busted!
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#13 VentMedic

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:36 PM

Thanks. Not all systems use the same abbreviations and that's not been one of mine. That one we are expected to spell out. :D

Actually, it would be great if everyone got in the habit of spelling out the word with their suggested abbreviation in the original post. Then, others can follow suit if they choose. That way, we are all on the same page. (i.e., ...pnuemonia (PNA)...)

Either that, or we create a page on this site with agreed to abbreviations/acronyms?


There are certain standardized abbreviations/acronyms that must be used which you will commonly see in hospitals and long term care facilities. There is also a list of abbreviations that must not be used.

JCAHO "do not use" list:
http://www.jointcomm.../0/dnu_list.pdf

Some disease processes such as pneumonia (PNA), cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)have accepted abbreviations. Chronic obstructive lung disease is sometimes used but not as often as COPD. A patient may be more likely to use the term if the physician brought the language into simpler terms. Chronic lung disease (CLD) is sometimes used in describing infant and pedi pulmonary disease such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

Of course each profession has its own set of terms and abbreviations. You will see me use some of the above from my RT profession and feel free to ask questions. I may also use "ALS to mean Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and not Advanced Life Support but then the context of the statement should indicate that.

Examples of different abbreviations for other professions (most are recognized internationally):

Respiratory Therapy
http://www.rcjournal...ors/symbols.pdf

Physical Therapy
http://physicalthera...breviations.htm

Radiology
http://www.rtstudent...breviations.htm



EMS sometimes falls outside of some standardized abbreviations. Example: DIB may mean Difficulty in breathing to EMS but is rarely used in the hosptials. The hospital staff may use SOB or DOE which can be more descriptive.

Thus, the abbreviations that are literally made up (and some do have a habit of doing that) and not listed in YOUR own policy manual are the ones that are truly invalid for your charting purposes. However, it is wise to follow the "do not use" list especially when it comes to medications. Write out what you can. However, if you do a thorough lung exam, it might take up alot of space to write out each lobe or segment.

That being said, I will try to write out some of the abbreviations. However, I suggest you get into the habit of reading medical literature (other than JEMS) which will generally have a list of many different terms and abbreviations included with each article. This will also help you when reading medical reports in patient charts.
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#14 speedygodzilla

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:39 PM

Thanks. Not all systems use the same abbreviations and that's not been one of mine. That one we are expected to spell out. :D

Actually, it would be great if everyone got in the habit of spelling out the word with their suggested abbreviation in the original post. Then, others can follow suit if they choose. That way, we are all on the same page. (i.e., ...pnuemonia (PNA)...)

Either that, or we create a page on this site with agreed to abbreviations/acronyms?


I totally agree. I had guess pneumonia from the context but wasn't totally sure.

I am a brand new medic as well, have yet to even start orientation yet (waiting for state license). I plan to only give Duonebs with chronic conditions, and when their at home treatment is ineffective. I figure you can always start off with Albuterol, and add Atrovent down the road as needed. But I do plan to start my COPD, asthma patients who have had little to no relief from Albuterol alone off with a Duoneb from the start.

As for the CHF patients, well I have the advantage of having CPAP where I work and plan to start off with that and add Albuterol through CPAP as indicated. I too have heard many medics say they will never give CHF patients Albuterol and I beleive I understand the risk of opening the lungs to all the fluid. But with CPAP I have come to the understanding that they constant pressure reduces this risk and keeps the aviola open. Still not 100% clear on this as I have yet to see it done on a patient and if I have I seem to have forgotten, too busy driving.

Good questions!
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#15 VentMedic

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:39 PM

Great idea. Might be something to put in the site rules, if anybody reads them when they join! :rolleyes:


Does that mean I have to write out SpO2 as "Oxygen Saturation by pulse oximetry" each time?
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