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A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off by an artery in the brain that either ruptures or is blocked, cutting off critical oxygen supply to neurons. Approximately 80 percent of neurons die within three hours of the time that oxygen is cut off; therefore, rapid action is critical to prevent irreversible brain damage. Healthcare professionals working with adult patients have developed a catchphrase—“Time is brain”—recognizing that acute stroke recognition and treatment is of premier importance to preserve brain tissue, limit the amount of disability patients suffer in the long-term, and increase the stroke survival rate.

In order to save time—and potentially brain function—in patients that have suffered a stroke, the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association have developed a community-oriented “Stroke Chain of Survival” that links specific actions to be taken by patients and family members with recommended actions by stroke prehospital care providers, emergency department (ED) personnel and in-hospital specialty services.

The “Stroke Chain of Survival” is characterized by four sequential stages, including

  1. Rapid recognition and reaction to acute stroke warning signs;
  2. Rapid emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch;
  3. Rapid EMS system transport and prearrival notification to the receiving hospital; and
  4. Rapid diagnosis and treatment in the hospital.

These four stages within the “Stroke Chain of Survival” include the execution of seven distinct steps in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment, also known as the Seven D’s. The seven steps also highlight the key points at which delays can occur, necessitating organized and efficient care at each step to avoid needless delays. The Seven D’s of stroke care, as well as the major actions to be performed in each step, are:

  1. Detection of the onset of signs and symptoms of acute stroke. Early recognition of hallmark signs and symptoms of acute stroke is critical to improved patient outcomes.
  2. Dispatch of EMS by telephoning 911 or another emergency response number. This communication activates EMS systems and ensures prompt EMS response.
  3. Delivery of patient to a medical facility. Patients should be transported to a stroke hospital or other facility capable of providing acute stroke care, and advanced prehospital notification should be given to the selected medical facility.
  4. Door of the emergency department (ED). Immediately upon arrival, the patient should undergo general and neurologic assessment in the ED.
  5. Data collection, including computer tomography (CT) scan and serial neurologic exams, along with reviews of patient file for potential fibrinolytics (tPA) exclusions.
  6. Decision regarding stroke treatment. If the patient remains a candidate for tPA therapy, review risks and benefits with patient and family and obtain informed consent for tPA therapy.
  7. Drug administration as appropriate, and post-administration monitoring.

The window for administering treatment after a stroke is very limited. From the onset of stroke to the administration of treatment at a hospital or other medical facility, the Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommends that no more than three hours elapse to ensure improved patient outcomes and maximize the chance of stroke survival.

"Time is brain" is more than a catchphrase—it is a call to arms in acute stroke care. Healthcare providers, hospitals and communities must rally to develop streamlined response systems to execute the Seven D’s of stroke survival and give stroke victims the best care possible, the best chance of survival and the best chance for resuming a normal life.

For more information on stroke certification, stroke training, or acute stoke certification, visit Health Education Solutions’ overview of stroke courses offered online.

Health Education Solutions additionally offers ACLS, PALS and BLS certification courses, as well as CPR and AED certification.

The information included in this article is based on the 2005 guidelines for CPR, first aid and advanced cardiovascular care.

Health Education Solutions, a leading provider of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification and pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification, today released a new Florida and Arizona Health Trends Special Section to help medical professionals, nurses, first responders and other healthcare workers in these two states learn more about industry data, health trends and training options. This series of articles is available in Health Education Solutions’ online research library.

“Recent health trends have led to an increased demand for healthcare professionals certified in resuscitation techniques,” said Melissa Marks, president of Health Education Solutions. “In Health Education Solutions’ online courses for PALS and ACLS certification, Florida and Arizona healthcare professionals – as well as those from across the nation – can learn valuable skills and advance their careers with industry-focused resources and convenient online certification courses.”

Florida (FL) loses more children under age 5 to drowning than any other state, according to the Florida Department of Public Health. In Arizona (AZ), more than 65 percent of adults are overweight or obese, putting the population at a higher risk for cardiovascular disease. These health trends underscore the need for healthcare professionals in these states to be skilled in lifesaving care.

The resource section is free and available for individuals seeking information about ACLS and PALS certification, Arizona and Florida healthcare professionals and anyone who simply wants to be prepared to provide care in an emergency situation. Highlights include:

  • PALS Certification: AZ Pediatric Health Trends Every Nurse Should Know About
  • Recent Health Trends and ACLS Certification: FL

Health Education Solutions offers ACLS, PALS and basic life support (BLS) certification and recertification courses for first responders and healthcare professionals, as well as first aid courses, CPR certification and automated external defibrillator (AED) training for individuals seeking lifesaving skills.

Health Education Solutions’ ACLS, PALS and BLS courses incorporate the most up-to-date first aid and life support guidelines and are available in convenient online formats. The ACLS certification and PALS certification courses were developed in partnership with Union College.

For more information about ACLS certification, Florida and Arizona health trends and other healthcare certifications, please visit http://www.healthedsolutions.com/articles/acls-pals-florida-arizona.

In 2010, the American Heart Association released new guidelines for first aid and life support courses. With a new set of ACLS modules and ACLS test questions, 2011 certification courses will have some distinct differences from those based on the 2005 guidelines. Does this mean that individuals certified under the 2005 guidelines need to recertify right now?

Michael Huckabee, PhD, PA-C, director of the Union College Physician Assistant program and curriculum developer for Health Education Solutions, explains it here:

Do I have to complete the ACLS test questions again?

Individuals with certification under the 2005 guidelines won’t be required to recertify until their two-year ACLS certification expires. Course completion cards continue to be recognized as valid for two years, regardless of science changes. If you were certified under the 2005 guidelines, you should continue to perform ACLS tactics according to the 2005 standards until you’re trained under the new 2010 guidelines.

Are my ACLS test questions and answers no longer accurate?

The new recommendations don’t suggest that earlier guidelines and ACLS test questions were unsafe or ineffective; they’re simply more up-to-date. As Huckabee explained, these new guidelines represent the state-of-the-art of resuscitation science today. The routine protocols of ACLS have undergone the greatest scrutiny in the review process, and the evidence-based approach to the new guidelines is refreshing and relevant. While the previous standards remain acceptable, it’s reasonable to conclude that the new guidelines stress a more informed quality of care in typically life-threatening situations. The sooner healthcare professionals have all been trained in these standards, the more likely the medical team can efficiently respond to emergencies with effective treatment.

When will instructors begin to teach the new guidelines?

Health Education Solutions’ ACLS online training will reflect the new guidelines in the first quarter of 2011. Instructors will teach 2005 guidelines until they have received training on the 2010 guidelines.

Health Education Solutions offers online certification and PALS and ACLS recertification, as well as a variety of other life support and first aid certifications, which can be valuable tools for healthcare professionals and other individuals looking to be prepared in an emergency situation. ACLS and PALS courses were developed in partnership with Union College. Courses, which can serve as both a PALS or ACLS study guide online, will reflect the new science guidelines in the first quarter of 2011.

Today, online learning options are available in nearly every field of study – and healthcare certification is no exception. Professionals looking to earn pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification or PALS recertification have the option of taking their PALS courses online. Before you decide whether or not you want to sign up for an online course, here are three important facts about online learning.

1. Online PALS courses allow you to work at your own pace.

As a healthcare professional, you may not have the average 8 to 5 work day, making it difficult to fit a traditional class into your schedule. Taking a PALS course online means more flexibility to review materials on your own time and at your own pace. If you’re seeking initial certification, after finishing the online portion of the PALS course, you can schedule a time to validate your hands-on skills and complete a skills check at a local training center.

2. In an online course, you might learn more.

A 2009 report (Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning) from the U.S. Department of Education showed that students who take an entire course or part of a course online, on average, display better performance levels than those who take the same course through traditional instruction. A review of key findings from more than 1,000 studies on online education published between 1996 and 2008 showed that not only have online courses become more popular over time, but they have also become an increasingly effective learning strategy.

3. Online education is a growing trend.

The usage and legitimacy of online education in the healthcare field is on the rise. Continuing medical education, or CME, has increasingly moved online over the past few years. A recent study (“The Growth, Characteristics, and Future of Online CME,” Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, Winter 2010) estimates that approximately half of doctors will earn their CME through online learning by the year 2016. Taking your PALS course online now is a smart way to become familiar with the online learning approach.

Learn more about Health Education Solutions’ online PALS certification.

When it comes to saving lives, efficiency is key. In order to make sure that protocols for life-saving procedures are up to date, the American Heart Association evaluates existing guidelines and examines available research every five years in order to determine whether changes need to be made.

The most recent updates for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), pediatric advanced life support (PALS), basic life support (BLS) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were announced in late 2010. Updates for ACLS, online PALS certification and BLS certification have been added to Health Education Solutions courses.

Michael Huckabee, PhD, PA-C, director of the Union College Physician Assistant program and curriculum developer for Health Education Solutions, explained the following important changes to ACLS guidelines:

Changes in Chest Compression Guidelines

When performing a life saving procedure that requires chest compressions, the compressions should depress the adult sternum at least 2 inches and complete recoil of the chest is required. Previously, guidelines only recommended 1 ½ to 2 inches. The recommendation for the rate of chest compressions has also been changed from about 100 per minute to at least 100 per minute. Additionally, ACLS guidelines now state that checking for a pulse on an unresponsive victim should take less than 10 seconds in order to avoid delaying chest compressions – it is more harmful to delay chest compressions on someone without a pulse than it is to mistakenly do chest compressions on someone with a pulse.

A-B-C is now C-A-B

Previously known as the A-B-C approach (Airway-Breathing-Circulation), ACLS guidelines now call for the C-A-B approach (Circulation-Airway-Breathing) when performing CPR as a single rescuer. Immediately initiating chest compressions helps maintain blood flow for individuals with life-threatening loss of heart function. When a team is performing CPR, management of respirations and circulations can happen simultaneously.

New Medication Guidelines

The updated guidelines include four new recommendations for medication protocol:

1. Adenosine is recommended for the treatment of stable, undifferentiated wide-complex tachycardia when the rhythm is regular and the QRS waveform is monomorphic.

2. Atropine is no longer recommended for routine use to manage asytole or pulseless electrical activity (PEA) due to a lack of therapeutic benefit.

3. Oxygen supplementation is no longer routinely indicated for uncomplicated acute coronary syndromes and should only be applied if the oxyhemoglobin saturation is less than or equal to 94 percent.

4. Intravenous chronotopic agents are recommended for individuals with symptomatic or unstable bradycardia as an alternative to external pacing.

Recommendations for Quantitative Waveform Capnography

Use of quantitative waveform capnography is recommended for confirmation and monitoring of endotracheal tube placement. The continuous measurement provides the partial pressure of exhaled carbon dioxide in mm Hg over time. Patients that require endotracheal intubation are at risk of tube displacement during transport and transfer. The continuous waveform capnography reflects any changes and provides a monitor of effective chest compressions. The return of spontaneous circulation, which is otherwise difficult to identify, is clearly shown on the capnography measure by a sudden increase in the CO2 readings.

New Section for Post-Cardiac Arrest Care

The new ACLS guidelines include a section for Post-Cardiac Arrest Care that emphasizes a structured system of care for a patient following a cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment and percutaneous coronary interventions should be provided when indicated after a cardiac arrest.

Recommendations for Stroke Care

Guidelines recommend stroke care through regional systems of care and organized stroke units, while prehospital treatment of blood pressure is de-emphasized. Additionally, while it is still recommended that thrombolytics (rTPA) are used within three hours of onset of stroke symptoms, the window of time can be extended to be within four and one-half hours after symptoms onset for selected patients.

Priorities for Emergency Care

Using advanced airways, gaining vascular access and administering drugs should not take priority over high quality CPR and access to immediate defibrillation. This recommendation is made in order to avoid interruptions to chest compressions or delays in use of defibrillators.

Previous ACLS/PALS Certification Remains Valid

Healthcare professionals trained under old ACLS guidelines are not required to immediately take a new course. The previous guidelines are still considered safe and effective, and individuals trained under earlier guidelines should continue to perform under the standards they learned until they are trained under the new protocols. ACLS/PALS certification will continue to be recognized as valid for a two-year period, regardless of procedural changes.

If you’re preparing to certify or recertify in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification online, mastering a few simple study skills can bolster your chances of ACLS exam success.

Health Education Solutions, the leading online provider of Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification, offers these tips to help you make the most out of your ACLS certification course and prepare for the ACLS exam.

1. Use mnemonic devices to remember key algorithms. In ACLS, algorithms are a simple set of procedures that help you solve a treatment problem. Mnemonic devices can help you remember the steps to saving a life. Here are a few examples from the ACLS course:

• If a patient displays bradycardia (an unusually low heart rate) remember “Pacing Always Ends Danger:” TCP (transcutaneous pacing), atropine, epinephrine, dopamine. Just remember, these are options for treatment of various forms of bradycardia, and not an ordered list. Usually atropine and epinephrine are tried first, then depending on the situation dopamine may be used and pacing is last. If the situation is acutely life-threatening, sometimes temporary pacing is indicated.

• If a patient experiences cardioversion (an unusually rapid heart rate) remember “Oh Say It Isn’t So:” O2 saturation monitor, suctioning equipment, IV line, intubation equipment, sedation and possibly analgesics.

Mnemonic devices trigger faster recall, which is vital in emergency situations. The six H’s and five T’s are the most common mnemonic devices in ACLS – required learning for your ACLS exam.

The six H’s

• Hypovolemia

• Hypoxia

• Hydrogen ion – Acidosis

• Hyper- or Hypokalemia

• Hypoglycemia

• Hypothermia

The five T’s

• Toxins

• Tamponade – cardiac

• Tension pneumothorax

• Thrombosis – coronary or pulmonary

• Trauma

2. Know your pharmaceuticals. When performing ACLS, intravenous (IV) drugs are sometimes needed, and it’s important to know which drugs are pertinent in which situations.

• Adenosine: An anti-arrhythmia drug often used for stable supraventricular tachycardia.

• Amiodarone: Used when a patient is in v-fib (when the heart does not empty and contractions are mild quivers that cannot sustain life) or v-tach (when the heart is pumping too fast).

• Atropine: Treats bradycardia (low heart rate) by blocking the vagus nerve.

• Epinephrine: Increases cardiac output by momentarily decreasing blood flow to the limbs, which increases the blood output from the heart.

• Lidocaine: Used to treat a ventricular arrhythmia (irregular heart rate) often preventing the heart from providing oxygenated blood to the body. New ACLS guidelines also recommend procainamide here.

• Magnesium Sulfate: An anti-arrhythmia drug used for torsades de pointes, a peculiar and rare ventricular arrhythmia. It is otherwise seldom used unless a person is low in magnesium, or in other non-cardiac clinical conditions.

• Procainamide: An anti-arrhythmia drug used to counteract a variety of arrhythmias.

• Vasopressin: Administered to increase cardiac output and improve circulation to vital organs.

Health Education Solutions offers an ACLS Pharmacology Guide, available free to all ACLS students for use when preparing for the ACLS exam.

3. It all comes back to CPR. In 2010, guidelines for CPR transitioned the A-B-C (Airway-Breathing-Circulation) approach to a new C-A-B (Circulation-Airway-Breathing) approach. The emphasis is on quickly initiating chest compressions in individuals with life-threatening loss of heart function so that blood flow is maintained. It primarily applies to single rescuer CPR. In the hospital setting and with teams, management of circulation and respirations are achieved simultaneously.

While memory aids and mnemonics are helpful when mastering ACLS material, the best preparation tool is confidence. It’s important to use course materials as an ACLS study guide to prepare effectively and thoroughly for the exam. 


Health Education Solutions is the leading provider of online ACLS certification and recertification for healthcare professionals and first responders. ACLS and PALS courses, which now incorporate 2010 patient care recommendations, were developed in partnership with Union College. Read more about how the 2010 guidelines impact ACLS online training.

For more information, click here: Your ACLS Study Guide

Employment for EMTs and paramedics is expected to grow by 19 percent between 2006 and 2016, faster than the average for all occupations, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. To help the increasing number of emergency services professionals, or those considering entering the field, learn more about first responder training, advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification, pediatric advanced life support (PALS) certification, and career opportunities, Health Education Solutions, the leading provider of continuing education solutions for healthcare professionals, today released a new First Responder Special Section. This series of articles, infographics, vignettes and important facts about first responder certification is available in Health Education Solutions’ online research library.

“As growing numbers of people join the ranks of this lifesaving profession, training and continuing education will become increasingly important,” said Melissa Marks, president of Health Education Solutions. “Whether you’re just entering the emergency care field or looking to update your professional skills, Health Education Solutions’ research library and online healthcare certification courses can help you stay equipped and informed.”

The special section is free for first responders, healthcare providers and individuals who simply want to be prepared to provide emergency care. Highlights include:

• Employment Outlook for Paramedics and EMTs

• Five Things You Should Know About Emergency First Response

• CECBEMS Approval Identifies Legitimate Learning Opportunities

• Solutions to Automated External Defibrillator Challenges

Health Education Solutions offers PALS, ACLS and basic life support (BLS) training for first responders and healthcare professionals, as well as first aid courses and CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) training for individuals seeking to learn lifesaving skills. PALS and ACLS online courses were developed in partnership with Union College.

For more information, please visit www.healthedsolutions.com.

Ten of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in the U.S. are healthcare related, underscoring the vital need for training and resources to support this expanding industry. To improve the educational experience for this critical population, Health Education Solutions, the leading provider of continuing education solutions for healthcare professionals, today released a new Careers in Healthcare Special Section. This series of articles, vignettes and important facts about careers in healthcare and continuing healthcare education is available in Health Education Solutions’ online research library. The 10-article special section is free for healthcare providers, first responders and individuals who simply want to be prepared to provide emergency care.

“In the healthcare industry, proper certification is vital to securing employment, and continuing education is integral to career growth,” said Melissa Marks, Director of Health Education Solutions. “Whether you're seeking to update your professional skills, or just want to be prepared for a medical emergency, Health Education Solutions’ research library and online courses make vital information easily accessible.”

The special section includes information about careers in healthcare, as well as information about healthcare certification, stories, how-tos and more. Here are some highlights:

• Thinking About EMT Training? How About a Career as an EMT?

• Traveling Nurses Can Keep Career Options Open with Online Certification

• Today’s Healthcare Profession – Job Trends and Opportunities

• Careers in the Fitness Industry: Interview with the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association

Health Education Solutions offers online certification and recertification for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) and pediatric advanced life support (PALS). ACLS and PALS courses follow the American Heart Association guidelines and were developed in partnership with Union College.

For more information or to access the online research library, please visit www.healthedsolutions.com.

Every year, about 785,000 Americans have a first heart attack and another 470,000 have a recurrent one. Healthcare professionals certified in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) save many of their lives. Health Education Solutions, the leading provider of continuing education solutions for healthcare professionals, today released a new ACLS Special Section, a series of articles, vignettes and important facts about ACLS and ACLS certification, available in its online research library. The 10-article special section is free for healthcare providers and others who want to learn more about this important life-saving skill set.

"Now more than ever, busy healthcare professionals need easy access to training and resources that will help them respond to medical emergencies," said David King, president of Health Education Solutions. "Whether you're seeking to update your professional skills, need continuing medical education credits or require certification or recertification in ACLS, it's easy to get the vital information you need through Health Education Solutions' research library and online courses."

The special section includes information about the ACLS course, as well as stories, how-tos and more. Here are some highlights:

• Four Important Things to Know About ACLS Certification

• Your ACLS Study Guide: Three Keys to Success

• AED Training: Challenges to AED Use

• F.A.S.T. Stroke Assessment

• Heart Attack Symptoms Differ with Gender and Ethnicity

Health Education Solutions offers a variety of ways for healthcare professionals and others who want to be prepared for a medical emergency to master the skills they need. For example, the online Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) recertification and initial certification courses provide training in the key skills necessary to intervene when someone experiences a heart attack or other medical emergency.

Initial certification requires completion of an in-person skills test, whereas recertification is 100 percent online. Students have access to the course materials for 12 months after purchase regardless of when they take their exam.

Using a blended approach to learning, the ACLS course offers the convenience of self-paced study as students work toward certification and continuing medical education credits. Health Education Solutions also offers online certification and recertification for pediatric advanced life support (PALS). ACLS and PALS courses follow the American Heart Association guidelines and were developed in partnership with Union College.

For more information or to access the online research library, please visit www.healthedsolutions.com.

About nine percent of children who suffer from cardiac arrest outside a hospital and 27 percent of those who experience cardiac arrest in a hospital setting will survive—most of them thanks to a healthcare professional certified in pediatric advanced life support (PALS). Health Education Solutions, the leading provider of continuing education solutions for healthcare professionals, today released a new PALS Special Section, a series of articles, vignettes and important facts about PALS and PALS certification, available in its online research library. The 10-article special section is free for healthcare providers and others who want to learn more about this important life-saving set of skills.

“Pediatric emergency care requires a unique set of skills, as well as a strong understanding of the differences between caring for an adult versus a child or infant,” said David King, president of Health Education Solutions. “Whether you're seeking to update your professional skills, need continuing medical education credits or require certification or recertification in PALS, it’s easy to get the vital information you need through Health Education Solutions’ research library and online courses.”

The special section includes information about the PALS online course, as well as stories, how-tos and more. Here are some highlights:

• The Need for Pediatric Emergency Assessment

• Signs and Symptoms of Shock in Children and Infants

• The Three Most Common Causes of Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

• Not-So-Fun in the Sun: Summertime Months Bring Heightened Incidence of Pediatric Injury

• The What, When, Who, Where and Why of PALS

Health Education Solutions offers a variety of ways for healthcare professionals and others to learn the skills they need to be prepared for a medical emergency. For example, the online Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) recertification and initial certification courses provide training in the key skills necessary to help a child experiencing a heart attack or other medical emergency.

Initial certification requires completion of an in-person skills test, whereas recertification is 100 percent online. Students have access to the course materials for 12 months after purchase regardless of when they take their exam.

Utilizing a blended approach to learning, the PALS course offers the convenience of self-paced study as students work toward certification and continuing medical education credits. Health Education Solutions also offers online certification and recertification for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). ACLS and PALS courses follow the American Heart Association guidelines and were developed in partnership with Union College.

Through participation in the American Heart Association Enterprise Program, Health Education Solutions additionally offers Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Online Part 1, Heartsaver® and stroke courses.

For more information or to access the online research library, please visit http://www.healthedsolutions.com.

A sudden cardiac arrest victim's chance of survival falls seven to 10 percent for every minute of delay until defibrillation if CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is not provided, underscoring the need for training in this lifesaving skill set. Health Education Solutions, the leading provider of continuing education solutions for healthcare professionals and the general public, today released a new Heartsaver® Special Section, a series of articles, vignettes and important facts about the American Heart Association's Heartsaver® courses, including CPR and Automated External Defibrillator (AED), First Aid and Bloodborne Pathogens certifications.

The 10-article special section is now available in Health Education Solutions' online research library. It is free for healthcare providers, first responders and individuals who simply want to be prepared to provide emergency care.

"CPR and AED are important skills for not only healthcare workers and first responders, but also for child care workers, fitness and recreation professionals, and even moms and dads or anyone else who interacts with people on a day-to-day basis," said David King, president of Health Education Solutions. "Whether you're seeking to update your professional skills, or just want to be prepared for a medical emergency, Health Education Solutions' research library and online courses make vital information easily accessible."

The special section includes information and stories about first aid certification and other related topics. Here are some highlights:

• Eight Things NOT to Do When Performing CPR

• Heartsaver® First Aid and CPR at Home

• What Are Bloodborne Pathogens and How Do They Spread?

• First Aid at Work: Best Practices and Fundamentals

Through participation in the American Heart Association Enterprise Program, Health Education Solutions provides the cognitive portions of the Heartsaver® courses entirely online. The courses' web-based, self-paced modules offer a flexible training option for anyone seeking to learn lifesaving skills. Following the online course, students are required to meet with an American Heart Association instructor to complete a hands-on skills practice session and test.

Heartsaver® training for CPR, first aid courses and other American Heart Association certification options include Heartsaver® First Aid Online Part 1, Heartsaver® CPR and AED Online Part 1, Heartsaver® First Aid Online with CPR & AED Part 1 and Heartsaver® Bloodborne Pathogens Online. Other courses offered through the American Heart Association Enterprise Program include Stroke and BLS for Healthcare Providers Online Part 1.

Health Education Solutions also offers online certification and recertification for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) and pediatric advanced life support (PALS). ACLS and PALS courses follow the American Heart Association guidelines and were developed in partnership with Union College.

For more information or to access the online research library, please visit www.healthedsolutions.com.

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